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Full text of "Minutes of the organization of the Liberty Baptist Association"

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

THE Z SMITH REYNOLDS LIBKARY 




1935-19AO 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/minutesoforganiz3540libe 



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LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

NORTH CAROLINA 



One-Hundredth and Third Annual Session 
Held Wifh 

Mills Home Baptist Church 

Thomasville, North Carolina 
Sept. 3rd and 4lh, 1935 



The Next Session Will Be Held Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday after the First Sunday in Septermber, 1935 
with the Reeds Church, Lexington, N. C, 
R. F. D. No. 3. 




/ 



Index 



Page 

Appointment of Committees 9 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 28 

Auxiliaries — Associational 2 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 4 

Church Clerks 33 

Church Treasurers 34 

Churches and Messengers 4 

Committees: Associational Advisory 2 

Finance 9 

On Nominations 9 

Program for 1936 17 

To Report 1936 Chairman 2 

On Digest of Church Letters— 1936 17 

On Time, Place and Preacher 9 

On Reception of New Churches 10 

Standing 4 

Constitution and By-Laws 23 

Deceased Members 22 

Directories : Associational 28 — 2 

Election of Officers 12 

Church 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 

• B. Y. P. U 28 

Ordained Ministers 28 

R. A. and G. A 30 

Sunbeams 30 

W. M. U 29 

Historical Table 24 

Johnson, Archibald 17 — 1 

Order of Business 6 

Orphanage Representative 17 

Pastors of Association 28 — 31 

Pastors, New 5 

Pleasant Plains 10—17 

Proceedings, Associational 6 

Proceedings of W. M. U. Annual Meeting 25 

Reports: Religious Literature 7 

Committee on Obituaries 17 — 22 

B. T. U 19 

Committee on Nominations 12 — 17 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 13 

Digest of Churrh Letters 10 

Education 11 

Foreign Missions 16 

Hospitals 11 

Home Missions 15 

Mills Home 7 

Public Morals 17 

State Missions 14 

Sunday Schools 19 

Treasurer 21 

W. M. U 13 

Standing Resolutions 23 

Statistical Tables 31 

Sermon, Annual 9 

Spring Session 13 

Sunday School Superintendents 32 

Visitors 9 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries and Officers 29—2 



ARCHIBALD JOHNSON 
1859-1934 

Editor of Charity and Children Nearly 40 Years 
Moderator Liberty Association 
1923-1930 
Clerk Liberty Association 
1918-1922 



1 

2 MINUTES OF THE 



DIRECTORY 

OFFICERS 

R. D. Covington, Moderator Thomasville, N. C. 

G. W. Miller, Vice Moderator Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk and Treasurer Lexington, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Rev. Walter Warford, Chairman Lexington, N. C. 



D. S. Hayworth, High Point, N. C, Rt. 4; D. L. Tysinger, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6; 
W. H. Lomax, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1; A. L. Snider, Denton, N. C; J. W. Dickens, 
N. C, Rt. 6; W. C. Roach, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6; C. M. Wall, Lexington, N. C; 
W. B. May, Cid, N. C; J. A. Kinney, High Rock, N. C; I. G. Greer, Thomasville, 
N. C; William G. GrilTin, Wiston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4; J. F. Foster, Lexington, N. 
C, Rt. 3; Wilford Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C; W. L. Smith, Lexington, N. C, 
Rt. 6; Lewis Barringer, Salisbury, N. C; Edd Epps, Thomasville, N. C; C. C. 
Wrenn, Southmont, N. C; Frank Davis, Denton, N. C; Carl Haynes, Erlinger, N. 
C; John Epps, Newsom, N. C.j L. W. Hansell, Thomasville, N. C; Miss Etta 
Teague, Wallburg, N. C; M. L. Craver, Welcome, N. C; W. H. Beuse, Thomas- 
ville, N. C. All pastors, the Moderator and Clerk of the Association are Ex-Of- 
ficio members. 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES TO REPORT AT 1936 SESSION 



Baptist Hospitals Rev. J. A. Neilson, Thomasville, N. C. 

B .T. U Prof. Romulus Skaggs, Thomasville, N. C. 

Christian Education Miss Elizabeth Smith, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Foreign Missions Rev. Vann Carroll, Denton, N. C. 

Home Missions Rev. J. D. Newton, Thomasville, N. C. 

Ministerial Relief Dr. C. R. Sharpe, Lexington, N. C. 

Mills Home Rev. W. K. McGee, Thomasville, N. C. 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement L. W. Matthews, Wallburg, N. C. 

Religious Literature J. A. McMillan, Thomasville, N. C. 

State of Churches Rev. E. N. C. Andrews, Thomasville, N. C. 

State Missions Henry Lomax, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Sunday Schools Conrad Motsinger, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 3 

W. M. U Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
B. Y. P. U. 

Annual Meeting not held; due to infantile paralysis situation.. Rev. Walter 
Warfford, Lexington, N. C, President. Miss Eve Jones, Thomasville, N. C, Sec- 
retary. 

. W. M. U. 

The Annual Associational Meeting was held with the New Friendship 
Church, April 24, 1935. 

OFFICERS 

Superintendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville, N. C; Associate 
Supt., Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C; Sec. and Treas., Mrs. Maskey M. 
Smith, Rt. 6, Winston-Salem, N. C; Junior Supt., Miss Clara Crowder, Winston- 
Salem, N. C, Rt. 5; Personal Service Chrm., Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. 
C, Rt. 6; Miss Study Chrm., Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 




REV. J. A. NEILSON 

Pastor of the Mills Home Church 
Thomasville, N. C. 



4 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 

No Associational Annual Convention was held during the year. Several I 
Monthly Associational meetings were held. 

OFFICERS — President, A. C. Lovelace, Thomasville, N. C; Vice President, ] 
C. C. Wrenn, Southmont, N. C; Secretary, Rev. Walter L. Warfford, Lexington, ] 
N.C. 

BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE ASSOCIATON ] 

The Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. Established in 1885. Gen. Manager, 
Hon. I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C. Treasurer, R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. 1 
C. Chrm. Board of Trustees, B. W. Spillman, Kinston, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL, MISSIONARY, STANDING COMMITTEES, I 1 

REPRESENTATIVES, AUXILIARY MEETINGS, ETC. 1 

Associational Missionary or other Paid Employees — None. Standing Com- 
mittees — None. Representative of Laymen's Movements — None. Laymen's Move- ' 
ments — None. 

The Association has no W. M. U. Auxiliary, Sunday School Convention or i 
B. Y. P. U. Convention, which meet at the same time or during the sessions of the 
Association. 

LIST OF MESSENGERS FOR THE 1935 SESSIONS 

As Listed on the Church Letters 
ABBOTTS CREEK— T. Carrick Teague, W. D. Spurgeon, Grady Green,i 
Miss Minnie Hayworth, J. R. Phillips, Ivey Orrel 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. H. D. Bradshaw, Mrs. O. P. Cressman, Mrs. 
A. J. Lowe, J. E. Hoyle. 

CENTER HILL— H. L. Miller, Mrs. H. L. Miller, Mrs. Mary Owens, G. R. 
Bean, Ulus Hunt, Clifford Hunt, Lloyd Owens. 

CHURCHLAND— Mr. and Mrs. Duncan, Mrs. J. C. Sowers, Mrs. John 
Brewer, W. Henry Lomax, D. R. Kesler, R. K. Williams, L. E. Rickard, W. H. 
Beck, J. L. McBride. 

DENTON— A. L. Snider, Mrs. A. L. Snider, Mrs. R. A. Allen, Mrs. C. E. 
Clyatt, Mrs. R. C. Wall, J. L. Snider, W. R. Snider, Mrs. Will Rush, H. M. Snider, 
Mrs. H .M. Snider. 

HOLLOWAYS— Albert Warfford, Jones Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Crossy 
Treva Dickens, Jennie L. Palmer, G. C. Palmer, B. R. Cross, J. A. McCarn. 

JERSEY— I. A. Sharoe, W. L. Roach, W. C. Roach, Mrs. I. A. Shaipe, Mis^ 
Elizabeth Smith, Mrs. W. L. Roach. 

LEXINGTON— Rev. L. S. Gaines, C. M. Wall, Sam J. Smith, E. L. Morgan, 
G. W. Miller, Miss Roxie Sheets, Mrs. T. S. Cross, Mrs. Sam J. Smith, Mrs. D. F, 
Conrad, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Morgan, Harry Philpott, David Smith, Helen Smith, 
Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Myers, Mrs. C. R. Sharpe, Bettie Ann Sharpe, Reta Sharpe, 
Ruth Sharp, S. E. Miller, Miss Callie Carroll, Rev. Gilmer Cross. 

LIBERTY— Mr. and Mrs. B. J. May, L. V. Miller, Mrs. Bessie Clodfelterj 
Mable Hepler, Mr. and Mrs. N. W. Whitaker, Everett Cowman, Mrs. L. V. Miller, 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Hepler. 

LICK CREEK— Mrs. A. W. Feezor, Miss Effie Daniel, Miss Bettie Daniel, 
Paul Daniel, David Kinney, A. L. Bean. 

MILLS HOME— Paul Eddinger, Miss Annie Hall, H. G. Early, Edgar 
Brock, Mrs. B. F. Cruchfield, Miss Bertha Calloway, Mrs. E. Lee Fox, Mrs. L. M. 
Bannister, Mrs. Mattie Hardy, Miss Wille Sherman. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. W. J. Griffin, G. A. Hartman, C. F. Motsinger, 
E. L. Snider, Mrs. W. A. Shoaf, Erastus Swaim. 

OAK GROVE — Marvin Hedrick, Mrs. Bessie Owen, Arlis Roach, Aaron 
Davis. 

PLEASANT PLAINS— Clayton Hunt, Mrs. Clayton McCaskill, Mrs. Grady 
Hunt, Mrs. Deck Sexton, Carnie Henson, Howard Hunt, Wilson Hughes, Werna 
Hughes. 

REEDS— Frank Foster, Mrs. E. C. Roach, I. A. Myers, Gene Hege, Homer 
Craver, Walter Craver, Mrs. Walter Craver. 

RICH FORK— Willie Bowers, Mozelle Slinard, Sallie Grander, Anna Clin- 
ard, Wilford Eddinger, D. W. Clinard, Mrs. F. H. Small. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Delegates not listed on Church Letter. 

SMITH GROVE— Herman Grubb, Hazel Grubb, Irene Beck. 

SOUTHSIDE— Mr. J. C. Mauldin, Mrs. J. C. Mauldin. 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. R. 0. Hedrick, C. C. Wrenn, A. F. Warfford, 
Hugh WarfFord, O. L. Stoner. 

SUMMERVILLE— E. L Snider,Mrs. Will Davis, Mrs. George Tysinger. 

TABERNACLE— Mrs. B. L. Hames, Mrs. T. B. Marlin, Mrs. Melvin Bryant, 
Miss Frances Shytle. 

TAYLORS GROVE— John Epps, Miss Flatie Russell, Mrs. J. M. Coggins, 
John H. Cranford, Mrs. Rebecca Michael, Mrs. Add Cranford. 

THOMASVILLE— L. W. Hansell, 0. W. Cain, Mrs. R. S. Green, L. A. Bru- 
to, L. E. Teague. 

WALLBURG— Charlie Dodson, H. F. Pardue, A. W. Clinard. 

WALTERS GROVE— Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Gallimore, Mr. and Mrs. Johnnie 
! Byerly, Miss Arris Gallimore, Miss Vergie Gallimore, Mr. and Mrs. Gurnie Pierce, 
Mrs. E. L. Pierce. 

WELCOME^W. S. Disher, M. L. Craver, W. H. Snider, Mrs. W. S. Disher, 
Mrs. B. R. Zimmerman, Mrs. Ira Snider. 

NEW PASTORS RECEIVED AND WELCOMED INTO THE ASSOCIATION 

W. Vann Carroll, pastor of the Denton Church; Rev. E. N. C. Andrews, pas- 
tor at Rich Fork; W. C. Darnell, pastor at Summerville; W. H. Hopkins, pastor 
at Walters Grove; Rev. Clyde Eddinger, pastor at the Welcome church; Dr. W. 
K. McGee, pastor of First church, Thomasville, N. C, and J. A. Neilson, pastor of 
the Mills Home church, Thomasville, N. C. 



6 



MINUTES OF THE 



PROCEEDINGS 

—of the— 

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Held With The 
MILLS HOME CHURCH 
Thomasville, N. C. 



FIRST DAY 



!a 



Tuesday, September 3, 1935 

1. The One Hundreth and Third annual session of the Liberty Baptist con- 
vened with the Mills Home church, Thomasville, N. C, Tuesday, September 3rd, 
1935, at 9:45 A. M. 

2. The devotional for the opening service was led by Rev. J. A. Neilson, pas- 
tor of the Mills Home church. 

3. The Association is called to order by Moderator R. D. Covington for the 
transaction of business. 

4. Sam J. Smith of the Program Committee, read the outline of business forjj 
the session, which had been prepared by the committee, which was adopted. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 
Mills Home Church, Thomasville, N. C. 
September 3-4, 1935 

9:45 Praise and Worship 
10:00 Report of Program Committee 

10:10 Religious Literature Rev. E. F. Mumford 

10:30 Mills Home C. M. Wall 

11:15 Recognition of visitors, new pastors, appointment of committees 

11:30 Sermon Rev. Earl Bradley 

12:15 Lunch ^ 
1:30 Praise and Worship 

1:45 State of Churches Rev. L. S. Gaines 

1. One Minute Report from Each Church 

2. Digest of Church Letters (Blackboard) 

3. Associational Goals for 1936 (Blackboard) 
3:00 Cooperative Program: 

1. Ministerial Relief Rev. B. K. Mason 

2. Baptist Hospital Mrs. R. S. Greene 

3. Christian Education : p. c. Newton 

SECOND DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship 
10:00 Election of Officers and Business 

10:15 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. W. J, Griffin 

10:45 Cooperative Program (Con.) 

1. State Missions Mrs. R. A. Allen 

2. Home Missions Miss Roxie Sheets 

-.i -.r Foreign Missions Miss Sallie McCrackenfc 

11:15 Missionary Address Dr. Chas. E. Maddry 

12:15 Lunch 

1:30 Praise and Worship 

1:45 Temperance and Public Morals Rev J A Neilson 

o'ln l^^'i^^ S^'^eols - Rev"." Walter L. Warfford 

2:40 Baptist Training Union Williford Eddinger 

3:00 Reports of Committees, etc. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

5. The Report on Religious Literature was read by Rev. E. F. Mumford, 
istor of the Abbots Creek church. Upo nmotion to adopt the report it was dis- 
issed by Rev. Mumford and Rev. B. K. Mason, pastor of the New Friendship 
lurch. The Report was adopted. 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

Under religious literature or perhaps we should say Christian literature, we 
cluude Royal Service, Home and Foreign Field, Charity and Children and Bibli- 
,1 Recorder. 

Because of the interest our people have in the orphanage work, Charity and 
hildren has the largest circulation, but its circulation is not as large at it 
lould be, and the other periodicals mentioned should have a very large circula- 
pn among our people. This report is to deal chiefly with the Biblical Recorder, 
hich has been serving our people in this State and others for more than one 
andred years. The Biblical Recorder Publishing company, located at Raleigh, 
. C, is composed of sixty-four stockholders, all Baptist who are lending their 
:fluence to make the Recorder of interest to our people and to instruct them 
Dout our Baptist work. For a number of years they received no dividends but 
. later years they received six percent on the investment. Hov/ever, if it had not 
ien for other interests of the publishing company the Biblical Recorder would 
ave been suspended ten years ago. The paper is published at a deficit, but this 
as been tagen care of by rent from the Recorder Building and other resources. 

The paper has been and is a great asset to the Baptist denomination because 
' the knowledge and culture obtained by our people from its pages. 

The purpose of the Recorder is to give to the people information about all 
apartments of our work. Doctrinal questions are discussed, social questions have 
leir place, the Sunday School, general news about our work. Home, Foreign and 
tate Missions, all have their place in the paper. On all these things our people 
bkd knov/ledge. To read the Recorder makes on better informed about our 
ork and therefore more interested. A higher spiritual life is developed. The 
iading of no paper can do more to develop the moral and spiritual life of our 
'jung people. 

The price of the paper is 82.00 per year or SI. 00 for six months. There is 
neffort being put forth to increase the subscriptions to 25,000. The Woman's 
[issionary Union is undertaking during September and October to swell the sub- 
•ription list. 

May we all strive to aid in a greater circulation of the Recorder and to Cre- 
te a greater love for reading it. Its editor is J. S. Farmer. 

Respectfully submitted. 

E. F. MUMFORD. 

THE MILLS HOME 

6. The Report on The Hills Home was read by Miss Mary Misenheimer. and 
lioton for its adoption is duly made. 

Before the discussion of this report the audience was touched in a heart- 
ilt and m.ost delightful manner by the rendition of several songs by children of 
lie Mills Home. 

"Faith of Our Fathers" and "Can the World See Jesus in You?" were ren- 
'ered by Misses Ruby Byerly, Elma Harwood, Mary Bell Jarrell, and Iris Mae 
larbee. 

"Yes Jesus Loves Me", was given by two sm,all girls of Mills Hom.e. 

"Though Your Sins Be as Scarlet", was rendered by Robert Beasley, Wiley 
arrell, Roy Chatham and Johnnie Cummings. 

The Report was discussed by Miss Misenheimer, C. M. Wall and Rev. J. M 
lillard and was adopted. 

REPORT ON MILLS HOME, Inc. 

The Orphanage Movement was aroused in the minds and hearts of the Bap- 
ist Denomination by the appealing articles written by Drs. R. D. Fleming, W. 
L Gualtney, J. D. Hufhan and Columbus Durham in the Recorder. In July, 1884, 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Dr. Durham offered the following resolution through the Recorder to the Baptist 
Brotherhood : 

''In order, therefore, that this subject might be put in some definite and 
practical shape as early as possible, I move that J. H. Mills, W. R. Gualtney and 
R. D. Fleming be appointed a committee by the Baptist of North Carolina to 
make all necessary investigations and mature some recommendations to be pre- 
sented at the next session of the Baptist State Convention." 

Dr. J. D. Hufhan immediately seconded the motion. 

Liberty Association played no little part in endorsing the movement. Rev. 
S. H. Thompson was a delegate to Liberty Association which was meeting in 
Lexington. He offered a resolution, endorsing the movement of establishing a 
Baptist Orphanage in North Carolina. This was unanimously adopted with the 
exception of one brother, y^ho voted against it on the grounds that we were not 
able at this time to undertake the work. 

On November 12, 1884, the Baptist met in it's annual convention at the 
First Church in Raleigh and the proposition of establishing an orphanage seem- 
ed to be on the minds of almost all of the delegates. 

The motion was lost after a heated debate. The friends of the movement 
were greatly discouraged. It was five o'clock in the afternoon and Dr. Charles 
E. Taylor was on his way to Johnson Street depot to board the train for Wake 
Forest. In passing the First Baptist Church he found Mr. Mills sitting on the 
steps with tears plainly visible in his eyes. While they were talking other 
brethren came. Dr. Taylor proposed that the groups go into the pastor's study 
of the First Baptist Church and organize an orphanage association, then and 
there, and withdraw the whole matter from the Convention. The organization 
was affected. Dr. Taylor placed a dollar on the table. This dollar was the begin- 
ning of the long list of thousands who have since given freely of their means to 
help the orphans of North Carolina. 

Officers for the Association were elected as follows: 

President, J. C. Scarboro. 

Vice-President, R. R. Overby. i 
Secretary, Columbus Durham. 1 
The site was selected by Mr. Scarboro and the deed was made April 8, 
1885. The actual work in making preparations to build began on April 9. Dona- 
tions began coming in with Mr. Noah Biggs giving the first large amount. Mr. 
Watson followed with a check of $1,250.00. The first annual meeting of the 
Orphanage was held August 5, 1885. On November 11 of that year Rev. John 
Mitchell, for whom a building was named, came bringing with him a little orphan, 
named Mary Presson. She is now Mary Presson Yarborough, residing in Lexing- 
ton at this time. 

Up to the present time we have had four general superintendents — J. H. 
Mills, serving ten years; J. B. Boon, ten years; M. L. Kesler, twenty-seven years, 
and I. G. Greer, three years. The instiution has been very fortunate in the selec- 
tion of general superintendents. Each one seemed to be sent by the Lord for the 
particular period which they served. 

At the close of Mills' administration the total worth of the orphanage prop- 
erty was $25,000.00 compared with the valuation of $1,144,533.49 of December 31, 
1934. 

Within the past three years the orphanage has lost two of it's most com- 
neten and zealous leaders. They were recognized, not only by the Baptist but by 
all other denominations, as being two of the most efficient orphanage leaders in 
the south. Dr. Kesler, who was returning home from the western part of the 
State was killed by a train in Thomasville. He was succeeded by Mr. I. G. Grier 
of Boone, N. C, who was unanimously elected by the orphanage Board of Trus- 
tees. On December 27, 1934, Mr. Archibald Johnson laid down his pen, which 
had been used so effectually in forwarding the orphanage work. 

The Kennedy Home was taken over in May, 1912. The fifirst group of chil- 
dren was received in June. During the past year the denomination has cared 
for 545 children at Thomasville and 155 at the Kennedy Home — a total of 700. 
For the past fourteen years the policy of the Institution has been to try to keep 
families intact where they find the mother capable. This year funds were not 
available to do as much of this work as should have been done. 

This year there has been added forty-nine families with 189 children. The 



MINUTES OF THE 



9 



otal children now cared for by Mother's Aid, the Mills Home and Kennedy Home 
H 1,026. 

The Institution is greatly in need of more funds to carry on the work suc- 
;essfully. We have only made a small beginning in the Mother's Aid Work, 
^'unds are not available to care for a great many who should be in the orphanage. 
Ne urge every Sunday School of Liberty Association to give a worthy offering 
)nce a month and commence preparing for the Thanksgiving offering. Let us 
)ut aside one day's income, whether it be salary or income from business, for the 
Thanksgiving offering. We hope every Sunday School will supply each family 
vith a copy of Charity and Children, which has been and is the greatest agency 
inlaying the orphanage work on the hearts of the Baptists of North Carolina. 

The aim of the orphanage has always been to develop the child materially, 
spiritually and physically. The success of this is shown by the many children 
vho have become splendid citizens. 

Let us remember the words of our Lord, "For I was hungry, and Ye gave 
ne to eat; I was thirsty, Ye gave me to drink; I was a stranger and Ye took 
ne in". 

Respectively submitted, 
C. M. WALL. 

VISITORS RECOGNIZED 

7. The following visitors were recognized : 

Smith Hagerman, Supt. of Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem, N. C; Dr. 
3 .C. Risner, Winston-Salem, N. C; Dr. Brewer, President Meredith College; Mrs. 

B. Hambrick, Raleigh, N. C; Mr. C. A. Rhyne, Salisbury, N. C; Dr. Gordon, 
Spencer, N. C; Elbert M. Johnson, Mt. Olive, N. C; J. M. Hilliard, High Point, 
ST. C; T. J. Yelton from the Kings Mountain Association; Dr. Chas. E. Maddry, 
Ex. Sec'y. of the Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention; M. 
A.. Huggins, Sec'y. N. C. State Baptist Convention; Perry Morgan, S. S. Sec'y. N. 

State Baptist Convention; C. C. Smith, Moderator of the Piedmont Associa- 
;ion; Rev. Herman T. Stevens, Asheboro, N. C, and others. 

COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS BY THE MODERATOR 

8. The Moderator at this time appointed the following committees. 

Committee on Finance — L. E. Teague, chairman; Williford Eddinger, J. A. 
Kinney, B. J. May, E. E. Morgan. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher — J. W. Tuttle, chairman, C. C. 
Wrenn, Mrs. R. A. Allen, E. C. Roach, Miss Elizabeth Smith. 

Committee on Nominations — W. L. Warfford, chairman, Sam J. Smith, G. 
W. Miller, I. G. Green, L. S. Gaines. 

Committee to Nominate Officers for 1936 — C. M. Wall, Chairman, E. C. 
Roach, Miss Minnie Hayworth, W. L. Roach, Frank Foster. 

Committee on Obituaries — J. A. Millan, Chairman, Rev. Clyde Eddinger, 
Miss Roxie Sheets, J. N. Bowman, W. Vann Corrall. 

R. D. COVINGTON, Moderator. 

9. The new pastors of the Association were recognized at this time. For 
lames, see page 5. 

THE ANNUAL SERMON 

10. Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor of the Reeds, Jersey and Center Hill churches 
preached the Annual Sermon. His subject was, "The Great Commission of Our 
Lord and Jesus Christ", which was based on Scripture from the 13th Chapter of 
Matthew. 

The sermon was a masterful one and received much favorable comment. 

11. The Body adjourned at 12:15 to reconvene at 1:50 P. M. 



10 MINUTES OF THE 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

12. The Devotional is led by Rev. E. F. Mumford, pastor of the Abbott i 
Creek church. 

PLEASANT PLAINS CHURCH [' 

13. Application was made by delegates from Pleasant Plains, a newly oi 
ganized church in the bounds of the Association for admittance into the Body. 

Upon said application the Moderator appointed the following brethren as ■ 
Committee on Reception of Churches: Rev. H. T. Penry, G. W. Miller, and Joh: ] 
A. Kinney. 

STATE OF THE CHURCHES " 

14. Rev. L. S. Gaines, pastor of the First Church, Lexington, had super 
vision over this part of the program. Upon his call of the Roll of Churches, re f 
ports were made by the following persons : 

T. Carrick Teague for Abbotts Creek; G. R. Bean for Center Hill; W. 
Beck for Churchland; A. L. Snider for Denton; Rev. H. T. Penry for HollowaysJ 
Mrs. Ira A. Sharpe for Jersey; Sam J. Smith for Lexington; J. A. Kinney f o P' 
Lick Creek; Rev. J. A. Neilson for Mills Home; L. V. Miller for Liberty; Conra^l'^ 
Motsinger for New Friendship; J. F. Foster for Reeds; Miss Mozelle Clinard fo'°' 
Rich Fork; Clarence Cooper for Sheets Memorial; C. C. Wrenn for Stoners Grove, 
Rev, D. C. Darnell for Summerville; Mrs. T. B. Marlin for Tabernacle; Mrs. E^'' 
S. Greene for Thomasville; M. M. Smith for Wallburg; M. L. Craver for Welj^ 
come; Miss Vergie Gallim.ore for Walters Grove. ^ 

From the large Black Board prepared by the Committee on Digest of Churc'j'^ 
Letters Rev. Gaines compared the 1934 and 1935 gains or losses of the varior!" 
churches in their gifts to denominational objects. 

The following chart worked out by Rev. Gaines was adopted and ordered t J 

be printed in the minutes : ! 

II 

BUDGET PERCENTAGES AS SHOWN BY THE BLACKBOARD REPORT il 



1935 
Local 



**** Abbotts Creek 55% 

Carolina Avenue 96% 

Center Hill 84% 

* Churchland 74% 

Denton 80% 

*Holloways 74% 

* Jersey 67% 

***Lexington 51% 

Liberty 80% 

*Lick Creek 70% 

**Mills Home 41% 

*New Friendship 61% 

Reeds 91% 

Rich Fork 82% 

Sheets Memorial 85% 

Smith Grove 91% 

Southside 90% 

Stoners Grove 82% 

Surmnerville 89% 

Tabernacle 84% 

Taylors Grove 87% 

* Thomasville 72% 

* Wallburg 71% 

Welcome 84% 

Walters' Grove 85% 

Pleasant Plain 86% 



1934 1935 fi 

1934 Benom- Denomi- ^ 



Local iiiational inational L. 

61 39 45%*** 

97 3 4% 

75 25 16% 

84 16 26% 

86 14 20% 

74 26 26% 

97 3 33% 

66 2-3 33 1-3 49%*** 

92 8 20% 

77 23 30% 

29 71 59%** 

66 34 39% 

76 24 9% ^ 

87 13 18% ^ 

86 14 15% 

72 28 9% 

90 10 10% 

83 17 18% 

83 17 11% 

79 21 16% 

90 10 13% 

79 21 . 28% 

63 37 29% 

83 17 16% 

71 29 15% 

14% 



* Indicates churches with at least a 75% — 25%budget. 
** Best percentage. MILLS HOME. 
*** 2nd best percentage. LEXINGTON— FIRST. 
**** 3rd best percentage. ABBOTTS CREEK. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



THE STATE BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

15. The Report on Baptist Hospitals was read by Mrs. R. S. Greene, and 
)on motion to adopt was discussed by Smith Hagerman, Supt. of the Hospital 
; Winston-Salem, N. C, and Dr. H. C. Risner of Wmston-Salem and was adopted. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

The Baptist Hospital of North Carolina located at Winston-Salem has been 
veritable House of Hope to thousands who have entered its doors, diseased and 
ilpless, and thrugh its ministry have gone out to be a blessing to their families 
id communities through restored health. 

We are told that Jesus of Nazareth, who went about doing good, healed 
any that were sick. His ready sympathy manifested itself through his healing 
>wer whether the needy one was a leper standing by the roadside crying "Un- 
ean, Unclear", or the plea o fa nobleman saying "Some down ere my child 
e". So does our hospital receive patients of all classes. Last year 3,211 came 
r treatment and of this number about half had nothing with which to meet 
e expenses incident to their treatment. These received the same careful atten- 
on from skilful surgeons, doctors and nurses as those who were able to pay 
r every service. 

It should be counted a rare privilege that on each Mother's Day the Bap- 
sts of our State are given the opportunity to share in the ministry to these 
^edy ones. The joy of seeing one mother with restored health, reunited with her 
imily should prove sufficient incentive to inspire us to larger giving for this 
iirpose. Our hospital should stand side by side with our orphanage in our love 
rid devotion, and it is not too much that we ask our people to set aside one day's 
ork to be given on Mother's Day. We recommend also that our people of 
ieans give preference to this institution founded and controlled by Baptists. 
Without the patronage of this class it could not continue operation. Many out- 
ide of our denomination have been treated and have gone away satisfied and 
ifeased with the ministratin received. We covet their continued favor and good 
jill. Denominational loyalty should impel Baptists to give their support when- 
TBY hospitalization is needed for here they will find the best of equipment and in 
jrvice. 

Our hospital extends a helping hand both to those in need and to those 
L better circumstances. Will we not give to ti our hearty support, thus show- 
^g love to our neighbor in need and meriting the plaudit of our Savior, "I was 
ck and ye ministered unto me"? 

i The answer rests in the hands of the people called Baptists. May their 

ands be opened and their hearts ready to respond. 

I Respectfully submitted, 

I MRS. R. S. GREEN. 

ADDRESS BY M. A. HUGGINS, SECY. BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

16. Mr. M. A. Huggins delivered and address at this time, in which he 
:ressed the eminent importance of all Baptist churches embracing the entire pro- 
ram of the Denomination. 

ADDRESS BY DR. CHAS. E. BREWER 

17. A most masterful address on Christian Education was delivered at this 
me by Dr. Chas. E. Brewer, President of Meredith College. 

18. The Body adjourned at 4:00 P. M. to reconvene at 7:30 P. M. 

EVENING SESSION 

19. The Devotional is conducted by I. G. Greer, Supt. of the Mills Home. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

20. The Report on Christian Education was read by J. A. McMillan, editor 
f Charity and Children at the Mills Home. 

The audience is made up mainly of children of The Mills Home. Mr. Mc- 
[illan explains to them the method of proceedure in a district association and 
lakes motion that the Report be adopted, which was done. 

Rev. Hoyt Blackwell delivered at this time a most thrilling address on 
hristian Education. 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Without knowledge the people perish. Knowledge unlearned of Christian- 
ity is worse than ignorance. Education may or may not be good for a people. 
Education without Christianity has destroyed more than one nation. The United 
States is a great nation, not because of her natural resources, but because of her 
people. Her people are great because of the building that was erected in the 
midst of every community. In the first years, it was made of logs and was used 
as a school house during the week and as a house of worship on Sunday. The 
teacher, who was often also the preacher, made America great. Our Baptist peo- 
ple have never departed from that practice. They have not put asunder what 
God has joined together — Education and Religion. 

If a people would remain free there must be absolute academic freedom. 
The windows and doors of our schools and colleges must remain wide open tO; 
every truth from whatever source that truth might come. Our Baptist collegesi 
are free to seek after truth. We Baptist people are not afraid of the truth, be-! 
cause our Great Teacher has said that the Truth will make us free. It is His 
truth wherever found. 

This freedom that is essential to a free people is found only in a Christian 
college and reaches as near perfection in a Baptist college as anywhere on earth. 
It is only the ignorant who say that Christian educaitno is no more. In seeking 
truth, the Christian college does not bar the Bible, and Baptist colleges open iti 
wide and listen while It speaks. 

There is only space to mention the names of our five colleges that arei 
owned, controlled, and operated by the Baptist State Convention: Wake ForestJ 
Meredith, Chowan, Mars Hill and Campbell. To these, we would add the thredj 
Junior Colleges that are owned by smaller groups of Baptists: Boiling Springs: 
Wingate and Fruitland. 1| 

Our convention joints the conventions of other Southern states in maintain-i 
ing: The Southern Baptist Seminary, The Southwestern Seminary, The Baptisti 
Bible Institute and the Woman's Training School. AH of these, with their loca-J 
tions, are well known. 

Our future as a denomination depends upon our support of these institutions 
of learning. Let us support them with our prayers, our money and with our 
sons and daughters. J. A. McMILLAN. 

21. Upon motion the Body adjourned at 9:00 P. M. to reconvene tomorrow 
morning at 9:45 A. M. 

THE SECOND DAY 
Wednesday, September 4, 1935 i 

22. The devotional is conducted by Rev. W. K. McGee, pastor of the First 
church, Thomasville, N. C. 1 

During this devotional the hearts of the audience were made glad by songs; 
rendered by the Misses Ruby Byerly, Elma Harward, Mary Bell Jarrell and Irisj 
Mae Barbee and the boys chorus composed of Robert Beasley, Wiley Jarrell, Roy| 
Cheatham and Johnnie Cummings. These all from the Mills Home. i 

THE ELECTION OF OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEAR I 

23. The Committee heretofore appointed by the Moderator to nominate of-i 
ficers made the following report: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1936 

We recommend: 

For Moderator — R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C. 

For Vice Moderator — G. W. Miller, Lexington, N. C. 

For Clerk and Treasurer — Sam J. Smith, Lexington, N. C. 

C. M. WALL, W. C. ROACH, J. F. FOSTER, 

E. C. Roach, Committee to Nominate Officers for 1936.| 

Upon motion of C. M. Wall of Lexington, N. C, I. G, Greer, Supt. of Mills 
Home was instructed to cast the vote of the Body for the above named persons 
as officers for next year. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 

24. The Committee on time, place and preacher reported as follows, which 
J vas adopted by the Body. 

' REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER FOR 
[| THE 1936 SESSION 

Time — Tuesday and Wednesday after First Sunday in September, 1936. 
II Place — Reeds church, Lexington, N. C. 

Preacher — L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 

jt Alternate Preacher — J. A. Neilson, Thomasville, N. C. 

SPRING SESSION 

1 Time— Friday, April 27. 
Place— Center Hill. 
Preacher— Rev. W. K. McGhee. 

J. W. TUTTLE, C. C. WRENN, E. C. ROACH, ELIZABETH 
SMITH, MRS. R. A. ALLEN, Committee on Time, Place and Preacher. 

REPORT ON W. M. U. 

25. The Report on W. M. U. was read by Mrs. W. J. Griffin of the New 

friendship church. 
Upon motion to adopt it was discussed by Mrs. Griffin after which it was 
idopted. 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Association held its annual 
neeting in April with the New Friendship Church. The attendance was good 
md the reports showed marked progress in the work along many lines. Mrs. J. 
B. Hipps, one of our Missionaries to Shanghai, China; Mrs. B. K. Mason, leader 
^' 'Df this division; and Miss Mary Currin, the recently elected state young people's 
'jieader, were our visiting speakers. The message brought by each was truly in- 
Ji^pirational. All the officers were re-elected with the exception of the young peo- 
jble's leader. Miss Ola Crowder, route 5, Winston-Salem, N. C, was chosen as 
yroung people's leader. The meeting next year will be with the Lexington church. 

Our watchword for the year is: "In the name of our God we will set up our 
oanners." The hymn is "Fling Out the Banner". 

Of the 28 churches in our Association, 17 have at least one missionary or- 
3:anization. Seven maintain full graded unions. One church having a full graded 
union reached the A-1 standard in each organization in 1934, making two A-1 
full graded unions in the division and fifteen in the state, according to the last 
report. 

The stewardship contest was held on August 18th with only a small number 
>f our young people taking part. Others had planned and prepared to enter the 
contest but were prevented because of the infantile paralysis epidemic. Six con- 
testants from this Association are planning to enter the divisional contest in 
Salisbury in September. There the contest will close for all the organizations 
except the Y. W. A. The state Y. W. A. winner will go to Ridgecrest next sum- 
mer to compete in the south-wide contest. The last south-wide contest was held 
at Ridgecrest on June 26th with 16 of the 18 states of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vrention entering a contest. The winner was Miss Virginia Wingo, of Louisiana. 

A number of our people visited Ridgecrest this summer and came in contact 
with our state and south-wide workers and many of our missionaries. These work- 
ers and missionaries somehow have a way of making their missionary zeal con- 
tagious. These persons have come back to our Association with visions broadened 
and purposes deepened. 

The Hundred Thousand Club is quietly, gently but surely doing much to 
erase the debts on our boards. Dr. Frank Tripp reminds us that these debts will 
not be paid out of our surplus. Few debts are paid that way. Our debts have a 
claim on our income until they are paid. Many of our people have joined this 
dollar a month extra and above club, and I feel sure there are others who would 
]oin if they were often informed of the purpose and accomplishments of this plan. 

It delights our hearts to know that many useful gifts have been sent to Mr. 
and Mrs. Ismael Negrin, two of our very worthy missionaries in Cruces, Cuba. 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



Mr. and Mrs. Negrin report that five new Sunday Schools have recently been or- 
ganized and that children actually clamor for the Sunday School leaflets to carry 
home. Leaflets are passed out to Sunday School No. 1, but must be taken from 
the children to be used in Sunday School No. 2, and so on. Would it not mean 
much if this literature could go into their homes? The real burden of the work 
in Cruces is not lack of children or lack of interest but lack of literature. One 
church in this Association, through the sponsorship of the W. M. U., has sent two 
small checks in payment of Sunday School literature for Cruces. 

Last year's reports show 1,497 members in all. the W. M. U. organizations 
and of these only 560 were enrolled in some Mission Study Course. This is far 
short of half. "If the iron be blunt and he do not whet the edge, then must he be 
put to more strength: But wisdom is profitable to direct" — Lcc. 10: 10. Do we 
not need to "whet" the edge of our mental equipment for the task at hand in our 
own church and association? Are we not guilty of thinking it useless to "whet" 
the axe even though we know that "whetting" will make far faster and better [J 
cutting? Even the keenest witted need frequent "whetting". Prominent among 
the whetstones are our Mission Study Books. There are books on missionary 
methods, stewardship and prayer. Also, many other books which give us true 
pictures f our missionaries and the various fields in which Southern Baptists are 
at work. Will the pastors, W. M. U. presidents and Mission Study leaders not 
put forth a special effort to have a Church School of Missions in each church at 
least once a year? When our young people see the pastors, Sunday School super- 
intendents, teachers and W. M. U. leaders all missionary-minded and lined up for 
the cause, will they fail to join the ranks and live true to the example set? One 
example is worth a thousand arguments, you know. 

When shall we' awake and fling out our banners for Christ? 

Respectfully submitted, ' 
MRS. W. J. GRIFFIN. 
COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

26. The Report on State Mission was read by Mrs. R. A. Allen of Denton 

N. C. 

The Report on Home Missions was read by Miss Roxie Sheets of Lexing 
ton, N. C. 

The Report on Foreign Missions was read by Miss Sallie McCracken of The j 
Mills Home. j 

Upon motion to adopt these three reports the audience was again made glad \ 
by songs from the Mills Home boys and girls, whose names have been given here- 
tofore. 

ADDRESS BY DR. CHAS. E. MADDRY 

Dr. Chas. E. Maddry, Ex. Secy, of the Foreign Mission Board of the South- 
ern Baptist Convention delivered at this time the most stirring address of the 
Association. 

Many times as he told of the sacrifices and hardships of the missionaries 
on the foreign fields and of the anxiousness of the foreigners, especially the 
Chinese to hear and receive the Gospel, tears were in the eyes of almost every 
person in the audience. 

After his address the three reports were adopted. 

STATE MISSIONS 
The work of State Missions has come to embrace many interests and activi- 
ties. In the beginning the emphasis was almost wholly on aiding weak and strug- 
gling churches in strategic centers. This was almost the sole interest until about 
25 years ago. During the years hundreds of churches have been helped and some 
of them have become our strongest ones. For example. First Church in Greens- 
boro. 

The major object was to evangelize N. C. and the task is incomplete but 
the people of other denominations have marvelled at our growth. 

I will mention a few of the activities State Missions embrace: 
1. Aid to Churches: Aid by way of pastor's salary to weak churches and 
churches in strategic centers. At present more than 50 missionary pastors are 
ministering to 130 churches. There is at least 50 fields of churches — that is 200 
churches counting 4 to a field that is in need of help from the board. At present 
the majority of these are in the East butthere is just as great a need for help 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



1 the West. Scores and scores of pastors have to farm or do other work in order 
: meet the physical necessities of their families. And the thing to remember is 
lat the pastors are not suffering in proportion to the people for their physical 
eeds are met but what about the spiritual need of the people. They miss the 
astor's visit and that personal touch that means so much to them. 

Not only pastor's are aided but at present several churches are being aided 
1 their building program. Three of these are in Educational centers. The 
oard says they have on file scores of applications where if they could let them 
ave as much as $5000 it would encourage the people to raise $10,000 to $15,000. 
Vhile Baptists in towns and cities have built commodious churches, the villages 
nd country have not made much advance. As we ride up and down the highways 
f N. C. and contract the difference between our fine school buildings and our 
ountry churches our heart is distressed. Does the difference between the church 
nd the school building suggest our real feeling about the importance of training 
le mind on the one hand and the development of the spirit on the other. 

2. Dept. of S. S.: The growth of S. S. in N. C. has been very gratifying, 
'his department is headed by Mr. Perry Morgan with L. L. Morgan as assistant, 
'hey are constantly stimulating S. S. interest. Teacher training and importance 
f organization. In addition to their regular work carried on through the year, 
pecial emphasis is placed on S. S. revivals during the summer. This season 334 
hurches were reached with an enrollment of 24,500. Many notable advances 
ave been made, particularly with reference to equipment. 

3. B. Y. P. U. : Miss Winnie Rickett has charge of this department with 
liss Mabel Starnes as assistant and they are going from church to church aiding 
nd stimulating the young people in the B. Y. P. U. organizations and then 
hrough the district associations and state meetings they reach scores each year. 

4. There are some 3 to 4000 boys and girls go to our colleges each year 
ther than Baptist schools. This time when the boys and girls are away from the 
nfluence of the home and the home church and most trying and yet the most im- 
lortant in their lives. This is the time they are really to be spiritually guided. 
?he State Board is able help only 2 of the churches located at state institutions. 
)Ome years ago we had at practically every one o f them a student secretary 
vho was constantly visiting the students and trying to interest them in spiritual 
iving and service for their Master. At present we have only one, Miss Cleo 
/[itchell with headquarters at Greensboro. She divides her time between Greens- 
)oro, Cullowhee and Boone. This is known as the student work. 

5. Oteen: Here we have Mr. W. W. Williams who visits and ministers 
veek by week and day by day to the boys who are lingering here in the hospital, 
le is also pastor of a wide-awake church and is a great help to the mothers and 
athers who come to visit their boys. Other states have recognized this wonderful 
•pportunity and are now co-operating with N. C. and making it possible for Bro. 
Villiams to stay there. 

Some work is being done among the Negroes and Indians, but not near as 
nuch as the Denomination should do. 

MRS. R. A. ALLEN. 
HOME MISSION REPORT 1935 

The work of the Home Mission Board during the past year has been such 
is to encourage our people. From the different fields have come reports of many 
•evivals and many additions to the churches. More than 200 missionaries are at 
vork maintaining Mission Stations and preaching places. The Board operates 
;he Southern Baptist Sanitorium at El Paso, Texas. For nearly five years it has 
3aid its operating expenses. The building and loan department has nearly one 
md a quarter million loaned to churches. The Board has managed its finances 
3o well that it has pushed the mission work without added indebtedness and also 
lecreased its debts. The Woman's Missionary Union gave nearly $95,000 during 
;he 1934 March Week of Prayer and Annie Armstrong offering. These annual 
)fferings of the women made it possible for the Board to maintain its work, and 
X) send out 36 new missionaries in the field in 1934. The receipts from the Hun- 
ired Thousand Club has made it possible for the Board to so readjust its debts 
;hat it will be able to handle them and carry on its mission work. 

The Board received in 1934 over $81,000 more than in 1933, and we hope 
L935 will show just as great advancement. And now may we stop for a moment 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



and turn our eyes toward the future! Changes are taking place all around us i 
The old Frontiers of Home Missions have changed with a changing world, anc b 
new Frontiers are taking their places. While other things have changed, Jesus )n 
Christ and the plan of Salvation and the need of sinners for Salvation, has no1 
changed. There are on every hand signs of spiritual darkness. Evils of manj 
kinds are increasing. Evils that unless checked will eventually undermine oui 
civilization. What is the remedy? The only hope is Christ and His Gospel. The gj 
appeal that he made to his followers long ago, when He said ; ''Lift up your eyes 
and look upon the fields that are white unto harvest," is being made to us today 
There are millions of souls, white and black, Jew and Gentile, rich and poor, oui 
of Christ here in our home land. They are crying for the bread of life. Musi 
they cry in vain? 

MISS ROXIE SHEETS. 
REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Perhaps no more encouraging report on foreign missions has been made ir 
many years than we are able to present this year. The representatives that visit- 
ed many of the mission fields during the past several months bring marvelous 1 
reports of the work of the missionaries, their untiring efforts to hold together the c 
work and present the gospel to the lost millions; their renewed faith in the prom- 
ises of God, and their abounding liberality to the cause so dear to their hearth, 
They also picture to us the teeming thousands anxious and waiting to hear the 
gospel. Many of these missionaries have held on under great difficulties; some^ 
having to remain at their posts of duty when furloughs were long past due, and; 
others who had passed the years of retirement, but unwilling to leave until others 
could come to take their places ; most of them with buildings and equipment much| 
in need of repair and wholly inadequate to their needs. However, the missionaries! 
of Europe and the Orient seem greatly encouraged by the visit of our Foreignl' 
Mission Secretary, Dr. Maddry, who has just returned from these fields and is| 
awakening anew the interest of our own people in the cause of foreign missions 
as he brings first-hand information of what he saw and felt as he visited the' 
various mission fields. 

Surely if there was ever a time for Southern Baptists to awake and believe 
the promises of God and accept his great commission it is now. We have been 
handicapped by the enormous debt on the Board, but it is most gratifying and 
encouraging to note the reduction on that from month to month. On January 
first, 1935, the debt was $924,500.00. At the end of July it had been reduced to 
$566,500.00. Funds for this debt reduction did not all come from contributions. 
Valuable property in Italy had to be sold and part of this money was applied on 
the debt. About fifty thousand dollars also came from the Hundred Thousand 
Club. Every effort is being put forth to reduce the debt as rapidly as possible. 
The truth that "God helps those who help themselves" has been verified in the 
fact that our bankers seeing the great effort to lift the debt have reduced the 
rate of interest from six to five per cent. 

Foreign Mission Week at Ridgecrest, August 12-18, was one of the most 
delightful weeks ever spent by Southern Baptists. The 91 missionaries present 
with their faces and hearts aglow with love and devotion to their work often 
held their audiences spell-bound as they related some of their experiences. These 
meetings from day to day revealed to Southern Baptists that they have among 
their missionaries some of the most intellectual, cultured and devout Christians 
to be found anywhere. 

Seven new missionaries have been appointed and a few others recommended 
to be appointed at the next meeting of the Board. This, however, does not en- 
large our work, but simply supplies workers where some have been retired or have 
to leave on account of ill health. The Board promises not to enlarge the work 
until the debt is paid, though the plea for better equipment and enlargement of 
the work is almost irresistible. 

This year the centennial of Baptist mission work in China is being cele- 
brated,for it was in 1835 that Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Shuck took up the work there. 
It is said that it was Robert Morrison's fair dream that in one hundred years 
there would be a thousand Christians in China. But when we learn that there are 
more than 70,000 Baptists, not counting the members of other denominations we 
are constrained to exclaim: "What hath God wrought"! J 

SALLIE L. McCRACKEN. | 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



27. Rev. Herman T. Stevens of Asheboro, N. C, Moderator of the Randolph 
;30ciation at this time led the Body in a Special Prayer that we as a Demonia- 
n mighl see more fully our duties to our foreign neighbors. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES 

28. The Committee on Obituaries at this time made their report through 
3ir chairman, Rev. J. A. McMillan. 

While the audience stood out of respect of its deceased members, prayer 
LS made by Rev. McMillan. 

For this list of names, see page 22. 

29. The Body adjourned at 12:30 p. m. to reconvene at 1:30 p. m. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

30. The devotional was led by Rev. Clyde Eddinger, pastor of the Welcome 
urch. 

"Not My Will But Thine Be Done", was .rendered in song by Miss Ruby By- 
[y. Miss Elma Harward, Miss Mary Bell Jarrell and Miss Iris Mae Barbee 
>m Mills Home. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 

31. The Committee on Nominations made the following report, which was 
opted : 

Orphanage Representative — Miss Mary Misenheimer, Lexington, N. C. 
PROGRAM COMMITTEE FOR 1936 

The Moderator and Clerk of the Association, Pastor of the church with 
lich the next session meets — W. L. Warfford, Lexington. 

Committee on Digest of Church Letters for 1936 — Sam J. Smith, Lexington, 
C; Rev. Walter L. Warlford, Lexington, N. C, and J. A. Neilson, Thomas- 
le. 

L G. GREER, L. S. GAINES, W. L. WARFFORD, SAM. J. 

SMITH, G. W. Miller, Committee on Nominations. 

For those elected to make reports next year, see page 2. 

RECEPTION OF PLEASANT PLAINS CHURCH 

32. The committee heretofore appointed to investigate the application of 
easant Plains church for admittance into the Association, recommended that 
be received. The recommendation of the committee is adopted. 

MISS SOPHIE LANNEAU 

33. Miss Sophie Lanneau, a returned Missionary from China gave to the 
>dy some facts concerning Chinese Mission schools, with which she had been 
nnected for many years. 

MINUTES DEDICATED TO MEMORY OF ARCHIBALD JOHNSON 

34. G. W. Miller of Lexington made a motion that the 1935 Minutes of the 
ssociation be dedicated to the memory of the late Archibald Johnson and that a 
t of Mr. Johnson be carried in the front pages of the Minutes. The motion was 
opted. 

REPORT ON LAW ENFORCEMENT AND PUBLIC MORALS 

35. Rev. J. A. Neilson read the Report on Public Morals and Law enforce- 
mt; upon motion to adopt, the report was discussed by Rev. McCoin, of the 
lited Dry Forces of the State. After which the report was adopted and a 
llection taken for the use of said agency. 

TEMPERANE AND PUBLIC MORALS 

Temperance and public morals should demand the attention of Christians 
erywhere, but from all appearances, these things are being ignored by many 
our Baptist people. That conditions are bad, morally, they admit; in fact, 
ey regret, and lament, and deplore; hands are raised in holy horror at the 
ckedness that is going on about them — and there the matter rests. 
This business of coming together once a year, and stating a few facts which 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



reveal the evils of drinking, gambling, dancing, lynching, and the like, may be all 
right from an associational standpoint, but is it getting us anywhere The facts 
as they are usually presented form a good report, and that report looks fine 
when recorded in the minutes of our association, but who reads the minutes 
after they are printed? And how many of those who haard the original report 
can tell you a week or a month later what they heard? And when they have 
read or heard how things stand morally, what have they done about it? It is 
certain that we do not need this report to tell us how thmgs are in the realm of 
morals. The daily papers keep us informed, and if we do not read the papers, 
just a casual look about us will reveal the fact that things are not what they 
ought to be. And the thing that should touch us to the quick is that we do not 
have to go beyond the limits of the church life to observe the low state into 
which we have fallen morally. Too long has the church winked a condoning eye 
at the evils within her own walls; too long has she shrugged an indifferent 
shoulder at the sins being committed by those within her membership. The feel- 
ings of those involved, their social standing, (think of it!) their financial sup- 
port, these are evidently of more importance than the building up of God's King- 
dom, of more importance than a strict adherence to the principles for which the 
church stands. 

As long as we tolerate loose living on the part of church members, we 
will be laughed to scorn by the world when we make any attempt to regulate the 
morals of tnose outside the church. What right have we to even suggest washing 
the linen of some one else as lorg as our own linen remains dirty? As someone 
has truly said: "THE CHURCH CANNOT MAKE THE WORLD BETTER 
UNLEfc^S THE CHURCH IS BETTER THAN THE WORLDS 

Think of the thousands of Christians who have failed to exercise their 
prerogative as citizens in the cause of the vote, while many of those who have 
voted, have allowed their Christian convictions to be over-ruled by their political 
convictions. This ought not to be. 

Again, how many Christian parents there are who have failed to live up 
to their responsibilities, and have done absolutely nothing to shape or guide the. 
thinking of their children, morallY, but have left them wholly exposed to the 
influence of the popular magazines, "the moving picture shows and the radio. 

One great mistake we made as Christians v^^as when we stopped teaching 
temperance, think that Prohibition was a cure-all, that it would work miracles. 
So we went to sleep on the job while the devil's crowd got busy. 

The trouble with Prohibition was not altogether the lack of proper enforce- 
ment on the part of those in authority, nor the corruption of those in office,, but 
rather the failure on the part of the Christian people to grasp this fundamental 
principle, that it is much mre effective to train a person not to want a certain 
thing, than it is to tell him he cannot have it. Christ's special work was not to tell 
men what to do, but to make itpossible for them to do it. 

The time to stop a leak is not after the dam has burst, and the flood has 
left ruin and desolation in its wake, but when the water first begins to seep 
through in tiny rivulets. 

Our hope lies in the children of this generation as well as in the children 
of generations yet unborn. Many of us have either overlooked or ignored what 
has been spoken in the Word: ''Train up a child in the way he should go, and 
when he is old he will not depart fromit." 

We cannot hops to reform the world or regulate its morals as long as human 
hearts remain unregenerate. Christ did not do it in His day; we need not expjct 
to in ours. 

But this we can do with God's help: We can keep our own lives unspotted 
from the world, and stand four-square against these present day evils. We can 
heed the scriptural injunctions: "Abhor that which is evil, cleave to that which 
is good. Come out from among them and be ye separate." 

We need a heaven-sent spiritual revival which will result in a clean pulpit 
and a clean pew; a deeper realization on the part of parents, teachers, and 
preachers, of their responsibility towards the children and young people committed 
to their care; the definite, consistent, and persistent teaching of children and 
young people regardmg temperance and public morals; the arousing in the hearts 
and minds of Christians of a strong sentiment against those things which are 

I 



19 



demoralizing, degrading, and debasing, and which are sapping the moral and 
spiritual life from our people. 

In the name of Christ and His church, in the name and for the sake of all 
that is decent, and pure, and holy, let us take up the challenge, and meet it in a 
way that is worthy of Him who loved us and gave Himself for us, and who alone 
of all men was able to look the world in the face and say: ''Which of you con- 
victeth me of sin?" 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. NEILSON. 

B. T. U. 

36. The Report on B. T. U. was read by Wilford Eddinger of the Rich Fork 
church, which was adopted without discussion. 

B. T. U. REPORT 

Comparing the records of 1934 with those of 1935, we find that the gross 
need of our association is the revival of the Associational B. T. U. which has 
been dormant for the past two or three years. This organization not only helps 
to organize new unions, but helps and inspires the unions in their work. 

In 1934 we had, out of a total of 27 churches, 16 church with one or more 
B. T. U. Unions, with a total of 55 unions and a combined membership of 978. 
In 1935 we have, out of 26 churches, 14 churches with one or more B. T. U. Un- 
ions, with a total of 53 unions and a combined membership of 923. A decrease 
in unions of 2 and a decrease in membership of 46. 

The amount of interest manifest by the adults is revealed by the fact that 
i nl934 we had only 4 B. T. U. Unions with an enrollment of 33 members. In 
1935 we have 7 B. T. U.'s with 83 members enrolled. This shows an increase in 
unions of 3 and an increase in enrollment of 50 menibsrs. 

In 17 Senior B. Y. P. U.'s in 1934 were enrolled 298 members. This year 
we have only 13 Senior B. Y. P. U.'s, with an enrollment of 222, a decrease in 
unions of 4 and a decrease in members of76. 

The Intermediates made no increase or decrease in number of unions this 
year from last, but made a very commendable increase in members over last 
year of 44. May we encourage this vast army of young people in their field of 
endeavor. 

Since the last time the association met we have decreased in number of 
Junior Unions from 17 to 16. The membership of the Junior Unions have shown 
a decided decrease in enrollment also. In 1934 we had 338 members. This year 
we have lost 76 members, making the total enrollment 262. 

In making this report I would not try to impress upon your minds the fact 
that the B. T: U. cause is a lost cause. I would rather impress upon your minds 
the fact that there is a great amount of good work being accomplished in our 
association by our individual B. T. U. Unions. You m.erely have to observe to 
see that there is a great Spiritual work going on in our churches with B. T. U. 
organizations. 

I challenge you young people not to give up in despair, but come to a fuller 
realization that the harvest is ripe. 

Pastors, m.ost of all, I challenge you to go back to your respective churches 
and say to your young people as Paul said to Timothy: "Study to show thyself 
approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing 
the wrd of truth." 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILFRED R. EDDINGER. 

37. Mr. Wilford Eddinger upon motion by Rev. Walter Warff ord was elected 
as Associational organizer to organize an Associational B. T. U. 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

38. Rev. W. L. Warfford, of the Sheets Memorial church read the report on 
Sunday Schools, which was adopted. 

REPOR ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

In the Great Commission Jesus placed strong emphasis on teaching. "Go ye 
therefore, and teach, (make disciples) of all nations, baptizing them in the name 
of the Father, and the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe 



20 



MINUTES OF THE 



all things whatsoever I have commanded you." (Matt:19ff). In obedience to 
this command we maintain the Sunday School as the Bible teaching agency of the 
church. 

The crying need of the world today is a better understanding of the teach- 
ings and principles of life set forth in God's Holy Word. The Sunday School 
is the greatest agency known to the world for that purpose. It includes all 
people of all ages. The Bible is its fundamental text book. The work of the 
Sunday School teacher is primarily that of interpretation of God's Word. A 
good interpreter is one who does everything possible to get into his or her own 
mind the teachings and principles of God's Word, and then present and transmit 
them UNCHANGED into the mind of the pupil. What a mission and what a task 
is that of the Sunday School teacher! 

There are now 25 churches in the Liberty Association with a combined 
membership of 6,490. There are now 25 Sunday Schools and two Mission Sunday 
Schools with a combined membership of 6,271. The average attendance for the 
year is only 3920! Note that the Sunday School enrollment is now 218 less 
that of the church membership, and that the Sunday School enrollment has de- 
creased 360 during the year, an average of one a day! (That is aside from the 
loss involved in the two churches from this Association that has joined the Ran- 
dolph Association.) 

There are some very fundamental needs of our Sunday School work to which 
I call attention. These needs are as follows: Enlargement, trained teachers and 
general improvement of Sunday School work in the association. Surely we need 
a program of enlargement when we are losing in enrollment at the rate of one 
a day; when there are only about 3920 average attendance in Sunday School 
from Sunday to Sunday; when there are at least 4,000 possibilities in the Associa- 
tion inactive and the larger part unenlisted in our association. 

During the past year we have made at least a step toward the solution of 
this problem in the organization of the Associational Sunday School. We had 
further hoped to meet some of the problems through the proposed Sunday School 
Revival. While we have not been able to accomplish all that we would like to 
accomplish, yet there are certain suggestions that are worthy and helpful. Let 
us set as our goal for this associational year to have a 10 per cent increase in 
enrollment and average attendance. Let us meet the need of trained workers 
by having at least four training courses in all our churches during the year 
beginning with an Associational-wide Sunday School Training Course in all the 
churches not later than the first week in October. Let us meet the need of bet- 
ter and improved Sunday School work by a more adequate use of the principles 
set forth in the Standard of Excellence. 

The challenge is before us. What will we do about it? Will you be content 
to further retreat? Are you willing to sit by and do nothing about the tremendous 
responsibility and possibility of growth and development that is before us? 
Awake, arise and out to the task before us! 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER L. WARFFORD. 

Addresses on Sunday Schools, training and teaching were made by Perry 
Morgan of the State Sunday School Board of the Denomination and by Dr. Clay 
I. Hudson of the Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

39. Sam J. Smith, Treas. of the Association made his report for last year, 
which was adopted. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



TREASURER'S REPORT LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
YEAR ENDING AUGUST 31st, 1935 
RECEIPTS 

Abbotts Creek $ 6.00 

Carolina Avenue 3.50 

Center Hill 2.50 

Churchland 6.00 

Denton 6.50 

Gravel Hill 1.00 

Holloways 3.00 

Jersey 6.15 

Lexington 28.00 

Liberty 3.00 

Lick Creek 3.20 

New Friendship 6.54 

Mills Home 12.00 

Reeds 5.00 

Rich Fork 4.00 

Smith Grove 3.50 

Southside 3.00 

Stoners Grove :. 4.00 

Summerville 2.00 

Tabernacle 5.00 

Taylors Grove 1.00 

Thomasville 16.00 

Wallburg i 5.00 

Walters Grove 1.35 

Welcome 3.00 

Westfield 2.00 

Sheets Memorial 5.00 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $148.24 

Disbursements 

Paid Dispatch, Printing Minutes $100.00 

The Dispatch for cut of Jersey Church 3.92 

Postage 3.58 

Mills Home (Charity and Children) for Programs 4.50 

Phone Calls 80 

Paid Sam J. Smith, Balance on 1933 Act 21.60 

Retained for My Service as Clerk 13.84 

Total Disbursements $148.24 

Balance due Sam J. Smith, as Clerk $ 16.16 

SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer. 

40. The Association adjourned at 4:15 P. M. to meet with the Reeds church, 
Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3, next year. 

R. D. COVINGTON, SAM J. SMITH, 

Moderator. Clerk. 



22 



MINUTES OF THE 



IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE WHO HAVE ANSWERED 
THE ROLL CALL SINCE OUR LAST SESSION 

"Blessed are the Dead, which die in the Lord" 
"In My Father's House are Many Mansions" 



ABBOTTS CREEK— 
Mrs. Florena Farabee 
Mrs. Carrie Motsinger 

CENTER HILL— 

Mrs. F. D. Michael, 
Mrs. Amanda Styers. 

CHURCHLAND— 
Mr. L. F. Barnes, 
Mr. Ira Lomax, 
Mrs. Mary Beck. 

DENTON— 

Mrs. Clara Snider, 
Deacon W. B. Russell, 
Deacon W. T. Tysinger. 

HOLLOWAYS— 
Mr. Brice Briggs, 
Mr. B. P. Carrick, 
Mr. John Shaw. 

JERSEY— 

Mrs. Eliza Spaugh. 

LEXINGTON— 
Mrs. L. A. Martin, 
Mrs. Amelia Conrad, 
Mr. E. O. Zimmerman, 
Mr. Jno. K. Hankins, 
Mr. J. H. Cross, 
Mrs. W. L. Yarbrough, 
Mrs. J. F. Fansler, 
Mrs. W. T. Grubb. 

LICK CREEK— 
Deacon J. M. Cole, 
Mrs. Ellen Skeen. 

MILLS HOME— 

Miss Mary Cook. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— 

Mr. Ed F. Tesh. 



REEDS— 

Deacon C. M. Foster, 

Mrs, John May. 
RICH FORK— 

Mrs. Lucinda Eaton, 

Mrs. Felix Everhart, 

Mr. Mack Eddinger, 

Mrs. Thomas Everhart, 

Mr. L. J. Shuler. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL— 

Louise Bean, 

Mrs. James Cooper. 
SMITH GROVE— 

Mr. N. W. Koonts. 
SOUTHSIDE— 

Ten reported; names not given. 
STONERS GROVE— 

Mrs. G. R. Loflin, 

Mrs. B. F. Roach. 
SUMMERVILLE— 

Mrs. Alvin Peterson, 

Mr. Tom Gallimore. 
TABERNACLE— 

Mrs. Will Everhart. 

THOMASVILLE— 

Deacon Archibald Johnson, 
Mr. J. W. Black, 
Mr. Lindsay Bean, 
Mrs. Etta Cecil, 
Mr. H. J. Hill, 

Mrs. Mattie C. Westmorelan. 
WALLBURG— 

Mrs. Carrie Simpson, 
Mrs. Lou McCuiston. 

WALTERS GROVE— 
Mrs. Louise Prevost. 



J. A. McMillan, 

REV. CLYDE EDDINGER, 
MISS ROXIE SHEETS, 
J. N. BOWMAN, 
REV. W. VANN CARROLL, 

Committee on Obituaries. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 
NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish the gospel (as 
we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the association, and to co-operate 
with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the association, 
pastors of the churches in the association, and messengers from the churches. 
Each church shall be entitled to three messengers and one additional messenger 
for every 50 members or fraction thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4 The officers of this association shall be a moderator, vice-modera- 
tor, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected each year by the associa- 
tion at its annual meeting and shall hold office until their successors are elected. 
The duties of the officers shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in 
like organizations, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect and Executive Committee each year 
whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached in all parts of the 
association, and to attend to all business in the association between the session 
and to make such reports as they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the 
association. The association may appoint or elect such other boards or commit- 
tees from time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually, on Tuesday after the first 
Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request of the Executive Com- 
mittee change the time or the place of meeting of this association when it may 
be deemed by him not expedient to meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive Committee may 
fill any vacancy occurrying between meetings of the association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular session of the 
association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of Order for 
Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 

Churches that fail to contribute to benevolences inasmuch as the Liberty 
Association has as its chief function the propagation of a missionary spirit 
among our people, and inasmuch as a church which fails to contribute to bene- 
ficences outside its local budget fails to justify its claim of being a missionary 
Baptist church, we therefore recommend that a church which contributes nothing 
to missionary objects beyond its borders have the fellowship of the association 
removed from it, if after a year from its report to the association it shows no im- 
provement in its gifts. 

See page 12, 1928 Minutes. 

DATE OF CLOSING ASSOCIATIONAL YEAR CHANGED 

In order that the committee on the Digest of Church Letters might have 
their report ready for the first day of the Association in the future, Rev. Walter 
Warfford, of Lexington, makes motion that our Association year close with the 
last Sunday in August each year, and that immediately after this date the dif- 
ferent church clerks prepare their letters and mail them to the Clerk of the As- 
sociation . 

See page 29, 1931 Minutes. 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



ADVISORY BOARD OR COMMITTEE 
I. We recommend that this Executive Committee be abolished. 
That a board, to be known as the Advisory Board, be appointed by the As- 
sociation. 

I. That this board be composed of one member elected by each church in 
the Association, with the Moderator, Clerk and all pastors ex officio members. 

2. That there shall be a chairman of the board appointed from the member- 
ship thereof by the Association. 

3. That there shall be a Secretary to the board appointed from the mem- 
bership thereof by the Association. 

4. That the chairman and secretary be elected from the board and by the 
board after this year. 

5. That this board shall have the right and power to fill by appointment 
any vacancy or vacancies which may occure upon the recommendation from the 
church from which such vacancy or vacancies may occur. 

6. That this board shall be at all times subject to the Acts of the Associa- 
tion. 

See 1933 Minutes. 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year 


WHERE HELD 


PREACHER 


MODERATOR 


CLERK 


1832 


= 7 

IJamestown 


V' Tir T-> 5 ' — 

deo. W. Pureioy 


TtT TT 1 

Wm. Burch 


— • 

Peter Owen 


1833 


Holloways 


Josiah Wiseman 


Eli Carroll 


Peter Owen 


1834 


Abbotts Creek 


Eli Carroll 


Lli Carroll 


Peter Owen 


1835 


Liberty 


John Culpepper 


Eli Carroll 


Peter Owen 


1836 


Jersey 


Eli Carroll 


Eli Carroll 


Peter Owen 


1837 


Lick Creek 


Peter Owen 


Eli Carroll 


Peter Owen 


1838 


Abbotts Creek 


Benjamin Lanier 


Eli Carroll 


Peter Owen 


1839 


2Pine Meeting H 


Eli Carroll 


Eli Carroll 


Peter Owen 


1840 


Holloways 


Josiah Wiseman 


Eli Carroll 


Peter Owen 


1841 


New Friendship 


Benjamin Lanier 


Gershom Tussey 


Peter Owen 


1842 


Reeds X Roads 


Barton Roby 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1843 


Lick Creek 


Benjamin Lanier 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1844 


Abbotts Creek 


Wm. Turner 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1845 


Jersey 


Alfred Kinney 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1846 


Lick Creek 


Wm. Turner 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1847 


Abbotts Creek 


Wm. Turner 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1848 


Reeds X Roads 


Benjamin Lanier 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1849 


3Big: Creek 


Azariah Williams 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1850 


IJamestown 


Benjamin Lanier 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1851 


T,iberty 


Wm.. Turner 


Wm. Turner 


Azariah Williams 


1852 


Holloways 


Z. Minor 


Wm. Turner 


Azariah Williams 


1853 


Abbotts Creek 


Benjamin Lanier 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1854 


Reeds X Roads 


Alfred Kinney 


Joseph Spurgeon 


Azariah Williams 


1855 


Lick Creek 


Benjamin Lanier 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1856 


Abbotts Creek 


Unknown 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1857 


Reeds X Roads 


Wm. Lambeth 


Amos Weaver 


Azariah Williams 


1858 


Holloways 


Amos Weaver 


Amos Weaver 


Azariah Williams 


1859 


New Friendship 


Benjamin Lanier 


Benjamin Lanier 


J. H. Owen 


1860 


Abbotts Creek 


Wm. Turner 


Bem'amin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1861 


Jersey 


J. B. Jackson 


J. B. Jackson 


Azariah Williams 


1862 


Lick Creek 


F. H. Jones 


J. B. Jackson 


Azariah Williams 


1863 


Abbotts Creek 


T. W. Tobey 


J. B. Jackson 


Azariah Williams 


1864 


Thomasville 


W. H. Hammer 


Benjamin Lanier 


Azariah Williams 


1865 


No Session Held 


On account of 


Conditions caused 


By Civil War 


1866 


Lick Creek 


W. T. Waters 


Benjamin Lanier 


J. H. Owen 


1867 


Abbotts Creek 


Benjamin Lanier 


Benjamin Lanier 


J. H. Owen 


1868 


Jersey 


W. H. Hammer 


Benjamin Lanier 


J. H. Owen 


1869 


Abbotts Creek 


A. P. Stokes 


Wm. Turner 


J. H. Owen 


1870 


3Big Creek 


Wm. Turner 


Wm. Turner 


J. H. Owen 


1871 


2Pine Meeting H 


W, M. Wingate 


Wm. Turner 


J. H. Owen 


1872 


New Friendship 


H. Morton 


J. H. Brooks 


J. L. Pleasant 


1873 


Holloways 


Thomas Carrick 


H. Morton 


Thomas Carrick 


1874 


Lick Creek 


A. F. Redd 


Wm. Turner 


Thomas Carrick 


1875 


4Muddy Creek 


C. T. Bailey 


Wm. Turner 


Thomas Carrick 


1876 


Reeds X Roads 


H. W. Reinhart 


Wm. Turner 


Thomas Carrick 


1877 


High Point 


J. B. Richardson 


Wm. Turner 


Henry Sheets 


1878 


Big Creek 


I . W. Reinhart 


H. W. Reinhart 


Henry Sheets 


1879 


Liberty 


Harvey Hatcher 


H. W. Reinhart 


Henry Sheets 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year 


^^^E^ERE held 


PREACHER 


MODERATOR 


CLERK 


1880 


Holloways 


S. F. Conrad 


H. W. Reinha-rt 


Henry Sheets 


1881 


Jersey 


Henrv Sheets 


H. W. Reinhart 


Henry Sheets 


1882 


4]Muddy Creek 


S. H.' Thompson 


H. W. Reinhart 


Henry Sheets 


1883 


2Pine Meeting H 


O. F. Gregory 


H. W. Reinhart 


Henry Sheets 


1884 


Sv^mmerville 


S. H. Thompson 


"W'^m. Turner 


Henry Sheets 


1865 


Lexington 


J. B, Richardson 


"W^m. Turner 


Henry Sheets 


1886 


Abbotts Creek 


J. B. Richardson 


"Wm. Turner 


Henry Sheets 


1887 


Lick Creek 


Henrv Sheets 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1888 


Reeds X Roads 


C. Durham 


"Wm, Turner 


Henry Sheets 


1889 


New Friendship 


W. F. Watson 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1890 


Jersey 


J. M. Bennett 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1891 


2Pine Meeting H 


J. K. Fant 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1892 


High Point 


Henry Sheets 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1893 


Kernersville 


R. T. Bryan 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1894 


Holloways 


R. "Vandeventer 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1895 


Pleasant Grove 


J. H. Hilliard 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1896 


Denton 


Henrv Sheets 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1897 


SPiney Grove 


W. H. Rich 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1898 


Rich Fork 


J. H. Lambert 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1899 


Abbotts Creek 


S. B. Wilson 


James Smith 


Henrv Sheets 


1900 


Reeds X Roads 


W. H. Rich 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1901 


Lexing-ton 


C. A. G. Thomas 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1902 


Lick Creek 


Henrv Sheets 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1903 


Jersey 


W. A. Smith 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1904 


2Pine Meeting H 


Geo. P. Harrill 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1905 


New Friendship 


John R. Miller 


James Smith 


Henry Sheets 


1906 


Thomasville 


J. S. Farmer 


James Smith 


Henrv Sheets 


1907 


Wallburg 


Dr. R, T. Vann 


J. W. Nowell 


P. S. Vann 


1908 


Denton 


M, L, Ivesler 


J. W. Nowell 


P. S. Vann 


1909 


Liberty 


S. D. Swaim 


Henrv Sheets 


P. S. Vann 


1910 


Orphanage 


O. A. Keller 


Henrv Sheets 


P. S. Vann 


1911 


Abbotts Creek 


G. A. Martin 


Henrv Sheets 


P. S. Vann 


1912 


Stoner's Grove 


0*. A. Keller 


Henrv Sheets 


P. S. Vann 


1913 


Rich Fork 


M. L. Kesler 


Henrj^ Sheets 


P.S. Vann 


1914 


Holloways 


G. A, Martin 


G. A. Martin 


Henry Sheets 


1915 


Center Hill 


O. A. Keller 


o'. a". Keller 


Henry Sheets 


1916 


Wallbnrg 


I, M, Mercer 


0. A. Keller 


Henry Sheets 


1917 


Smith Grove 


Fred D. Hale 


R. S. Green 


Henry Sheets 


1918 


Lexington 


M. L. Kesler 


R. S. Green 


Archibald Johnson 


1919 


Denton 


R.' E." White 


R. S. Green 


Archibald Johnson 


1920 


New Friendship 


J. S. Hardaway 


R. S. Green 


Archibald Johnson 


1921 


Churchland 


M. L. Kesler 


R. S. Green 


Archibald Johnson 


1922 


Summerville 


W. A. I'ough 


R. S. Green 


Paul C. Newton 


1923 


Abbotts Creek 


W. L. Barrs 


Archibald Johnson 


Paul C. Newton 


1924 


Reeds 


C. H. T.rueblood 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1925 


Liberty 


C. A. Owens 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1926 


Rich Fork 


E. N. Gardner 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J . Smith 


1927 


Thomasville 


H. T. Penry 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1928 


Holloways 


M. L. Kesler 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1929 


Stoner's Grove 


J. M. Hayes 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1930 


Abbotts Creek 


M. L. Kesler 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1931 


Denton 


M. O. Alexander 


G. Wilson Miller 


Sajn J. Smith 


1932 


Lexing-ton 


G. A. Martin 


G. Wilson Miller 


Sam J. Smith 


1933 


Lick Creek 


E. F. Mumford 


G. Wilson Miller 


Sam J. Smith 


1934 


Jersey 


W. L. Warfford 


G. Wilson Miller 


Sam J. Smith 


1935 


Mills Home 


E. C. Roach 


R. D. Covineton 


Sam J. Smith 


1 Now High Point: 


2 Now Churchland ; 


3 Now Eldorado ; 




4 Now 


Clemmonsville ; 


5 Now Wallburg 





PROCEEDINGS OF THE W. M. U. OF THE 
LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 



The twenty-ninth annual meeting of the Woman's Missionary Union of the 
Liberty Association was held with the New Friendship Baptist Church April 24, 
1935. The meeting was called to order at 10 o'clock by the superintendent, Miss 
Sallie L. CcCracken. The opening hymn was, "Stand Up for Jesus". Mrs. R. S. 
Green, Associate Supt., conducted the devotional reading — I Cor. 3. Mrs, Green 
spoke of the foundation on which the W. M. U. was builded and mentioned those 
who have led in the past. Mrs. I. P. Frazier led in prayer. Visitors recognized 
at this time were Miss Mary Currin, State Young People's Leader, and Mrs. B. 
K. Mason, Superintendent of the Charlotte Division. Mrs. W. A. Shoaf, president 
of the hostess society, introduced Mrs. S. O. Hinkle who gave the Union a hearty 



26 



MINUTES OF THE 



welcome. Rec. E. C. Roach made response. Pastor, Rev. B. K. Mason, also gave 
friendly greeting. 

In answer to the roll call, delegates rose and were recognized. The presi- 
dent of each of the societies spoke briefly of the outstanding things that were ac- 
complished in her society during the year. Special recognition was made at this 
time of the A-1 Union — New Friendship. 

Report of officers: 

PERSONAL SERVICE 

Number of societies doing Personal Service — W. M. S., 13; Y. W. A., 6; 
G. A., 5; R. A., 5; Sunbeams, 4. Kinds of service being done are: Visits, cards, 
trays and flowers to sick and shutins; services held in hospitals, homes and jails; 
gifts to needy persons, objects and institutions; help in organizations among the 
Negro churches. Furnishing periodicals to Negro organizations, cash and other 
gifts to Mr. and Mrs. Negrin, Missionaries to Cuba, and a student sent to 
Ridgecrest. This line of work is going forward in a very great way and we feel 
that much good is being accomplished. 

Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Personal Service Chairman. 

MISSION STUDY 

No. Classes held— W. M. S., 13; Y. W. A., 10; G. A., 9; R. A., 6; S. B., 5. 

No. Members enrolled in Societies— W. M. S., 162; Y. W. A., 99; G. A., 121; 
R. A., 99; S. B., 127. 

No Members enrolled in Classes— W. M. S., 134; Y. W. A., 80; G. A., 166; 
R. A., 101; S. B., 102. 

No. Record Cards— No. 1, 34; No. 2, 3. 

No. Seals— Silver, 110; Gold, 8; Official, 7. 

No. Honor Certificates, 3 ; Home and Foreign, 4 ; Seals, Red, 1 ; Blue, 2. 
No. Reading Cards— Y. W. A., 10; Stamps— W. M. S., 20. 
No. Certificates— Y. W. A., 14; G. A., 58; R. A., 31; S. B., 25. 
No. Seals— Y. W. A., 54; G. A., Green, 83, Red, 13; R. A., Blue, 24, Red, 4; 



S. B., Gold, 47, Black, 5. 

No. Books studied in classes, 21. 

No. Letters written by chairman, 20. 

Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Mission Study Chairman. 

TREASURER 

In Treasury January 1, 1934 $14.46 

Contributed by Societies During Year 19.95 

TOTAL $34.01 $34.01 

DISBURSEMENTS 

To Mrs. P. S. Vann for Charlotte Division Expense $ 3.00 

To Mrs. W. J. Griffin for Postage 2.00 

To Miss Sallie L. McCracken for Postage and Expense 15.00 

Tax on Checks 06 

TOTAL $20.06 $20.06 

Balance in Treasury $13.95 



MRS. MASKEY M. SMITH, Treasurer. 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 
It is my happy privilege to report that we have had a good year. Our quoto 
of $4,912.08 was raised and a little over, the total for the year amounting to 
$5,060.16. For the first time we report an A-1 full graded union — New Friend- 
ship. Thinking you might be interested and since you have no other way of learn- 
ing how our contributions, when put together, really made something worthwhile, 
I want to take a little time to tell you how our various offerings rounded out 
for the year: 



Cooperative Program $3,168.73 

Home Missions 242.96 

Lottie Moon Christmas Offering 305.89 

Hundred Thousand Club 187.00 

Orphanage 606.73 

State Mission 129.99 

Heck Memorial 125.67 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



Hospital 80.01 

Margaret Fund 48.85 

Training School 30.35 

Our record for the year is as follows : Number of organizations, 65 ; Num- 
ber of new societies, 8; Letters and cards written, 139; Miles traveled, 3200; 
Churches in the association with no W. M. U. organization, 11. 

I trust we may return to our homes heartened and encouraged and inspired 
to labor more diligently and more joyfully for the advancement of our Master's 
Kingdom than we have ever done before. 

MISS SALLIE Mccracken, Superintendent. 

Mrs. B. K. Mason showed by use of a map the territory of the Charlotte 
Division and spoke interestingly of its work. Miss Florence Motsinger recom- 
mended the periodicals in a very appealing way. This was confirmed by Mr. 
Mason who represented the Biblical Recorder. Mention was made also of Charity 
and Children and the Editor, Mr. J. A. McMillan, was recognized. Mr. Smith 
Hagaman, Superintendent of the Baptist Hospital, Winston-Salem, gave a very 
practical talk on the work of the Hospital. His subpect was "Walking With 
Christ in the World. Miss Mary Currin gave an address on the work she is 
just beginning. Her subject was, **Lift Ye His Banner for Young People". Miss 
Currin shows much interest in her work and we feel sure that the young people 
are going forward with her leadership. 

After appointment of committees meeting was adjourned for dinner. 

Beginning the afternoon session, Rev. L. J. Matthews brought a spiritual 
message using Mark 6:31. The audience was favored at this time with musical 
selections given by Mr. Carey Davis and Miss Hazel Kiger. New Friendship Y. 
W. A. gave a pageant — The Better Way — which was entertaining and at the 
same time carried with it a helpful message. Miss Roxie Sheets spoke of the 
success of the Hundred Thousand Club. The Missionary message of the day 
was brought by Mrs. J. B. Hipps, Shanghai University, China. She spoke of the 
great influence which American life has upon the people of China and in closing, 
left with us a challenge — that of making a warless world. 

Report of committees: 

The committee on Time and Place which was composed of Mrs. W. C. Wrenn, 
Mrs. Ira Snyder, and Mrs. E. C. Roach, recommended that the next meeting be 
held with the Lexington Church on the last Wednesday in April. 

Mrs. T. H. Tomlinson reported deaths as follows: Miss Mary Cook, Mills 
Home; Mrs. L. A. Martin, First Church, Lexington; Mrs, J. J. McCuiston, Wall- 
burg; Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, First Church, Thomasville; Mrs. G. R. Loftin, Stog- 
ners Grove. In memory of these dear ones who have gone before the congregation 
stood and sang, "Face to Face". 

Conmiittee composed of Mrs. G. S. Hartzofi, Mrs. W. A. Shoaf, Mrs. A. Z. 
Boles, Brs. B. F. Duncum, Mrs. C. B. Stroud made the following nominations: 

Superintendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Supt., Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 

Sec. and Treas., Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, Route 6, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Junior Supt., Miss Ola Lowder, Route 5, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Personal Service Chm., Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Route 6, Lexington, N. C. 

Mission Study Chm., Mrs. W. J .Griffin, Route 4, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Mrs. Hartzog took the vote and the election was unanimous. 

We wish to express our appreciation to the New Friendship Church for 
their hospitality as expressed in the gracious welcome, the lovely flowers and 
bountiful dinner; to our faithful superintendent and the excellent program she 
had for today; to our visiting speakers, Mr. Hagaman, Miss Currin, and Mrs. 
Hipps; and to those who provided us with the music. May the influence of the 
meeting remain with us thru the coming year. 

Courtesy Committee — Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Mrs. R. J. Hedrick, Mrs. Ed 
McAbal. 

Rev. J. A. Neilson gave the closing devotional using for his Scripture I Sam- 
uel 13:1-10, and his subject, "Listening to God's Call". The meeting was closed 
with prayer led by Mr. Neilson. 

Truly this was a program filled with good things. 

MRS. MASKEL M. SMITH, Secretary. 



28 



MINUTES OF THE 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 
Pastors 

Name Address Church Member of 

Andrews, E. N. C, Thomasville, N. C Rick Fork 

Barringer, C. D., Salisbury, N. C, Route 2 Smith Grove 

Bradley, Earl L., Spencer, N. C , Churchland 

Bowman, J. N., Erlanger, N. C Tabernacle 

Carroll, W. Vann., Denton, N. C Denton 

Darnell, W. C, Lexington, N. C, Gen. Del Summerville 

Eddinger, Clyde, Welcome, N. C Welcome 

Gaines, L. S., Lexington, N. C Lexington 

Hopkins, W. H., China Grove, N. C Walters Grove 

Hunt, Howard, Denton, N. C Pleasant Plains 

Mason, R. K., Winston-Salem, N. C, Box 2030 New Friendship 

Matthews, L. J., Wallburg, N. C Wallhurg 

Mumford, E. F., High Point, N. C, Route 1 Abbotts Creek 

McGee, W. K., Thomasville, N. C Thomasvifle 

Neilson, J. A., Thomasville, N. C Mills Home 

Penry, H. T., Sonthmont, N. C Stoners Grove 

Pickler, J. M., Albemarle, N. C Taylors Grove 

Roach, E. C, Lexington, N. C, Route 3 Sheets Memorial 

Wilson, S. B., High Point, N. C Lick Creek 

ORDAINED MINISTERS, HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE ASSOCIATION 
WHO ARE NOT MEMBERS 

Name Church Member of Address 

Caldwell, R, N. (Unactive), Taylors Grove New London, N. C, Route 2 

Cross, Gilmer (Student), Lexington Lexington, N. C. 

Erwin, Samuel J. (Unactive), Rich Fork Thomasville, N. C, Route 1 

Gallimore, A. R.- (Missionary), Lexington .Canton, China 

King, J. M. (Unactive), New Friendship Winston-Salem, N. C, Route 5 

Newton, J. D. (Unactive), Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

ASSISTANT PASTORS AND EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 

None 

B. Y. P. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 
Officers for the Year Have Not Been Elected. 
B. Y. P. U. PRESIDENTS, LEADERS AND DIRECTORS 
CAROLINA AVENUE— Director, George Poole, Thomasville, N. C; Pres. 
Sr. U., Miss Helen Holt, Thomasville, N. C; Leader Int. Union, Jennings Smith, 
Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCHLAND— Director, C. R. Darr, Lexington, N. C, Route 5; Pres. 
Adult U., W. Hence Beck, Lexington, N. C, Route 5; Pres. S. U., Alvery Kesler, 
Lexington, N. C, route 5; Leader Int. U., Mrs. C. R. Darr, Lexington, N. C, 
Route 5; Leader Jr. U., Mrs. John Brewer, Linwood, N. C, Route 1. 

DENTON— Director, Mrs. R. A. Allen, Denton, N. C. 

JERSEY— Pres. Sr. U., Chas. Penninger, Lexington, N. C, Route 6. 

LEXINGTON— Director, Miss Ruth Hutches, Lexington, N. C; Pres. Adult 
U., Mrs. Mary Yarborough, Lexington, N. C; Pres. Sr. U., Miss Grace William.s, 
Lexington, N. C. ; Leader Int. U., Fred Golightly and L. W. Weller, and Miss Hat- 
tie Burgess, Lexington, N. C; Leader Jr. U., Miss Ann Boykin. 

LIBERTY— Director, B. J. May, Cid, N. C, Route 1; Pres. Adult U., L. V. 
Miller, Thomasville, N. C, Route 2; Pres. S. Union, Miss Pauline Watword, 
Thomasville, N. C, Route 2; Leader Int. U., Mrs. 1. Z. Clodfelter, Thomasville, 
N. C, Route 2; Leader Jr, U., Mrs. L. V. Miller. 

_ MILLS HOME— Director, J. A. Neilson, Thomasville, N. C; suspended dur- 
ing infantile paralysis situation; officers have not been elected yet. 

RICH FORK— Director, Miss Zelma Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Route 1; 
Pres. Sr. U., Wilford Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, Route 1; Leader Int. U., 
Miss Mosell Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Route 1 ; Leader Jr. U., Mrs. Will Stout, 
Thomasville, N. C, Route 1. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



SHEETS MEMORIAL— Director, Johnnie Craven, Lexington, N .C, Route 
6; Pres. Adult U., Tolbert 1. Stroud, Lexington, N. C; Pres. Sr. U., Otis Bean, 
Lexington, N. C, Route 5; Leader Int. U., Nora Gallimore, Lexington, N. C, 
Route 5; Leader Jr. U., Mattie Bean and Mrs. Johnnie Craven, Lexington, N. C. 

STONERS GROVE— Director, Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, Southmont, N. C; Pres. 
Adult U., Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. C, Route 6; Pres. Sr. U., Mrs. 
Raymond Monses, Southmont, N. C; Leader Int. U., Morris Wrenn, Southmont, 
N. C. ; Leader Jr. U., Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, Southmont, N. C. 

TABERNACLE— Director, T. B. Marlin, Erlanger, N. C; Pres. Adult Un- 
ion, H. L. Banks, Erlanger, N. C; Pres. Sr. IJ., Mina Lawson, Erlanger, N. C. ; 
Leader Int. U., Hazel Bowman, Erlanger, N. C; Leader Jr. U., Violet Edwards, 
Erlanger, N. C. 

THOMASVILLE— Director, G. G. Pridgen, Thomasville, N. C; Pres. Adult 
Union, W. E. Oglesley, Thomasville, N. C; Pres. Sr. U., Miss Ruby Connell, 
Thomasville, N. C; Leader Int. U., Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C; Lead- 
er Jr. U., Mrs. S. R. Matthews and Miss Blanch Gnatt, Thomasville, N. C. 

WELCOME— Pres. Sr. U., Miss Ruth Hinkle, Welcome, N. C. 

WALLBURG— Director, Rev. L. J. Matthews, Wallburg, N. C; Pres. Sr. 
U., Mrs. Raymond Wilson, Wallburg, N. C; Leader Int. U., Louise McGee, Wall- 
burg, N. C; Leader Jr. U., Alverta Reese, Wallburg, N. C. 

W. M. U. ASSOOIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Supt. — Miss Sallie McCracken Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Supt. — Mrs. R. S. Green Thomasville, N. C. 

Sec.-Treas.— Mrs. M. M. Smith Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 6 

Mission Study Chrm. — Mrs. W. J. Griffin..Winston-Salem, Rt. 4 

Personal Ser. Chrm. — Mrs. A.F. Warfford Lexington, Rt. 6 

Junior Supt. — Miss Ola Lowder Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

LOCAL PRESIDENTS 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. B. F. Duncum, Lexington, N. C, Route 5. 

HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. W. H. Johnson, Lexington, N. C, Route 6. 

JERSEY— Mrs. R. V. Palmer, Linwood, N. C. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. V. R| Parker, Lexington, N. C. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. L. V. Miller, Thomasville, N. C, Route 2. 

MILLS HOME— Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. W. A. Shoaf, Winston-Salem, N. C, Route 5. 

REEDS— Mrs. Alda Graver, Lexington, N. C, Route 3. 

RICH FORK— Mrs. W. M. Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, Route 1. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. Z. V. Fullbright, Lexington, N. C. 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, Southmont, N. C. 

TABERNACLE— Mrs. R. F. Stafford, Erlinger, N. C. 

THOMASVILLE— Mrs. L. E. Teague, Thomasville, N. C. 

WELCOME— Mrs. B. R. Zimmerman, Welcome, N. C. 

WALLBURG— Miss Etta Teague, Wallburg, N. C. 

Y. W. A. COUNSELORS 
CHURCHLAND— Mrs. John Brewer, Linwood, N. C, Route 1. 
HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. L. C. Cross, Lexington, N. C, Route 6. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. C. C. Wall, Lexington, N. C. 
MILL HOME— Miss Helen Rowell, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C, Route 4. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. C, Route 6. 
TABERNACLE— Mrs. Paul Solomon, Erlanger, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG— Mrs. C. V. Teague, Wallburg, N. C. 



30 



MINUTES OF THE 



G. A. LEADERS 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. H. 0. Walser, Linwood, N. C, Route 1. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. D. S. Bennett, Lexington, N. C, and Mrs. Bob Green, 
Lexington, N. C. 

MILLS HOME — Miss Margaret Joyner, Miss Beatrice Council, Miss Sallie 
McCracken, Mrs. R. D. Covington, and Mrs. E. Lee Fox, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Miss Jeanett Kiger, Winston-Salem, N. C, Route 5. 
RICH FORK— Miss Zelma Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Route 1. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. C, Route 6. 
TABERNACLE— Mrs. Violet Cline, Erlanger, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. Blanche Gnatt, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG— Stella Cook, Wallburg, N. C. 

R. A. LEADERS 

CHURCHLAND— G. A. Barnes, Linwood, N. C, Route 1. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. F. H. Wall, Lexington, N. C. 

MILLS HOME— Mrs. I. P. Frazier, J. A. Neilson, Miss Allie Kelley, Thom- 
asville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Miss Lois Nifong, Winston-Salem, N. C, Route 4. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, Southmont, N. C. 
TABERNACLE— Mrs. E. C. Putnam, Erlanger, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. S. R. Matthews, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG— Evangeline Pardue, Wallburg, N. C. 

SUNBEAM LEADERS 
CHURCHLAND— Margaret Shoaf, Linwood, N. C, Route 1. 
HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. G. C. Palmer, Lexington, N. C, Route 6. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. L. W. Weller, Lexington, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. C. F. Motsinger, Winston-Salem, N. C, Route 5. 
RICH FORK— Miss Merdith Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Route 1. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. Tom Cooper, Lexington, N. C, Route 6. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. Raymond Monsees, Southmont, N. C. 
TABERNACLE— Mrs. Artie Lindsay, Erlanger, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 
WELCOME— Mrs. B. R. Zimmerman, Welcome, N. C. 
WALLBURG— Mrs. William King, Wallburg, N. C. 



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LIB€RTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Che hUhDR6DTH AMD FCUPTh AMMUAL 

. . . Held Witk . . . 

R€€DS BAPTIST CHURCH 

R. F. D. No. 3, Lexington, N. C 

/eptemUp 8tli and 9tK, 1936 



Th€ next Session will be held Tuesday and Wednes- 
day after ffie First Sunday in September, 1937, 
wi4)i flie Church land Church, Lin wood, 



NORTH CAROLINA 




N. C, R. F. D. No. I 



INDEX 



Appointment of Committees 9 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 28 

Auxiliaries — Associational 4-28 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 4 

Church Clerks 33 

Church Treasurers 34 

Committees: Promotion Executive 20-4 

Finance 9 

On Nominations 9 

Program for 1937 20 

To Report 1937 Chairman 4 

On Digest of Church Letters— 1937 20 

On Time, Place and Preacher 20 

Standing 4 

Constitution and By-Laws 22 

Deceased Members 21 

Directories: Associational 27-4 

Election of Officers 13 

Church 31-32-33-34-35 

B. Y. P. U 28 

Ordained Ministers 27 

R. A. and G. A 30 

Sunbeams 30 

W. M. U 29 

Historical Table 23 

Messengers , 4 

Order of Business 6 

Orphanage Representative 20 

Pastors of Association 27 

Pastors, New 5 

Proceedings, Associational 6 

Proceedings of W. M. U. Annual Meeting 24 

Reports: Religious Literature 7 

Committee on Obituaries 21-18 

B. T. U 19 

Committee on Nominations 13-20 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 20 

Digest of Church Letters 10 

Education , , 12 

Foreign Missions 17 

Hospitals 11 

Home Missions 16 

Mills Home 7 

Ministerial Relief 11 

Public Morals 18 

State Missions 15 

Sunday Schools 19 

Treasurer's 13 

W. M. U. Work 14 

Standing Resolutions 22 

Statistical Tables 31-32-33-34-35-36 

Serman, Annual 10 

Spring Session 20 

Sunday School Superintendents 32 

Visitors 9 

Vote of Thanks 20 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries and Officers 29 

W. M. U. Associational Annual Meeting 24 




REV. E. C. ROACH 

Pastor of Reeds Baptist Church 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



DIRECTORY 

OFFICERS 

R. D. Covington, Moderator Thomasville, N. C. 

G. W. Miller, Vice Moderator Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk and Treasurer Lexington, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL EXECUTIVE PROMOTING COMMITTEE 

Rev. Walter L. Warfford, Chairman Lexington, N. C. 

CHAIRM:AN of committees to report at 1937 SESSION 



Baptist Hospitals 

B. T. U 

Christian Education 

Foreign Missions 

Home Missions 

Ministerial Relief 

Mills Home 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement 

Religious Literature 

State of Churches 

State Missions 

Sunday Schools 

W. M. U 



C. C. Wrenn, Southmont, N. C. 

G. G. Pridgen, Thomasville, N. C. 

Rev. J. A. McMillan, Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. D. F. Conrad, Lexington, N. C. 

Rev. L. J. Matthews, Wallburg, N. C. 

L. E. Teague, Thomasville, N. C. 

G. W. Miller, Lexington, N, C. 

Rev. E. L. Bradley, Spencer, N. C. 

...Mrs. Alda Craver, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

Rev. W. L. Warfford, Lexington, N. C. 

....D. S. Hayworth, High Point, N. C, Rt. 2 

B. J. May, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2 

.Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
B. T. U. 

Annual Meeting was held with Rich Fork church, August 30, 1936. 

Associational Director G. G. Pridgen, Thomasville, N. C. 

For other officers see Church Directories, pages 27-28. 

W. M. U. 

Annual Meeting was held with the Lexington church on April 29, 1936. 

Associational Supt Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 

For other officers see church directories, page 29. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 

Association wide meetings were held v^^ith different churches six times during 
the year. 

Associational Supt C. F. Motsinger, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

For other officers see church directories on page 30. 

BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE BOUNDS OF THE 
LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. Established in 1885. General Manager 
Hon. I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C. Treasurer, R. D. Covington, Thomasville, 
N. C. Chairman Board of Trustees, B. W. Spillman, Kinston, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY, STANDING COMMITTEES, REPRESENTA- 
TIVES, AUXILIARY MEETINGS, ETC. 

Associational Missionary other paid employees— None. 
Associational Laymen's Movement — None. 

Associational meetings of the W. M. U., B. T. U. and Sunday Schools are not 
held at the same time or during the sessions of the Annual Association. 

LIST OF MESSENGERS FOR THE 1936 SESSIONS 
(As Listed on the Church Letters) 

ABBOTTS CREEK— John Welborn, Willie Spurgeon, Chas. Bodenheimer, T. 
Carrick Teague, Sanford Hayworth, Jr., Miss Minnie Hayworth, D. S. Hayworth 
and Miss Mattie Teague. 



5 



MINUTES OF THE 



CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. A. L. Gordon, Mrs. H. D. Bradshaw and Mrs. A. J. 
Lowe. 

CENTER HILL— W. J. Beck, J. W. Jarrett, Mrs. A. L. Miller, Mrs. Ray Owen, 
D. L. Tysinger, G. R. Bean, D. B. Hunt, Bertie Mae Jarrett and Ruth Miller. 

CHURCHLAND— W. Henry Lomax, Mrs. Henry Lomax, W. Hence Beck, L. E. 
Rickard, S. A. Allred, B. F. Duncum and wife, Mrs. J. C. Sowers, Mrs. John Brewer 
and R. K. Williams. 

DENTON— Mr. and Mrs. V. K, Skeen, Mrs. R. A. Allen, Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Mrs. 
R. C. Wall, Mr. and Mrs. John L. Snider, W. R. Snider, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Sni- 
der, Mrs. W. H. Rush and Mrs. Ben Carroll. 

JERSEY— R. A. Tate— J. A. Pope, Miss Sadie Sharp, Mrs. R. A. Tate, Mrs. W. 
L. Smith and Mrs. J. A. Pope. 

Lexington — Mrs. P. A. Myers, Mrs. E. Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. Sam J. Smith, C. 
M. Wall, P. V. Critcher, J. D. Redwine, G. W. Miller, R. Grady Shoaf, Mrs. D. F. 
Conrad, Mrs. C. R. Sharpe, Mrs. G. W. Miller, H. C. Myers and Mrs Louis S. Gaines. 

LIBERTY— F. E. Cowman, Mrs. B. J. May, L. V. Miller, Mrs. L. E. Hepler, Mrs. 
L. V. Miller, Mrs. C. Sam Pierce and B. J. May. 

HOLLOWAYS— Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Cross, Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Beanblossom, 
Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Greer. 

LICK CREEK— Mrs. A. W. Feezor, Mrs. J. A. Kinney, Mrs. M. W. Davis, A. M. 
Cole, W. R. Cross, A. L. Bean. 

MILLS HOME— Mr. I. G. Greer, Mr. J. A. McMillan, R. D. Covington, Mrs. 
I. ,P. Frazier, Miss Jennie Ballard, Mrs. Lee Fox, Elma Harwood, Ruby Byerly, 
C. C. McKoin and Romulus Skaggs. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Farris Swaim, E. L. Snider, Robert Hartman, Mrs. S. O. 
Hinkle, Thomas Lambeth and Mrs. A. J. Hartman. 

OAK GROVE — Arlis Roach, Inez Davis and Mrs. Bessie Owen. 

PLEASANT PLAINS— Wilson Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. Fayette Loflin, Mr, and 
Mrs. George Hill, Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Williams and Elwood Hill. 

REEDS — ^Arlie Myers, Leo Hobbs Ralph Craver, James Leonard, Grady Mor- 
phis and Webster Hege. 

RICH FORK— T. H. Small, Zelma Clinard, Wilford Eddinger, Mrs. W. M. 
Eddinger, Tom Everhart and E. N. C. Andrews. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL — Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Gallimore. 

SMITH GROVE — Mr. Joe Brewer, Mrs. Rosa Lanning, Mrs. Mary Clemment, 
Mrs. Lucille Barringer and Miss Hazel Orrell. 
SOUTHSIDE— C. L. Matthews. 

STONERS GROVE— Mis. Joe Long, O. L. Stoner, A. A. Graves, Mrs. John 
Penry, Mrs. A. F. Warfford and Miss Saminie Lee Wolf. 

SUMMERVILLE — Mrs. Emma Carrick, Mrs. Lucy Tysinger and G. E. Tysinger. 

TABERNACLE (Erlanger)— Mrs. T. B. Marlin, Mrs. B. L. Hames, Mrs. J. N. 
Bowman, Mrs. Nannie Mauney and Mrs. F. W. Hughes. 

TAYLORS GROVE— Mrs. J. M. Coggins, Mrs. Flatie Russell, Add Cranford, 
Miss Mabel Cranford, Miss Ellen Hurley and John Epps. 

WALLBURG— Miss Eva Clinard, J. W. Yokely, Wm. King, Mr. and Mrs. Masky 
Smith, Mrs. Florence Fowler, W. P. Green and C. R. Dodson. 

WALTERS GROVE— Mr. and Mrs. Earlie Klass, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Gallimore, 
Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Yates, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Pierce, Mrs. Johnnie Pierce, Mrs. Gur- 
ney Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Clark, Curtis Cody and Mr. and Mrs. Burt Hunt. 

THOMASVILLE— W. L. Collett, Earl Ogiesby, Chas. Powell, Miss Stella Wag- 
ner, Mrs. R. S. Green, L. E. Teague, Mrs. L. W. Hansell, Mrs. Paul Mailey, Mrs. 
L. B. Dameron, Mr. and Mrs. Prevette Westmoreland, Mrs. J. W. Spoolman, Mrs. 
T. B. Brufcon, Mrs. M. L. Howard, W. E. Ogiesby, Rev. and Mrs. J. D. Newton, Mrs. 
Lila W. Howard, Mrs. Tom Kmdley, Miss Juanita Spoolman and Manley Howard. 

WELCOME-^M. L. Craver, W. H. Snider, E. E. Risner, W. S. Disher, J. F. 
Crotts and Mrs. W. H. Snider. 

NEW PASTORS IN THE ASSOCIATION 

Rev. J. A. Cox, Central Falls, N. C, pastor at Carolina Avenue. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



6 



PROCEEDINGS 

of the 

ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Held with the 
REEDS CHURCH 

Lexington, N. C, R. F. D. No. 3 



FIRST DAY 
Tuesday, September 8, 1936 

1. The One Hundredth and Fourth Annual Session of the Liberty Baptist As- 
sociation convened with the Reeds Baptist Church, Lexington, N. C, R. F. D. No. 
3, Tuesday, September 8, 1936, at 9:45 A. M. 

2. The devotional for the opening session was led by Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor 
of the Reeds church. 

3. The Association was called to order for the transaction of business by the 
Moderator, R. D, Covington. 

4. Sam J. Smith read the report of the Program Committee, which was 
adopted. 

PROGRAM 

For the One Hundred and Fourth Session 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Reeds Church, Rt. 3, Lexington, N. C, Tuesday- Wednesday, Sept. 8 and 9, 1936 

FIRST DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. E. C. Roach, Pastor 

10:00 Report of Program Committee 

10:10 Religious Literature Rev. J. A. McMillan 

10:30 Orphanage Rev. W. K. McGee 

11:15 Recognition of Visitors, Appointment of Committees 

11:30 Sermon Rev. L. S. Gaines 

12:15 Lunch 

1:30 Praise and Worship Rev. H. T. Penry 

1:45 State of Churches Rev. E. N. C. Andrews 

1. One Minute Report from Each Church 

2. Digest of Church Letters (Blackboard) 

3. Associational Goals for 1936 (Blackboard) 
3:00 Cooperative Program 

1. Ministerial Relief Dr. C. R. Sharpe 

2. Baptist Hospital Rev. J. A. Neilson 

3. Christian Education Miss Elizabeth Smith 

SECOND DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. W. L. Warfford 

10:00 Election of Officers, Miscellaneous Business 

10:15 Women's Missionary Union Mrs. L. S. Gaines 

10:45 Cooperative Program 

1. State Missions Mr. Henry Lomax 

2. Home Missions Rev. J. D. Newton 

3. Foreign Missions Rev. Vann Carroll 

11:15 Address 

12:15 Lunch 

1:30 Praise and Worship Rev. W. C. Darnell 

1:45 Temperance and Public Morals Rev. L. W. Matthews 

2:15 Sunday Schools Mr. Conrad Motsinger 



7 



MINUTES OF THE 



2:45 Baptist Training Union Prof. Romulus Skaggs 

3:15 Reports of Committees 
Adjourn 

R. D. COVINGTON, Moderator 
SAM J. SMITH, Clerk 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

5. The report on Religious Literature was brought by Rev. J. A. McMillan, 
Editor of Charity and Children, at Thomasville, N. C. Upon motion to adopt, the 
report Was discussed by Rev. J. A. McMillan, R. F, Tenell, Raleigh, N. C, repre- 
sentative of the Biblical Recorder, and is adopted. 

The Baptists of North Carolina have the most complete line of religious litera- 
ture that could be desired. The great religious book is the Bible. This best seller 
is available in a great variety of prices and bindings. To help in the study of the 
Bible, the Sunday School Board of The Southern Baptist Convention publish Sun- 
day School and B. T. U. quarterlies and additional magazines and periodicals for 
the superintendents and leaders. A vast amount of this priceless material leaves 
Nashville, Tenn., in a constant stream. In addition to the Sunday School and 
B. T. U. literature the Board publishes Home and Foreign Fields. This is one of 
the very best magazines on missions published and a large number of Baptists 
would not think of doing without it in their homes. The Board also publishes 
books but North Carolina Baptists should buy all of their books through the Bap- 
tist Book Store in Raleigh. It is owned jointly by the Sunday School Board and 
the Baptist State Convention. The profits are divided half and half. The Con- 
vention half goes into the Convention Treasury. Send for a catalogue and get a 
supply of good books for your winter reading. When you have read yours, ex- 
change with your neighbor. 

The W. M. U. of the Southern Baptist Convention publishes a number of 
magazines for the different departments of their work: Royal Service for the 
W. M. S.; The Window for Y. W. A.; World Comrades for the G. A., R. A. and 
Sunbeams. These are published in Birmingham, Ala. The W. M. U. also pub- 
lishes valuable tracts as do also the Foreign Mission Board and the Home Mission 
Board. Tracts can also be secured from Baptist headquarters in Raleigh. Write 
for them. Of course. North Carolina Baptists have The Biblical Recorder and 
Charity and Children. The Biblical Recorder is about 100 years old and Charity 
and Children about fifty. There are Baptists in large numbers who would not 
be without either. Thus it is that North Carolina Baptists have access to all that 
could be desired in the way of religious literature. Be sure that the members of 
your church, W. M. U., Sunday School and B. T. U. are amply supplied. 

JOHN ARCH MCMILLAN 

THE MILLS HOME 

6. The report on Mills Home was brought by Rev. W. K. McGee, pastor of 
the Thomasville church. Upon motion to adopt, the report is discussed by Rev. 
McGee, Mrs. I. P. Frazier and Miss Inez Patterson, of the orphanage. 

Three songs are rendered in a most touching manner by Miss Ruby Byerly, 
Miss Elma Howard, Miss Mary Bell Jarrell and Miss Delia Mae Watson, four girls 
from the orphanage. 

Further discussion was made by Rev. J. M. Hilliard, of High Point, R. K. Wil- 
liams, C. M. Wall. The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
TO LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

After fifty years of unbroken service to dependent children, the Baptist Or- 
phanage of North Carolina is more highly regarded by our Baptist people than 
ever before. This is evidenced by the increasing number of churches whose Sun- 
day schools take a monthly offering for the Orphanage. This financial policy is 
a wise one from the point of view of both the Orphanage and the churches. It 
will, with the Thanksgiving offering, supply the needs of the Orphanage in so far 
as it is faithfully observed by the churches; and there are few things that will do 
more to enrich the life of the churches and promote within them a warm spiritual 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



8 



fellowship than a consistent concern and care for orphan children. 

The past year has been a good one at the Orphanage. There are many un- 
met physical needs in the form of new buildings and improved equipment, and it 
is earnestly hoped that these needs will be speedily met by our Baptist individuals 
and churches. But considering the physical equipment, an excellent work has been 
done in caring for the children. 

The fine tone of the religious life in the Orphanage is very evident to anyone 
who comes into frequent contact with the homes. The past year has been a high 
one in this regard in both evangelistic and missionary response. A great number 
of boys and girls and young people have given their hearts to Christ. A fine in- 
fluence for growth in the Christian life is thrown about these young persons. The 
members of the churches at the two homes contributed last year the sum of $5,- 
291.19, $1,911.26 being used for local expenses, while $3,379.93 was given for the 
spread of the gospel throughout the world. 

The (Liberty Association has a special interest in our Orphanage, wilth th^ 
largest division of the Orphanage being located within her bounds. Also, with one 
exception, the Orphanage is caring for more children from Davidson County than 
from any other county in the State — 47 children from this county in 1935. In a 
peculiar sense, the Mills Home belongs to, and is ministering to the orphans of, 
the Liberty Association. 

We would recommend and strongly urge that every church of the Association 
set aside a definite Sunday in each month when the Sunday school offering will 
go to the Orphanage, then see to it that the money is sent promptly to the Treas- 
urer, R. D. Covington, Thomasville. Then let every church and Sunday school 
prepare for a real Thanksgiving offering for the Orphanage. This will take care 
of the needs of our Orphanage, which is rendering such a large and unselfish 
service within the Liberty Association. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. K. McGEE 

A DAY AT MILLS HOME 

Just when sleep seems the best and most refreshing, there goes that rising bell 
in, each cottage, telling us it is 6 o'clock and that the cooks have been up an hour 
and that breakfast will be ready in thirty minutes. Some take an extra wink or 
two and then what a hurrying as clothing is put on and beds made before they go 
to the dining room. Some cottages have their devotion at the morning meal, 
using the Calendar of Prayer given in Royal Service, asi a guide for the day. 

Breakfast over, dishes are carried to the kitchen and it is about time for the 
work bell at 7 o'clock. The boys and girls who work in other cottages than their 
own and to the various places of duty now leave. Some to the laundry; girls sew- 
ing room, boys sewing room (where the boys clothes are made and mended) ; to 
the barn and dairy where enough milk is procured to give a quart a day to each 
child; to the farm; poultry yard; print shop; to work with the plumber; carpen- 
ter; painter; supply room as the old central dining room is now called, and where 
over 200 big loaves of bread are made three times a week. During the summer the 
milk is placed in cold storage here and two children from each cottage come three 
times a day to carry the cooler of milk back to their building. Several girls are 
trained at the Infirmary to help take care of the children who come for treatment. 

When school is in session, those attending the morning classes do not leave the 
building until 7:40. Our school^ begins its session early as the boys and girls do 
not go but half the day and to give them four hours, necessitates this early hour 
for the opening session. Those going in the morning, work in the afternoon. At 
the midterm this is reversed. Mr. Skaggs is principal of our school and we have 
fifteen teachers. 

Each cottage needs at least two cooks and two housekeepers each half day. 
On the boys side, they are called houseboys for no boy wants to be called a house- 
keeper. These children under the supervision of their matron prepare the meals 
and do the sweeping and cleaning up necessary in trying to make our buildings 
as near like a home as possible. The house boy also tends the lawn and helps with 
the flowers. 

The morning session of school closes about 11:30 and most of the work stops 
at this time, so there is a wending toward the cottages, to see if there is any mail 



1 



9 



MINUTES OF THE 



on the table in the hall for them. How many times they are disappointed as some 
never get any mail. There is soon the welcome sound of the wash bell as they 
know it will only be a few minutes now until dinner is served and in a short time 
the dining room is filled with the clatter of dishes and the chatter of voices. 

At 1 o'clock the bells ring again calling back to work or school. A few minutes 
before five, school is dismissed and clothes are hurriedly changed and play is the 
next order of the program. 

As "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy," there are one or two pieces 
of playground equipment in the vicinity of each cottage as ocean waves, giant 
strides, seesaws, swings, tennis courts, besides the large ball diamond and football 
field. A number of baseball games have been played on our grounds this summer 
and the children seem never to tire attending there even when they are long drawn 
out affairs. The swimming pool has been a great blessing this year, especially since 
it has been so hot. The girls have the use of it for half a day and the boys the 
other half, alternating morning and afternoons so tliat all may have an oppor- 
tunity to enjoy this fine sport. Part of the old dining hall has been converted into 
a gymnasium where a good basketball court has been made and this is greatly 
enjoyed during the colder months. 

The library is another favorite place and many go there each day, seme only 
to see the comic sheet in the newspaper, but others with a desire for real reading. 

Once a month the Sunbeams, three B. A.'s, four G. A.'s and the Y. W. A.'s 
have a meeting. There are about two hundred enrolled in these organizations. 

The supper bell rings at 5:30 or later according to the age of the children in 
that building. The evening meal is enjoyed and all except the dish washers are 
out for a few minutes more of play before time for the study bell at 7 o'clock, or 
in the summer, at the ringing of this bell, each child musti report at his or her 
cottage. Feet are to be washed, stubbed toes bandaged, stone bruises soaked in 
hot water and plastered up with icthyol salve, and then on to the study hall for 
two hours, as this is required by the state to make the six hours work necessary 
to complete a grade in the school year. The children in grades below the fourth 
do not stay in the study hall this long. 

The last bell of the day is rung at 9 o'clock when the boys and girls retire to 
refresh tired bodies with sleep and to be ready the next morning for another day 
of work and play. 

MRS. I. P. FRAZIER 

7. At this time the Moderator appointed the following committees: 

COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS BY THE MODERATOR 

Finance — B. J. May, chairman; Maskey M. Smith, C. F. Motsinger, L. E. Tea- 
gue, George Wall. 

Time, Place and Preacher — ^Rev. E. F. Mumford, chairman; Rev. W. C. Dar- 
nell, C. C. Wrenn, V. K. Skeen, Rev. J. N. Bowman. 

On Nominations — Rev. W. L. Warfford, chairman; G. W. Miller, C. M. Wall, 
Sam J. Smith, Rev. W. K. McGee. 

To Nominate Officers for 1937— Rev. E. L. Bradley, Chairman; D. R. Bean- 
blossom, Rev. J. A. Neilson, Chas. Roach, C. H, Teague. 

On Obituaries — Rev. E. C. Roach, chairman; Rev. J. A. McMillan, Rev. Vann 
Carroll, I. G. Greer, B. R. Cross. 

VISITORS 

8. The following visitors were at this time recognized and given a welcome 
to the body: 

Rev. J. M. Hellard, of Piedmont Association; R. F. Terrell, representative of 
the Biblical Recorder, Raleigh, N. C; Dr. C. A. Rhyne and Dr. R. L. Lemmons, 
of Charlotte, N. C; Rev. M. O. Alexander, of the State Board, Raleigh, N. C; Smith 
Haggerman, Superintendent of Baptist "Hospital, Winston- Salem, N. C; L. L. Mor- 
gan, Raleigh, N. C, of the State Sunday School Board; J. F. Gaddy, of the Rowan 
Association. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



10 



ANNUAL SERMON 

9. The Annual Sermon was preached by Rev. J. A. Neilson, pastor of the Mills 
Home church. His subject and text was "Lord, What Will Thou Have Me Do?" 
The sermon was a challenge to all church members. 

10. The body adjourned at 12:15 P. M. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

11. In the absence of Rev. H. T. Penry the devotional was conducted by Rev. 
E. C. Roach, pastor of the Reeds church. 

REPORT ON STATE OF CHURCHES 

12. One minute reports are made by the following on the State of the churches: 
Abbotts Creek, D. S. Hayworth; Carolina Avenue, Mrs. A. J. Lowe; Center 

Hill, Rev. E. C. Roach; Churchland, W. H. Beck; Denton, Rev. Vann Carroll; 
Holloways, B. R. Beanblossom; Jersey, Rev. E. C. Roach; Lexington, G. W. Miller; 
Liberty, B. J. May; Lick Creek, Rev. Vann Carroll; Mills Home, Rev. J. A. Neilson; 
New Friendship, Mrs. A. J. Hartman; Oak Grove (S. S.), Marvin Hedrick; Pleas- 
ant Plains, Rev. Howard Hunt; Reeds, Rev. E. C. Roach; Rich Fork, Rev. E. N. C. 
Andrews; Sheets Memorial, Rev. W. L. Warfford; Southside, C. L. Matthews; 
Stoners Grove, C. C. Wrenn; Summerville, Carlie Carrick; Tabernacle (Etlanger); 
Mrs. B. L. Hames; Thomasville, L. E. Teague; Wallburg, Maskey M. Smith; Wal- 
ters Grove, D. R. Klass; Welcome, M. L. Craver. 

The above reports were made under the direction of Rev. E. N. C. Andrews, 
pastor of Rich Fork church. 

Further reports on the condition of the churches is made by Rev. W. L. Warf- 
ford as he called detail attention to items from a large blackboard, which showed 
the gifts, membership, Sunday school enrollment, etc., of each church. 

The four girls heretofore named again sang to the body, using the hymn, 
"Can the World See Jesus in You?" 

Rev. M. O. Alexander, of the State Board made an address at this time dis- 
cussing further the "State of the Churches." 

The following written report on State of the Churches was offered by Rev. 
Walter L. Warfford and was adopted. 

SUMMARY REPORT ON STATE OF CHURCHES 

Note some of the general gains in enrollment. During the year there has been 
528 additions to the churches; Sunday school enrollment has increased 56; B. T. U, 
increased in enrollment 47; W. M. U. increased in enrollment 40. It is to be noted 
also that we gave $234.00 more to the orphanage this year than last. Note that 
we gave $809.00 LESS THAN LAST YEAR TO THE COOPERATIVE PROGRAM. 
We note that we spent for local church expenses $13,349.00 more in this year than 
last year, while we raised for all purposes at home and outside objects, $13,680.00 
more than we raised in 1935. 

COMPARATIVE BUDGET PERCENTAGES OF 1935 AND 1936 

1935 1935 . 1936 1936 

Local Denom- Local Denom- 

Church inational Church inational 

Abbotts Creek 55% 45% 60% 40%* -'= 

Carolina Avenue 96% 4% 91% 9% 

Center Hill 84 7o 16% 71% 29% 

Churchland 74% 26% 75% 25% 

Denton 80% 20% 79% 21% 

Holloways 74% 26% 75% 25% 

Jersey 67% 33% 75% 25% 

Lexington 51% 49% 60% 40%** 

Liberty 80% 20% 83% 17% 

Lick Creek 70% 30% 94% 6% 

Mills Home 41% 59% 42% 58%* 

New Friendship 61% 39% 60% 40% -=* 



11 



MINUTES OP THE 



Reeds 91% 9% 76% 24% 

Rich Fork 82% 18% 81% 19% 

Sheets Memorial 85% 15% 90% 10% 

Smith Grove 91% 9% 89% 11% 

Southside 90% 10% 92% 8% 

Stoners Grove 82% 18% 86% 14% 

Summerville 89% 11% ^ 94% 6% 

Erlanger 84% 16% 95% 5% 

Taylors Grove 87% 13% 89% 11% 

Thomasville 72% 28% 81% 19% 

Wallburg 71% 29% 77% 23% 

Welcome 84% 16% 85% 15% 

Walters Grove 85% 15% 93% 7% 

Pleasant Plain 86% 14% 95% 5% 

* Indicates highest percentages to benevolence — MILLS HOME. 
** Indicates second highest percentage to benevolence (Note that three 
churches are tied for second place, Abbotts Creek, New Friendship and Lexington.) 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF AND BAPTIST HOSPITALS 

13. The report on Ministerial Relief, written by Dr. C. R. Sharpe, was read by 
Sam J. Smith. Motion is made for its adoption. The report on Hospitals was 
read by Rev. J. A. Neilson, upon motion to adopt; the report on Baptist Hospital 
was discussed by Smith Hagerman, superintendent of the hospital. The reports 
were adopted. 

RELIEF REPORT 

More than eighteen years ago the Relief and Annuity Board was organized 
and commissioned by Southern Baptists to provide as far as possible a worthy 
stipend for all aged ministers and the widows of ministers who are in need. This 
board was also commissioned to help ministers to provide against the day of old 
age and need through a contributory annuity plan. I shall not attempt to remind 
you here of just what has been accomplished by this board, but I declare to you 
that the amount of stipends paid to beneficiaries by Southern Baptists is any- 
thing but worthy of so great a people. If I am correctly informed, in the year 
nineteen hundred thirty-five the monthly allocations for men was $4.75, and for 
women, a few cents less. 

What will stimulate us to worthy action in this matter of caring for our work- 
ers after age or infirmity has rendered them helpless? I submit that our first and 
greatest concern should be to create a denominational conscience on this subject. 
How can this best be accomplished? A faithful minister of the gospel does not 
hesitate to plead the cause of missions, orphanage work and the several objects 
of the Convention Program, but where is there one even among the most faithful 
and courageous of our ministers who would not hesitate to present the v/ork of 
the Relief and Annuity Board to his people? We read that Paul strongly urged 
this duty upon the churches at Corinth and Galatia. At first, even to Paul, it 
seemed a delicate matter and he too hesitated for a tim.e. It seems to me that the 
creating of a denominational conscience with respect to a more adequate pro- 
vision for the care of aged and infirm ministers of the gospel and their depend- 
ents must be undertaken and carried on by the lay members of the churches. 

Finally, may I raise this question v/ith each of you What were the implica- 
tions and applications of Deut. 12-19 where we read, "Take heed to thyself that 
thou forsake not the Levite as long as thou livest upon the earth." 

C. R. SHARPE 



HOSPITAL REPORT 

It is written of Jesus that He "went about all Galilee teaching in their syna- 
gogues, and preaching the gospel of the Kingdom, and HEALING ALL MANNER 
OF DISEASE among the people." And we read that the people "brought unto 
Him ALL SICK PEOPLE . . . AND HE HEALED THEM." Healing is a vital part 
of our Christian ministry; it was included in the program of Jesus; it should be 
included in ours. The medium for this ministry is our Baptist Hospital in Win- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



12 



ston-Salem. Since its opening on May 28, 1923, 32,000 have entered for treatment. 
Last year, 1935, 3,753 patients were taken care of by this great institution. To 
help carry on the ministry of heaUng, there are 66 doctors and 50 nurses, and we 
are greatly indebted to these doctors for the service they render free of charge to 
those who are unable to pay. About one-half of the patients received pay little 
or nothing. 

While contributions have been generous, they ought to be increased, as the 
Hospital is continually enlarging its service, and more and more patients are 
coming for treatment each year. Outside of our Orphanage, there is no greater 
investment we can make than to support our Baptist Hospital and thus relieve 
much suffering, and save precious lives. 

We strongly recommend that Mother's Day offerings be taken in ALL our 
churches and we ask that all of us pray earnestly for Brother Hagaman and his 
staff, backing up our praying with generous giving. 

"When saw we Thee sick . . . and came unto Thee!" 

"Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these ... ye have done 
it unto me." 

J. A. NEILSON 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

14. The report on Christian Education was brought at this time. The report 
was discussed by Rev. W. L. Warfford and was adopted. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Robert E. Speer said, "We need not simply education, but Christian education 
training that issues in religious conviction and Christian personality. Our strength 
lies in the intelligent religious convictions of our people. In the more comprehen- 
sive sense of the term the whole problem of the church is now more clearly seen 
to be one of education. We have to bring every available resource to bear to make 
the home, the pulpit, the Sunday school, the day school, the university, the theo- 
logical seminary, all our educational factors efficient in carrying out the great 
task of training men and women in Christian character." 

To be physically able to do manual labor we are urged to eat wholesome food 
three times a day with the proper exercise. 

To be spiritually able to do our Christian duties we must have the proper dieb 
in Christian education. Christian education begins or should begin in the home. 
If we do not have the proper home environment with the Bible to read and study, 
church papers, Biblical Recorder, Charity and Children, Home and Foreign Fields, 
and other good magazines and books to read we can't hope for a good foundation 
in Christian education. 

The Sunday school, the church, the various organizations such as the Baptist 
Training Union which includes all members of the church in Christian training 
and the Woman's Missionary Union are valuable and influential for each and 
every Christian. Then our schools and colleges have a place of large influence 
in the lives of many young men and women. It is very essential that we have 
Christian teachers and professors for Second Corinthians three two says (II Cor. 
3:2): Ye are our epistle written in our hearts, known and read of all men. The 
influence of the things and the persons with which and with whom a child comes 
in frequent contact, determines, in a large way, what the child's future attitudes 
and conduct will be. 

We hang our heads in shame at the attitude some of our people are taking 
when they are approving the dance at our Wake Forest College which has been 
endowed and supported by Baptists to provide Christian education. May we trust 
and pray that dancing will not be authorized at the college and shall continue* 
to support our college wholeheartedly. 

The gospel transforms lives and Christians are most widely read gospel. 
Some one said, "The sinners' open Bible is not the one beginning with Genesis 
and ending with Revelation; it is the daily lives of Christians all around them." 
May we ever heed the Great Commission of our Lord and Master. 

ELIZABETH SMITH 

15. Sam J. Smith, Treasurer, made his report at this time, which was adopted 



13 



MINUTES OF THE 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR LIBERTY ASSOCIATION— 1935 SESSION 

Receipts 



Deficit paid by Sam J. Smith $ 14.76 

Abbotts Creek 6.00 

Carolina Avenue 2.00 

Center Hill 1.25 

Churchland 6.00 

Denton 6.50 

Hollo ways 3.00 

Jersey 3.00 

Lexington 30.00 

Liberty 3.00 

Lick Creek 2.50 

New Friendship 6.50 

Mills Home 12.00 

Pleasant Plains 1.50 

Reeds 5.00 

Rich Fork 5.00 

Smith Grove 3.00 

Southside 3.00 

Stoners Grove 3.50 

Summerville 2.50 

Tabernacle 5.00 

Taylors Grove 1.00 

Thomasville 16.00 

Wallburg 5.00 

Walters Grove 1.35 

Welcome 3.00 

Sheets Memorial 00 



Total Receipts $151.36 $151.36 

Disbursements 

Postage $ 4.50 

Stationery (Rose Press) 5.00 

Printing Minutes 95.00 

Phone Calls 70 

Paid S. J. Smith, Balance on 1935 Acct 16.16 

Retained for my service as Clerk for 1935 30.00 



Total Disbursements $151.36 $151.36 



SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer 

16. Adjourned at 4:00 P. M. to reconvene tomorrow morning at 9:45 A. M. 

THE SECOND DAY 

WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 

17. The devotional is conducted by Rev. Walter L. Warfford, pastor the Sheets 
Memorial church, with prayer by Rev. J. D. Newton, Thomasville, N. C. 

18. In the absence of Rev. E. L. Bradley, chairman of the committee to nomi- 
nate officers, the report was read by Rev. W. L. Warfford. 

C. M. Wall makes motion that Rev. W. K. McGee cast the ballot for the Body 
for the officers recommended. The ballot was cast by Rev. McGee. 

Report of Committee to Nominate Officers for 1937 

We recommend to the Body the following: For Moderator — R. D. Covington, 
Thomasville, N. C; For Vice Moderator— G. W. Miller, Lexington, N. C; For Clerk 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



14 



and Treasurer — Sam J. Smith, Lexington, N. C. 

Signed, 

EARLE L. BRADLEY, 

C. H. TEAGUE, 
W. C. ROACH, 

D. R. BEANBLOSSOM, 
J. A. NEILSON, 

Committee to Nominate Officers 

W. M. U. 

19. The report of the Woman's Missionary Union was brought by Mrs. Louis 
S. Gaines, of Lexington, N. C. 

On motion to adopt, the report was discussed by Miss Sallie McCracken, Mrs. 
B. P. Duncum, Mrs. Louis S. Gaines, Rev. W. K. McGee, Rev. M. O. Alexander, 
Mr. R. K. Wilhams and Rev. E. F. Mumford. The report was adopted. 

REPORT OF WOMEN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
Liberty Association, September 9, 1936 

The Women's Missionary Union of Liberty Baptist Association is happy to re- 
port that the year's work has been most gratifying. Our financial goal for the 
year has been reached. This does not mean, however, that the W. M. U. feels that 
the time to rest has come. That time will never come so long as unsaved people 
remain on the earth, and so long as the hearts of God's believing children are at- 
tuned to His Divine will. 

The annual meeting was held in April with the First Baptist church of Lex- 
ington. The meeting was largely attended, and was remarkable for the enthusiasm 
manifested in the co-operation of the existing societies, and the determination to 
carry forward the work of the future. A high spiritual tone was maintained 
throughout the day by such speakers as Mrs. Stamps, of China, who brought a 
truly inspirational message on foreign missions; Mrs. Edna R. Harris, Correspond- 
ing Secretary, and Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, of Greensboro, recently elected President 
of the W. M. U. of North Carolina. 

The leaders of the Associational work are Miss Sallie McCracken, Superintend- 
ent, and Miss Ola Crowder, Young People's leader. 

At the meeting of the Charlotte Division held in Winston-Salem the societies 
of this Association were well represented. The Divisional Superintendent, Mrs. B. 
K. Mason, had provided a splendid program. 

In March the State W. M. U. meeting was held at the First Baptist church in 
Raleigh. This was a meeting of great significance as special programs were given 
for three outstanding events. The Henrietta Hall Shuck Centennial, the Fiftieth 
Anniversary of the founding of Sunbeams, and the retirement of Mrs. Wesley N. 
Jones from the presidency of the W. M. U. of North Carolina. Mrs. Jones has 
served many decades as a leader, and now her assistance will be greatly sought as 
a councillor and advisor in the state work. 

Of the 26 churches in Liberty Association 16 report women'ls organizations 
and 13 report at least one organization for the young people. New Friendship has 
a fully graded A-1 organization and several others are near the attainment of 
this standard. The work among the young people needs greater emphasis and 
calls for the unselfish service of leaders and councillors. Unfortunately, the work 
lags, not because of a lack of young people, or the want of a message, but because 
of the difficulty in securing conscientious and consecrated leaders. It seems un- 
fortunate that 10 churches do not have their women organized for mission, doc- 
trinal and devotional study. They, indeed, are missing much. 

The W. M. U. of this Association has given approximately $310 this- year for 
the Hundred Thousand Club. In this way the women are worshipping Jesus, and 
truly laying gifts at His feet as they strive to aid in the retirement of the debts 
on our mission boards. Southern Baptists find, as do individuals, that debts are 
difficult to pay off, and in the Hundred Thousand Club movement they are 
bravely and faithfully doing this hard task. The example set before the world is 
two-fold, that of moral responsibility and of loving, self- sacrificial giving. Ti'uly, 
this "over-and-above-giving" means much to the Kingdom, and gives us an en- 



15 



MINUTES OF THE 



larged vision of what can be accomplished when we really have "converted purses." 

Of the many phases of work emphasized by the W. M. U., mission study and 
personal service stand out prominently as complements to each other. The mis- 
sion study work is instructive as well as inspirational — ^for it is an accepted fact 
that we manifest the most interest in that subject about which we know the most. 
In the recommended courses of study the devotional and doctrinal books are given 
a prominent place, also books on soul winning, as well aS numerous books telling 
of the gracious work carried on at home and abroad. "The Church School of Mis- 
sions" constitutes a practical and an ideal way of reaching an entire church mem- 
bership with this needed information. At least one church has had such a school, 
and others have conducted their mission studies with slight variations of this plan. 
When entire families — children, mothers, and even fathers become acutely inter- 
ested in spiritual affairs and the furtherance of missions, then and only then will 
we begin to realize a little of God's plan for this old world. 

Personal service is the putting into practice of that which we have learned. 
In other words, it is Practical Christianity, for therein we strive to help our fel- 
low-beings. All too often we fail to bring it to its richest culmination in failing 
to speak of Hm who came to save sinners. Thus many opportunities are lost to 
speak for Christ and show some lost soul a Saviour. Many may be reached spir- 
itually as their physical needs are supplied. In fact, soul winning should be the 
burning desire of each Christian heart. 

Any report of the W. M. U. of this Association would be incomplete without 
a reference to the Rev. and Mrs. Ishmael Negrin, of Cruces, Cuba. Mrs. Negrin, 
being from our midst, is dearly beloved here at home, and this past summer our 
hearts were frequently wrung as we beheld a weary, ill family attempting to re- 
gain health and strength in too short a time. Fortunately, no record has been 
kept of the help rendered lovingly to these dear people as gifts of money, clothing, 
food and supplies for them personally and for their work in Cuba were graciously 
given. Truly, we have not allowed our left hand to know what the right hand 
has done in this good work. Would that we could abandon ourselves to all work 
for Him in this manner. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. LOUIS S. GAINES 

Mission Reports 

20. In the absence of Henry Lomax, who prepared the report on State Mis- 
sions, the report was read by Rev. H. T. Penry, of Southmont. 

The report on Home Missions was read by Rev. J. D. Newton, of Thomasville. 

The report on Foreign Missions was read by Rev. Vann Carroll, of Denton. 

Upon motion to adopt, the three reports were discussed by Rev. Vann Carroll 
and Rev. J. M. Hilliard, of High Point. 

Rev. M. O. Alexander, of the State Board, at this time delivered an address 
on State, Home and Foreign Missions. 

The reports were adopted. 

STATE MISSIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA, 1936 

The spirit and motive of Missions, Foreign, Home and State, are identical. It 
is difficult to understand why one should piofess to believe in one and not in che 
other. The objectives, however, are slightly different. Within the State a dis- 
tinction is made between Missions, Christian Education and Benevolence — includ- 
ing the Orphanage and the Hospital — whereas Foreign Missions, and with some 
limitations Home Missions, includes all of these objects. What then if included 
under the head of "State Missions?" 

For a hundred years the objective of State Missions had been to win the peo- 
ple of North Carolina to Christ and then to the fellowship which the churches 
provide. In more recent years, notably during the past quarter of a century, an- 
other objectives has been to train and develop those who come into the churches. 
With these purposes dominant. State Missions now embrace the following activities: 

1. Missionary Pastoral Assistance. "To the poor the Gospel is preached" in 
needy and strategic places. Many of our strong churches in the state are trophies 
of State Missions, At present about 160 churches are aided. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



16 



2. Student Work. Churches in educational centers are aided in order that they 
may properly minister to students away from home and the home church. 

3. A Sunday School and a Baptist Training Union Department are maintained. 
Through these agencies the church membership is taught and stimulated to the 
end that the church member may devote not only a life but a trained life. 

4. Church Building. At the present time, in the face of a serious shortage of 
funds, several churches, some of them in educational centers, are being aided in 
paying for adequate church plant. 

5. Oteen Hospital. For some years past the Board has made it possible for 
Rev. Wayne Williams to minister to the sick veterans in the Government Hospital 
at Oteen. 

6. Indians. The State Mission Board is responsible for giving the Gospel to 
the Indians in Roseson County. Rev. and Mrs. M. C. Lunsford have been work- 
ing there for several years, 

7. Negroes. Beginning with 1935 the Baptist Convention undertook some co- 
operative work with the Negro State Convention. After careful search a man was 
found in the person of Rev. W. C. Somerville, who undertook the task of arousing 
and enlisting the quarter of a million Negro Baptists in the State. The Conven- 
tion is continuing this work, and the success which Brother Somerville is aciiiev- 
ing brings real gladness to the hearts of all those who believe we ought to co- 
operate in every way possible with our Negro brethren. 

8. General Missionaries. There are two, M. O. Alexander and J. C. Pipes. Mr. 
Pipes spends his full time in the western area of the state. These men spend 
their time in holding revivals, visiting general meetings, helping church to get to- 
gether in fields, etc. Another man could be used in this work to great advan- 
tage. The state is too large to be covered by only two men. 

State Missions, however, in conjunction with Christian Education, has an- 
other function, and one which is probably more important than any of those men- 
tioned above. In a very vital sense. Foreign Missions and Home Missions, as v/ell 
as all other objects, wait upon an aggressive program of State Missions and 
Christian Education. These agencies are the S. O. S., the Service of Supply, for 
all other agencies. During the World War there were Combat Divisions living 
in the trenches or near the front. But behind the lines, and reaching all the way 
to the United States, was a continuous line of men and women serving those who 
were on the front. Had they failed in their service of supply to those on the 
front, disaster would have been inevitable. If likewise State Missions fails, re- 
treat and perhaps disaster will, and ought, to overtake us as a people in our For- 
eign and Home Mission efforts. Let us, therefore, maintain an aggressive pro- 
gram of State Missions. In so doing we shall not only win North Carolina but 
the world. !i 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. H. LOMAX 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

The mission fields of our Home Board may be named as follows: 1. A num- 
ber of missionaries are supported amongst the Indian population of what is known 
as the Federal reservations in several of our states; 2. The need is great in many 
of our larger cities for intensive labors amongst the neglected parts of the popu- 
lation; 3. In Cuba and Panama there are large sections where our Board is seek- 
ing to place missionaries who are willing and anxious to preach and live for the 
glory of the Master; 4. There is a population of ten million of the Negro race who 
are making appeals to our Board to render them at least a small amount of spir- 
itual evidence; 5. The immense numbers of foreign population in our country. 

What is said to be a fact which should stimulate all Christian denominations 
to bestir their energies, is that 60 per cent of our population in this country do 
not attend any church. 

But there is much encouragement which stimulates the Board to press on in 
its labors in behalf of the classes which are named above. Many thousands are 
reported as being saved by the power of the Word of God each year. 

J. D. NEWTON 



17 



MINUTES OF THE 



REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

91 years ago our fathers met in Augusta, Georgia, and launched the foreign 
mission enterprise of Southern Baptists. We are profoundly grateful to Almighty 
God for the marvelous way in which He has led us through these years. 

The Foreign Mission Board is making a careful and accurate survey of its 
work in all lands so that an intelligent and adequate program of rehabilitation 
and enlargement can be undertaken as soon as possible. To this end, the Execu- 
tive Secretary, accompanied by Dr. and Mrs. L. R. Scarborough, of Texas, sailed 
from New York on May 23rd for a visit to our mission work in Brazil, Argentine, 
Uruguay and Chile. 

Some data from July, 1935, to April, 1936: 118 missionaries on furlough or 
retired; 91 missionaries reappointed and appointed to fields; thus 27 less on fields. 
Total number of missionaries on field, 418. Total number of churches, 1,665. Total 
number of baptisms for the year, 13,982. Total membership, 198,640. 

Now, look at our financial situation. During the past ten years our financial 
condition has compelled us to cut in a very drastic way our work in all the 15 
countries in which we are working. Not many new missionaries have been sent. 
The property of the Board has not been repaired in any adequate way, and much 
of it is rapidly going to pieces for lack of repairs. In addition, there is a debt of 
$440,000.00 

This is a dark picture, but the dawn is breaking. During the past year we re- 
duced our debt $150,000.00. And our Board, through a special committee, has 
made a careful and detailed study of the minimum needs of each mission and sta- 
tion and has formulated a minimum forward looking plan for the next three years 
ahead. The first itam in the program is to pay off the debt by the end of 1938. 

Moreover, the Foreign Mission Board has pledged itself before the Convention 
to live within its income and pay its debt. We will be unable to send the mis- 
sionaries at home on furlough back to their fields of labor and fulfill this pledge 
unless our receipts increase during the next few months. 

At this point it is interesting to note that each year an increasing number of 
fri»8nds are remembering the Foreign Mission Board in their wills. $17,487.25 
came in this way last year. 

This past year the Board granted Miss Inabelle Coleman, publicity secretary, 
a leave of absence for five months to visit the Orient to secure more accurate and 
worthwhile information. Read her inspiring and stirring articles in our papers. 

Another thing the Board did was to elect Rev. Claude B. Bowen as Educational 
Secretary. It is his duty to create a more comprehensive and intensive policy of 
missionary education in our churches and educational institutions in order to get 
more missionaries with the best qualifications. Also, it is his duty to find the 
most suitable men and women for the different kinds of work and fields. 

Mission study books are of tremendous importance to our mission work. 
This year we will study Africa. Books for the different ages are available. "Basil 
Lee Lockett — ^A Beloved Physician," by Mrs. Lockett, promises to be one of the 
most popular mission study books we have had for years. 

Respectfully submitted, 
VAN CARROLL 

21. Rev. W. L. Warfford, chairman of the Associational Executive Promotion 
Committee, offered the following recommendations from his committee. 
The recommendations were adopted by the body. 

The Executive Promotion Committee brings the following recommendations, 
after having carefully considered the following plans: 

1. In accordance with the suggested goal for the Liberty Association, we should 
endeavor to raise $12,000.00 during the next Associational year for the Cooperative 
Program. This goal having been divided out to the churches according to their 
apparent ability, the churches asked to consider their goals and report back at the 
general meeting of the Association in 1936. 

3. The committee further recommends that we promote in every church in 
our Association a Stewardship school in accordance with the following plans: 

a. Each church will select at least one person who is capable to use as a teach- 
er in a stewardship school in his or her church, or a neighboring church. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



18 



b. That the teachers thus selected, come together for a period of preliminary 
study under Brother M. O. Alexander in preparation to teach in stewardship 
schools in the churches. 

The Executive-Promotion Committee feels that if the above plans can be car- 
ried through in the churches of the Liberty Association it will prove stimulating 
to all kingdom interests in our churches. 

22. Rev. E. C. Roach, chairman of the committee brought the report on obitu- 
aries, which was adopted. 

The audience stood in respect and memory of our deceased members, while the 
list was read, a song sung and a prayer offered by Rev. Roach. 
For a complete list of names, see page 21. 

23. The Association adjourned at 12:15 P. M. to reconvene at 1:30 P. M. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

24. The devotional is conducted by Rev. W. C. Darnell, pastor of the Sum- 
merville church. Prayer by Rev. J. A. Neilson. 

25. The report on Temperance and Public Morals in the absence of Rev. L. J. 
Matthews is read by Rev. E. F. Mumford, pastor of Abbotts Creek. 

On motion to adopt, the report is discussed by Rev. E. F. Mumford and is 
adopted. 

TEMPERANCE AND MORALS 

If we, in this report should attempt to even mention all of the intemperance 
and immoral conduct of Christian people, to say nothing of the outside world, it 
is to be feared that we would be occupied until the going down of the sun. There 
are some facts so blazoned before us that those who are slowest to detect evil are 
able to discern them. It is showing wisdom not to ignore the question so often 
asked, "What is the matter with the church?" It would be foolish to refuse to be 
pJParmed over the loss of influence that our religion has on the world. There are 
many things that may be the cause for such a condition. But we believe this has 
come about because some of the foundation principles have been removed. 

First of all we are living in a day when human life is cheap. A daily news- 
paper will tell the whole story. The person on the highway does not consider the 
sacredness of life but the speed of his car. The security of our civilization rests 
upon our regard for human life. The Prince of Life came that life may be saved. 

Again, the home is in a tragic condition. It was once the custom in the Amer- 
ican home to have a period of worship before retiring at night. We today no 
longer feel the need of calling the family together for Bible reading and prayer 
at the close of day. With the going of the family altar the home has lost restraint 
and most of us are without our sense of God's presence. 

With the removing of their basic principles there has come a deluge of evils 
that loom up before us and make us to shudder. With the break- down of the 
home profanity was never so prevalent. We used to think it was bad for a man 
to curse; now his wife and daughters, or sisters and sweetheart curse with him. 
Formerly a man would ask permission to smoke in the presence of women, now 
the women not only smoke with him but drink. A century ago it was the Bible; 
now it is bridge and billiards. Sunday baseball attracts a much larger crowd 
than the churches. Sunday movies are crowded while churches close their doors. 
Our prisons, penitentaries and reformatories are filled to the capacity. The larger 
per cent of present day reading material glorifies immodest dress, sex irregularity, 
gambling, drinking and divorce decrees. 

Surely the hour has come when we must "Seek first the Kingdom of God." 
This association will have met in vain if we fail to kindle in those present a holy 
passion to cleanse our churches and proclaim God's Word against wickedness. 
"Let u^ therefore come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, 
and find grace to help in time of need." Hebrews 4:16. 

Respectfully submitted, 
L. J. MATTHEWS 



19 



MINUTES OF THE 



SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

26. The report on Sunday Schools is brought by Conrad Motsinger. On mo- 
tion to adopt, the report was discussed by Mr. Motsinger. 

An address on Sunday Schools was delivered by L. L. Morgan of the State 
Sunday School Board. The report was adopted. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

The Sunday school is the church organized for work and not a separate or- 
ganization from the church. The great task before the churches, through the 
Sunday school organization, is to reach, teach, win, guide and enlist the large 
number of people who are not attending Sunday school or church. 

Statistics show that the white population of Liberty Association is 42,629. Of 
this number, 14,100 are enrolled in all the Sunday schools of all denominations. 
This leaves 28,529 people not enrolled in any Sunday school. Our last minutes 
of the Association show that 6,271 are enrolled in our Baptist Sunday schools, 
which is 44% of the total enrollment. On this same percentage basis, the Baptist 
of Liberty Association are responsible for 12,553 people who are not now enrolled 
in Sunday school, or twice the number we now have enrolled. Jesus saith, -'Lift 
up your eyes, and look on the fields; for they are white already to harvest." 

There has been some progress made in our Sunday schools during the past 
year. Training classes have been taught in several churches and enlargement 
campaigns have been held in at least four churches. We now have one standard 
Sunday school and others within one or two points of it. Associational workers 
have been elected for the Beginner, Intermediate, Young People, Adult and Home 
Extension Departments. We have not yet been able to secure workers for the 
Cradle Roll, Primary and Junior Departments. 

The great need of our Association is more trained officers and teachers who 
are willing to give their best to teaching the Bible to those whom we hope to en- 
roll. The Associational Sunday school organization recommends that a training 
class be taught in every church this year. The Sunday School Board suggests 
October as the ideal month for this. We also recommend that an Association- wide 
Sunday school revival be held sometime during 1937. We, also, need to grade our 
Sunday schools as only seven were reported graded last year. 

The task is before us. What will we do about it? I say let us arise and go 
out after — 

"These thousands who are waiting for somebody. 
Watching and waiting today. 
Somebody to lift up and strengthen. 
Somebody to shield and stay." 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. F. MOTSINGER 

27. The report on Baptist Training Unions was brought by Mrs. C. M. How- 
ell. On motion to adopt, the report was discussed by Mrs. Howell and was adopted. 

LIBERTY B. T. U. REPORT 

Last September the Liberty Association elected Wilfred Eddinger to organize 
an Associational B. T. U. In November he called a meeting of all leaders, presi- 
dents and pastors and organized the Union. G. G. Pridgen was elected director. 
There was not very much accomplished until March. The organization is grow- 
ing and each quarter that we meet we find more interest and enthusiasm. 

The last meeting was held in August with 177 present and 11 churches repre- 
sented. 12 new unions have been organized, making a total of 65. 

In July the Director was able to secure 10 state workers, assisted by Rev. J. A. 
Neilson, to teach study courses in the following churches, Carolina Avenue, South- 
side, Lick Creek, Denton, Rich Fork and First church of Thomasville. There were 
over 300 awards presented at this time. Somie of the other churches in the Asso- 
ciation had study courses in March and April and a number of awards were 
given then. 

In July, 11 delegates attended the B. T. U. assembly at Ridge Crest and all 
came back bubbling over with pep and enthusiasm and eager to build new unions 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



20 



during the next 12 months. 

The aim this year is a B. T. U. in every church, and any church desiring to 
organize a union please get in touch with G. G. Pridgen, Director of B. T. U., 
Thomasville, N. C. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. C. M. HOWELL, Asso. Director 

28. Rev. E. F. Mumford, chairman of committee on Time, Place and Preacher, 
made the following report, which was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER FOR 1937 

We recommend to the Body: 

Time — Tuesday and Wednesday after the first Sunday in September, 1937. 

Place — Churchland. 

Preacher— Rev. W. K. McGee. 

Alternate Preacher — Rev. L. J. Matthews. 

SPRING SESSION 

Place — 'Denton. 

Time — Friday before Third Sunday in April. 
Preacher — Rev. L. S. Gaines. 

C. C. WRENN, 

REV. J. N. BOWMAN, 

REV. W. C. DARNELL, 

V. K. SKEEN, 

E. F. MUMFORD, 

Committee on Time, Place, Etc. 

29. Rev. W. L. Warfford makes the report of the committee on Nominations, 
which was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 

We recommend to the Body: 

Program committee for 1937: The Moderator and Clerk of the Association, 
Pastor of the church with which the next session meets, and Rev. W. L. Warfford, 
Lexington, N. C. 

For Orphanage Representative: Mary Misenheimer, Lexington, N. C. 

Committee on Digest of Church Letters for 1937: Sam J. Smith, Lexington, 
N. C, Rev. Walter L. Warfford, Lexington, N. C. 

For Chairman of Executive Promotion Committee: Rev. Walter L. Warfford, 
Lexington, N. C. 

For names of parties named to bring the Reports for next year see page 4. 

30. Sam J. Smith offers the following resolution, which on motion of Rev. 
E. F. Mumford is adopted by a rising vote. 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS 

Be it resolved that we, the Liberty Association extend to the Pastor, Members 
and Friends of the Reeds church our sincere thanks and gratitude for the abund- 
ant and kindly entertainment, which they have given us, while in their midst. 

And to Mr. R. G. Shoaf, of Lexington, N. C, for the beautiful basket of flow- 
ers given in honor of his grandfather, J. H. Walser. 

SAM J. SMITH 

Adjournment at 3:30 P. M. 



SAM J. SMITH, 
Clerk 



R. D. COVINGTON, 
Moderator 



21 



MINUTES OF THE 



IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE WHO HAVE GONE TO 
THEIR REWARD SINCE OUR LAST SESSION 

"Blessed are the Dead, which die in the Lord'* 
"In My Father's House are Many Mansions" 

ABBOTTS CREEK: 



Mrs. Julia A. Teague 

CENTER HILL: 

Mrs. Alice Owens 
Mrs. Alice Palmer 

CHURCHLAND: 
Mr. J. Tom Barnes 
Mrs. Henry Grubb 
Mr. Clay Grubb 
Mrs. C. A. Barnes 

DENTON: 

Mrs. W. B. Russell 
Mr. H. L. Gallimore 
Mr. Roby Snider 

HOLLOWAYS: 
Mrs. W. H. Johnson 
Mr. H. L. Crook 

JERSEY: 
Mr. Clarence Smith 

LEXINGTON: 
Mr. Whit Spurgeon 
Mrs. Minnie Sink 
Mr. C. L. Cogrgins 
Mrs. John H. Rogers 

LIBERTY: 
Mrs. Emily Ward 
Mr. Ivey Dorsett 

LICK CREEK: 
Mr. J. Earl Skeen 

NEW FRIENDSHIP: 
Mr. A. F. Hurley 
Mrs. Amanda Newsom 
Mrs. G. C. Willard 
Mrs. Sarah Bell Sink 
Mrs. Huldah Teague 
Mr. Gilmer Snider 

REEDS: 

Mr. D. C. Craver 
Mr. J. N. Myers 
Mr. A. B. Craver 
Mrs. L. A. Mallard 
Miss Eliza Wood 



RICH FORK: 

Mr. D. R. Cates 

Mrs. Tabitha Leonard 

SHEETS MEMORIAL: 
Mr. Jim Smith 
Mr. Jim Cooper 

SMITH GROVE: 
Mrs. T. E. Lassiter 
Mrs. Mattie Queen 

STONERS GROVE 
Mr. S. N. Wolf 
Miss Mary P. Warfford 

SUMMERVILLE: 
Mrs. Sandy Gallimore 
Mrs. Claytie Shipton 

TABERNACLE: 

Mrs. F. M. Freeman 
Mrs. W. L. Chester 
Mrs. J. H. Shytle 

WALLBURG: 

Mrs. E. E. Jenkins 
Mr. Eugene Smith 

WALTERS GROVE: 
Mrs. Edna Cody 

THOMAS VILLE: 

Mrs. D. M. Clemmons 
Mrs. M. C. Elledge 
Mr. W. M. Stawks 
Mrs. Ha Pope 
Mr. T. H. Hilliard 
Mr. E. G. Perdue 
Mr. Will Sykes 
Mrs. M. E. Parrish 

WELCOME: 
Mrs. Lenora Moss 
Mrs. Martha Sowers 



E. C. Roach 
Van Carroll 
I. G. Greer 
B. R. Cross 
J. A. McMillan 

Committee on Obituaries 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



22 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish the gospel (as 
we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the association, and to co-operate 
with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the association, 
pastors of the churches in the association, and messengers from the churches. 
Each church shall be entitled to three messengers and one additional messenger 
for every 50 members or fraction thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, vice-modera- 
tor, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected each year by the associa- 
tion at its annual meeting and shall hold office until their successors are elected. 
The duties of the officers shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in 
like organizations, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee each year 
whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached in all parts of the 
association, and to attend to all business in the association between the session 
and to make such reports as they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the 
association. The association may appoint or elect such other boards or commit- 
tees from time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually on Tuesday after the first 
Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request of the Executive Com- 
mittee change the time or the place of meeting of this association when it may 
be deemed by him not expedient to meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive Committee may 
fill any vacancy occurring between meeting of the association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular session of the 
association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of Order for 
Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 

Churches that fail to contribute to benevolences inasmuch as the Liberty 
Association has as its chief function the propagation of a missionary spirit 
among our people, and inasmuch as a church which fails to contribute to bene- 
ficences outside its local budget fails to justify its claim of being a missionary 
Baptist church, we therefore recommend that a church which contributes nothing 
to missionary objects beyond its borders have the fellowship of the association 
removed from it, if after a year from its report to the association it shows no im- 
provement in its gifts. 

See page 12, 1928 Minutes. 

DATE OF CLOSING ASSOCIATIONAL YEAR CHANGED 

In order that the committee on the Digest of Church Letters might have 
their report ready for the first day of the Association in the future. Rev. Walter 
Warfford, of Lexington, makes motion that our Association year close with the 
last Sunday in August each year, and that immediately after this date the dif- 
ferent church clerks prepare their letters and mail them to the Clerk of the As- 
sociation. 

See page 29, 1931 Minutes. 

ADVISORY BOARD OR COMMITTEE 

1. We recommend that this Executive Committee be abolished. 



23 



MINUTES OF THE 



That a board, to be known as the Advisory Board, be appointed by the As- 
sociation. 

1. That this board be composed of one member elected by each church in 
the Association, with the Moderator, Clerk and all pastors ex officio members. 

2. That there shall be a chairman of the board appointed from the member- 
ship thereof by the Association. 

3. That there shall be a Secretary to the board appointed from the mem- 
bership thereof by the Association. 

4. That the chairman and secretary be elected from the board and by the 
board after this year. 

5. That this board shall have the right and power to fill by appointment 
any vacancy or vacancies which may occur upon the recommendation from the 
church from which such vacancy or vacancies may occur. 

6. That this board shall be at all times subject to the Acts of the Association. 
See 1933 Minutes. 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



WHERE HELD 



I IJamestown 

I Holloways 

I Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 
Hollowaj^s 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creels 
Reeds X Roads 
3Big- Creek 
IJamestown 
Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 

I No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big- Creek 
2Pine Meeting- H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 
I Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

Summerville 
I Lexington 



PREACHER 



Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Elli Carroll 
.Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 

Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stoke.s 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Reid 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
VAi Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
IJenjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
TI. Morten 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 



CLERK 



Peter' Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter OAven 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah "SVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Vzariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
By Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



24 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year WHERE HELD 



I Abbotts Creek 
I Lick Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
New Friendship 
Jersey 
2Pine Meeting- H 
Hig-h Point 
Kernersville 
Holloways 
Pleasant Grove 
Denton 
SPiney Grove 
Rich Fork 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lexing-ton 
Lick Creek 
Jersey 
2Pine Meeting- H 
Nev" Friendship 
1 Thomasville 
I Wallburg- 
I Denton 
I Liberty 
Orphanag-e 
Abbotts Creek 
Stoners Grove 
Rich Fork 
Holloways 
Center Hill 
Wallburg- 
Smith Grove 
Lexing-ton 
Denton 

New Friendship 
Churchland 
Summerville 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds 
Liberty 
Rich Fork 
Thomasville 
Holloways 
Stoners Grove 
I Abbotts Creek 
I Denton 
I Lexing-ton 
I Lick Creek 
I Jersey 
I Mills Home 
I Reeds 



PREACHER 



J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J. K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 
C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 
W. A. Smith 
Geo. P. Harrill 
John R. Miller 
J. S. Farmer 
Dr. R. T. Vann 
M. L. Kesler 
S. D. Swaim 
O. A. Keller 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
M. L. Kesler 

G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
T. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler 
R. E. White 

J. S. Hardawav 
M. L. Kesler 
W. A. Houg-h 
W. L. Barrs 
C. H. Trueblood 
C. A. Owens 
E. N. Gardner 

H. T. Penry 
M. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 
M. L. Kesler 

M. O. Alexander 
G. A. Martin 
E. F. Mumford 
W. L. Warfford 
E. C. Roach 
J. A. Neilson 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
O. A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
R. D. Coving-ton 
R. D. Coving-ton 



CLERK 



Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
fl--. S. Vann 
P. S. Yann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 



1 Now Hig-h Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 

4 Now Clemmonsville ; 5 Now Wallburg- 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE W. M. U. OF THE LIBERTY 
ASSOCIATION 



The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Association held its thirtieth 
annual session with the First Baptist church, Lexington, April 29, 1936. Superin- 
tendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, called the meeting to order at 10 o'clock and 
the congregation joined in singing "Come Women Wide Proclaim." Immediately 
following the song the watchword for the yeai' was repeated in unison. The theme 
of the program for the day was "Sent to Serve." 

The morning devotional was led by Rev. L. S. Gaines, pastor of the Lexington 
church, who used for his subject, "Dignity of Service," based on Luke 22:22-27 
and closed with prayer. The thought of service was further brought out in a duet 
sung by members of the Lexington choir. Mrs. E. E. Morgan, president of the 
hostess society, introduced Mrs. L. S. Gaines who gave the Union a very hearty 
welcome. Response was made by Mrs. W. A. Shoaf, president of the society at 
New Friendship. Visitors recognized were Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, President of the 



25 



MINUTES OF THE 



W. M. U. of North Carolina; Mrs. Edna R. Harris, State Corresponding Secretary; 
and Mrs. D. F. Stamps, missionary to China. Mrs. L. J. Matthews and Mrs. W. K. 
McGee were welcomed as new members in the association. 
Reports of service: 

Personal Service 

Number of societies doing personal work last year were 33— in 13 churches. 
Number this year 43— in 14 churches. An increase of ' 10 societies— 1 church. 
Number of societies doing personal service: W. M. S. 14, Y. W. A. 9, G. A. 8, R. A. 
6, Sunbeams 6. Kinds of service being done are visits, cards, trays and flowers 
to shutins; services held with shutins in hospitals and jails; gifts to needy per- 
sons, objects and institutions; work among negroes and in negro churches; gifts 
to Mills Home and the Hospital at Winston- Salem. 

MRS. A. F. WARFFORD, 

Personal Service Chairman 
Mission Study 

No. classes held— W. M. S. 18, Y. W. A. 4, G. A. 3, R. A. 3, S. B. 4. 
No. members enrolled in societies— W. M. S. 326, Y. W. A. 48, G. A. 97, R. A. 
66, S. B. 128. 

No. members enrolled in classes— W. M. S. 240, Y. W. A. 29, G. A. 97, R. A. 69, 
S. B. 102. 

No. W. M. S. Record Cards— No. 1 19, No. 2 2, Honor Certificates 1. 

No. W. M. S. silver seals 183, gold 23, red 2. 

No. W. M. S. reading cards 41, stamps 53. 

No. Certificates^Y. W. A. 27, G. A. 97, R. A. 28, S. B. 45. 

No. Seals— Y. W. A. gold 42, red 3, G. A. green 111, red 2, R. A. blue 38, red 3> 
S. B. gold 36, red 17, blue 7. 
No. books studied 21. 

Work of chairman: Cards sent 16, letters sent 6, taught one Mission Study 
Class, held one Mission Study Conference. 

MRS. W. J. GRIFFIN, 

Mission Study Chairman 
Having become a member of another association, Mrs. Griffin offers her 
resignation. 

WORK WITH YOUNG PEOPLE 

Elected young people's leader April, 1935. Paid visit to Superintendent and 
discussed work with her. Also got list of all W. M. U. organizations and sent 
Stewardship Literature to societies in six churches. However, the infantile pa- 
ralysis not only put a stop to the Stewardship Contest but hindered all the young 
people's work very seriously. The contest was held late, with a few churches tak- 
ing part and the leader carried three children to the contest at Salisbury. 

Some societies were visited and a Y. W. A. was org.anized at Churchland. The 
New Friendship Y. W. A. accompanied the leader and gave a program. 

Sent out 25 cards, 16 letters and traveled 64 miles. 

OLA CROWDER, 

Junior Superintendent 

Miss Crowder being absent. Miss McCracken read the report. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 



On hand January 1, 1935 $13.95 

Collected during year 20.50 

Total $34.45 

Disbursements 

To Mrs. J. B. Hipps, traveling expense $7.50 

To Miss Sallie McCracken for programs 2.00 

For postage 5.00 

For expense 8.00 

To Mrs. P. S. Vann for Charlotte Div 2.00 

Tax on checks 06 

Total $24.56 

Balance $ 9.89 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



26 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

We are now holding the thirtieth annual session of the W. M. U. of the Liberty 
Association. This year finds us with more A-1 societies than we have ever had 
before: 4 W. M. S.; 1 Y. W. A.; 5 G. A.; 5 R. A.; and 2 S. B. New Friendship 
maintains its standard as the only full graded A-1 union in the association. 

Our quota of $5,313.16 was reached, ai;d a little beyond, the contributions for 
the year amounting to $5,471.10. Societies and associations having raised their 
full quota are asked to make a 2 per cent increase this year. This makes our 
&,pporticnment for the Liberty $5,580.52. 

We still have organizations in only 16 churches out of the 26. This leaves 
too many churches unorganized. 

As our gifts are not itemized when recorded in the minutes, I am giving you 
a partial list of contributions for 1935: 



Cooperative Program $3,106.44 

Christmas Offering 473.81 

Home Mission Offering 226.01 

State Missions 127.62 

Orphanage 571.43 

H. T. Club 309.00 

Heck Memorial 75.98 

Hospital 212.47 

Margaret Fund 46.37 

Training School 45.15 



There are several smaller items not mentioned among them — $65.80 sent to the 
Negrins in Cuba for their work at Cruces. This is credited to Home Missions and 
helps to furnish S. S. literature and Missionary literature for the work of Mr. 
and Mrs. Negrin. 

Every society reported for the first quarter of this year, on time. It is hoped 
this record can be kept up through the year. 

Responsibility and joy of stewardship seem to be more keenly felt among our 
people than ever before and the Stewardship Contests each year perhaps have a 
large part in stimulating this interest. 

Meetings attended during the year: Foreign Mission Week at Ridgecrest; 
Charlotte Division meeting at Winston-Salem; Liberty Association at Mills Home; 
State Convention at Asheville. Letters and cards sent out, 160. Miles traveled, 545. 

SALLIE L. MCCRACKEN, 
Superintendent 

Following the reports. Rev. L. S. Gaines brought a spiritual message in song. 
With the roll call of churches a large number of delegates and representatives 
were recognized. All of the societies except three were represented. The brief 
words given by the presidents were very encouraging. Recognition was given the 
A-1 Union of New Friendship. 

Service through Margaret Fund was very ably discussed by Mrs. J. Clyde Tur- 
ner. The congregation stood and sang, "Lead On, O King Eternal." Mrs. Edna 
R. Harris spoke on General Work of the W. M. U. This address was full of in- 
formation and inspiration. A special feature at this time was an anthem sung 
by the Lexington choir. After announcements and appointment of committees 
the assembly adjourned for lunch. 

Immediately after lunch Mrs. Harris conducted a round table discussion of 
making reports and of the stewardship contest. 

The congregation reassembled promptly at 2 o'clock and sang "The Kingdom 
Is Coming." Mrs. I. P. Frazier conducted the devotional for the afternoon. Her 
subject was "Service though in Captivity." Mrs. J. A. Neilson led in prayer. The 
Missionary address for the day was given by Mrs. D. F. Stamps, of China. With 
this message we were led to catch a vision of the lost multitudes in China. Sun- 
beam Fiftieth Anniversary was discussed by Mrs. R. G. Jennings, of Thomasviile, 
and the subject was further emphasized by a program given by the Lexington 
Sunbeam Band led by Mrs. R. W. Martin. 

Reports of committees: 

Time and Place 

The committee which was composed of Mrs. J. K. Hankins, Mrs. R. L. Palmer 



27 



MINUTES OF THE 



and Mrs. Alda Graver recommend Southmont as the place of meeting and the 
time the last week in April, the day to be set later. 

Obituaries 

The committee which was composed of Mrs. B. R. Cross, Mrs. Jessie Yar- 
borough and Mrs. Lacy Hepler have received the names of three of our members 
who have passed away since we last met. They are: Mrs. W. H. Johnson, presi- 
dent of HoUoways W. M. S.; Mrs. J. H. Shytle, Erlanger; Mrs. Minnie Sink, Lex- 
ington. In memory of these dear ones the congregation stood and sang "It Is 
Well With My Soul." 

Courtesy 

We wish to express our thanks to our Superintendent and the officers asso- 
ciciated with her for the splendid program they have given us. For the presence 
of Mrs. Edna R. Harris, our Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, new 
President of our N. C. Union, and Mrs. Stamps, our representative to China, and 
the inspiring messages they have brought us, we are deeply grateful. 

We appreciate the interest manifested in the work of our union by so many 
of the pastors of the association as shown by their presence and cooperation. 

We were impressed by the spirit of the Lexington church as we entered this 
morning and we assure you we have felt at home throughout the day. We thank 
you for the gracious welcome and all the favors we have enjoyed today including 
the delicious lunch. We thank you also for the clever Sunbeam demonstration. 
The beauty of your flowers and the spiritual messages brought by your singers 
have been an inspiration to us. The fellowship of this day will linger long in our 
hearts. 

This committee was composed of Mrs. I. G. Greer, Mrs. G. C. Palmer, Mrs. 
L. J. Matthews and Mrs. J. C. Brewer. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

The Nominating Committee which was composed of Miss Roxie Sheets, Mrs. 
R. O. Hedrick, Mrs. L. E. Teague, Mrs. J. C. Poole and Mrs. C. F. Motsinger sub- 
mit the following names : 

Superintendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Superintendent, Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N, C. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, Rt. 4, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Mission Study Chairman, Mrs. V. R. Parker, Lexington, N. C. 

Personal Service Chairman, Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Rt. 6, Lexington, N. C. 

Young People's Leader, Miss Ola Crowder, Rt. 5, Winston- Salem, N. C. 

Margaret Fund Chairman, Mrs. Alda Craver, Rt. 3, Lexington, N. C. 

The vote was taken by Miss Roxie Sheets and the election was unanimous. 

Rev, W. K. McGee gave the closing devotional. His subject was "The Joy of 
Service." Dismissed with prayer by Mr. McGee. 

MRS. MASKEY M. SMITH, 
Secretary 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 
Pastors 



Name Address Church Member of 

Andrews, E. N. C, Thomasville, N. C Rich Fork 

Barringer, C. D., Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 2 Smith Grove 

Bowman, J. N., Erlanger, N. C Tabernacle 

Bradley, E. L., Spencer, N. C Churchland 

Carroll, Vann, Denton, N. C Denton 

Cox, J. A., Central Falls, N. C Carolina Avenue 

Darnell, W. C, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 Summerville 

Eddinger, Clyde, Welcome, N. O Welcome 

Gaines, L. S., Lexington, N. C Lexington 

Hopkins, W. B., China Grove, N. C Walters Grove 

Hunt, Howard, Denton, N. C Pleasant Plains 

McGee, W. K., Thomasville, N. C Thomasville 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



28 



Matthews, L. J., Wallburg, N. C Wallburg 

Mumford, E. F., High Point, N. C, Rt. 1 Abbotts Creek 

Neilson, J. A., Thomasville, N. C Mills Home 

Penry, H. T., Southmont, N. C Stoners Grove 

Pickler, J. M., Albemarle, N. C Taylors Grove 

Roach, E. C, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 Reeds 

Warfford, Walter L., Lexington, N. C, Box 122 Sheets Memorial 

ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE ASSOCIATION 
WHO ARE NOT PASTORS 
Name Church Member of Address 

Bishop, S. (Retired) Tabernacle (Erlanger Lexington, N. C, Rt. 4 

Caldwell, R. N. (Retired) Taylors Grove New London, N. C, Rt. 2 

King, J. M. (Retired) New Friendship Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

Gallimore, Arthur (Missionary) Lexington, N. C Canton, China 

McMillan, J. A. (Editor Charity & Children) Mills Home Thomasville, N. C. 

Newton, J. D. (Retired) Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

ASSISTANT PASTORS AND EDUCATION DIRECTORS 
None 

B. T. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Office Name Address 

Pastor — Rev. Louis S. Gaines Lexington, N. C. 

Director — ^G. G. Pridgen Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Director — Mrs. C. M. Howell Thomasville, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Miss Wilma Bray Thomasville, N. C. 

Assistant Sec.-Treas. — W. E. Oglesby Thomasville, N. C. 

Choister— L. W. Hansell Thom.asville, N. C. 

Pianist — Mrs. Tolbert L. Stroud Lexington, N. C. 

Adult Leader— S. A. Allred Lin wood, N. C, R|. 1 

Senior Leader — Talford Maley Thomasville, N. C. 

Intermediate Leader — L. W. Weller Lexington, N. C. 

Junior Leader — Mrs. John Brewer Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Publicity Director — ^^Tolbert I. Stroud Lexington, N. C. 

Group Director Group Address 

Alvery Kesler — Lexington (Group 1) Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5 

Wilfred R. Eddinger — ^Thomasville (Group 2) Thomasville, Rt. 1 

T. B. Marlin— Denton (Group 3) Erlanger, N. C. 

LOCAL B. T. U. PRESIDENTS, LEADERS AND DIRECTORS 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Pres. Sr. Union, Jennings Smith; Leader Int. Union, 
Geo. Poole; Leader Jr. Union, Floyd Tysinger, Thomasville, N. C. 

CENTER HILL— Pres. Sr. Union, D. C. Hunt, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

CHURCHLAND— Director, S. A. Allred, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1; Pres. B. A. U., 

B. F. Duncum, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5; Pres. Sr. Union, Jack Barnes, Linwood, N. 

C, Rt. 1; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. C. R. Darr, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5; Leader Jr. 
Union, Mrs. John Brewer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5. 

DENTON— Director, Miss Mary G. Smith, Jackson Hill, N. C; Pres. B. A. U., 
Mrs. Arthur Gallimore, Denton, N. C; Pres. Sr. Union, Miss Rosa Lee Carroll, 
Denton, N. C; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. C. E. Clyatt. 

JERSEY— Pres. Sr. Union, Miss Sadie Sharp, Linwood, N. C. 

LEXINGTON— Director Talbert Stroud, Lexington, N. C; Pres. B. A. U., Mrs. 
A. B. Misenheimer, Lexington, N. C; Pres. Sr. Union, Fred Golightly, Lexington, 
N, C; Leader Int. Union, W. E. Leonard; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. Emery Lanning. 

LIBERTY — Director, B. J. May, Jr., Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2; Pres. B. A. U., 
L. V. Miller, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2; Pres. Sr. Union, Miss Mabel Hepler. 
Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2; Leader Int. Union, Roy Watford, Thomasville, N. C. 

MILLS HOME— Director, Rev. J. A. Neilson; Leader Sr. Union, Miss Mar- 
garet Joyner; Pres. Sr. Union, Ruth Shaver; Leader Int. Union No. 1, Miss Delia 
Stroupe; Leader Int. Union No. 2, Mr. Paul Gibson; Leader Int. Union No. 3, Mrs. 
Romulus Skaggs; Leader Int. Union No. 4, Miss Nell Joyner; Leader Jr. Union 
No. 1, Miss Edith Hayes; Leader Jr. Union No. 2, Miss Lydia Beavers; Leader Jr. 
Union No. 3, Miss Ethel Johnson; Leader Jr. Union No. 4, Mr. Paul Edinger, 
Thomasville, N. C. 

REEDS— Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. G. F. Koonts, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 



29 



MINUTES OP THE 



RICH FORK — Pres. Sr. Union, Zelma Clinard; Leader Int. Union, Mozelle 
Clinard; Leader Jr. Union, Hannah Clinard, Thomasville, N. C. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL — Director, Nora Gallimore; Pres. B. A. U., M. R. Frank; 
Pres. Sr. Union, Pauline Carrick; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. John A. Craven; Leader 
Jr. Union, Mrs. Johnnie Peters, Miss Mattie Bean, Lexington, N. C. 

SOUTHSIDE— Pres. B. A. U., Miss Paula Guinn, Thomasville, N. C. 

STONERS GROVE— Pres. B. A. U., Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, Southmont, N. C; 
Pres. Sr. Union, Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. C, "Rt. 6; Leader Int. Union, 
Miss Virginia Wrenn, Southmont, N. C; Leader Union, Maurice Wrenn, South- 
mont, N. C. 

TABERNACLE— (Elrlanger)— Director, T. B. Marlin; Pres. B. A. U., H. L. 
Banks; Pres. Sr. Union, Virginia Lou Hanes; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. E. C. Put- 
nam; Leader Jr. Union, W. H. Walker; Leader Story Hour, Frances Shy tie; Er- 
langer, N. C. 

WALLBURG — Director, Miss Etta Teague; Pres. Sr. Union, Ray Rothrock: 
Leader Int. Union, Mrs. J. W. Tuttle, Wallburg, N. C; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. C. 
I. Cook, Winston-Salem, N, C, Rt. 5. 

THOMASVILLE— Director, G. G. Pridgen; Pres. B. A. U., R. W. Hansel! ; 
Pres. Sr. Union, Miss Doris Clemmons; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. C. M. Howell and 
Mrs. S. R. Matthev/s; Leader Jr. Unions, Mrs. Rachel Jones, Mrs. Wade Hilliard, 
Miss Blanche Gant and Miss Ruby Walters, Thomasville, N. C. 

WELCOME— Pres. Sr. Union, Mrs. T. H. Mills. 

W. M. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Superintendent — Miss Sallie McCracken Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Superintendent— Mrs. R. S. Green Thomasville, N. C. 

Sec.-Treas. — Mrs. M. M. Smith Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 6 

Mission Study Chrm. — iMrs. V. R. Parker Lexington, N. C. 

Personal Service Chrm. — Mrs. A. F. Warfford Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

Junior Supt. — Miss Ola Crowder Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

LOCAL PRESIDENTS 

ABBOTTS CREEK— Miss Mattie E. Teague, Kernersville, N. C, Rt. 1. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. G. M. McCaskill, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. B. F. Duncum, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5. 

HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. B. R. Cross, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

JERSEY — Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. E. E. Morgan, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 1. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. B. J. May, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2. 

MILLS HOME— Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

REEDS— ^Mrs. Alda Crvaer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

RICH FORI&-Mrs. W. M. Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL — Mrs. J. W. Byers, Lexington, N. C. 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, Southmont, N. C. 

TABERNACLE (Erlanger)— Mrs. J. N. Bowman, Erlanger, N. C. 

WALLBURG— Miss Etta Teague, Wallburg, N. C. 

THOMASVILLE— Mrs. L. E. Teague, Thomasville, N. C. 

Y. W. A. COUNSELORS 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. J. C. Poole, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. John Brewer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5. 

DENTON— Mrs. R. A. Allen, Denton, N. C. 

HOLLOWAYS— iMiss Elva Crook, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. Carroll Wall, Lexington, N. C. 

MILLS HOME-^Miss Helen Rowell, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. George Nading, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. Broadus Smith, Lexington, N. C. 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

TABERNACLE (Erlanger)— Mrs. J. N. Bowman, Erlanger, N. C. 

THOMASVILLE— Mrs. Mary Brewer, Thomasville, N. C. 

WALLBURG— Mrs. C. V. Teague, Wallburg, N. C. 

G. A. LEADERS 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. H. O. Walser, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



30 



HOLLO WAYS— Ida Beanblossom, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. A. A. Team, Lexington, N. C. 

MILLS HOME— Mrs. Margaret Joyner, Edith Hayes and Mrs. R. D. Coving- 
ton, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. Addie Pope, Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 
RICH FORK— ^Miss Zelma Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL — Mrs. Frank Everhart, Miss Mattie Bean, Lexington. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
TABERNACLE (Erlanger)— Helen McDade, Erlanger, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. L. G. Farmer, Miss Blanche Gant, Thomasville, N C. 
WALLBURG— Miss Stella Cook, Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

R. A. LEADERS 
CHURCHLAND— Texie Sowers, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 
HOLLOWAYS— Donald Dickens, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. Fletcher Wall, Lexington, N. C. 

MILLS HOME— Rev. J. A. Neilson, Miss Allie Kelley, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Miss Jennet Kiger, Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL— Loyd Pass, Lexington, N. C. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, Southmont, N. C. 
TABERNACLE— Mrs. C. C. Church, Erlanger, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. S. R. Matthews, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBUURG— Miss Stella Cook, Wallburg, N. C. 

SUNBEAM LEADERS 
CHURCHLAND— Elaine Lomax, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 
JERSEY— Miss Elizabeth Smith, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. G. C. Palmer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. Walker Martin, Lexington, N. C. 
MILLS HOME — Mrs. E. Lee Fex, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. C. F. Motsinger, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 
RICH FORK^Hannah Eddinger, Tbomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. Tom Cooper, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. Raymond Monsees, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
TABERNACLE (Erlanger)— Mrs. Artie Lindsay, Erlanger, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG— Mrs. Wm. King, Wallburg, N. C. 
WELCOME— Mrs. T. H. Mills, Welcome, N. C. 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 
ABBOTTS CREEK— Mrs. D. S. Hayworth, High Point, N. C, Rt. 4. ; 
CHURCHLAND— H. Foy Beck, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5. 
HOLLOWAYS— G. C. Palmer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
MILLS HOME— Miss Eulalia Turner, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Robert Hartman, Winston- Salem. N. C, Rt. 4. 
LEXINGTON-^B. W. Bewley, Lexington, N. C. 

SMITH GROVE— Herman Grubb, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. '■■ 
SOUTHSIDE— John Creed, Thomasville, N. C. 
ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS OF LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

Associational Supt.— C. F. Motsinger Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

Associate Supt. — ^C. C. Wrenn Southmont, N. C. 

Associational Sec. — Wilford Eddinger Thomasville, N. C. 

Department Superintendents : 

Beginners — Miss Elizabeth Smith Linwood, N. C. 

Intermediate — Mrs. Romulus Skaggs Thomasville, N. C. 

Young People — Wilford Eddinger Thomasville, N, C. 

Adult— W. P. Westmoreland Thomasville, N. C. 

Extension — Henry Lomax Linwood, N. C. 



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NORTH CAROLINA 



0^ c^HndmdiA and ^ijftk 

H€LD WITH 

Linwdod, N. C. 

Meptem^ie^ 7tk cmd ^ik, f937 



TTie next Session will be held Tuesday and Wednesday 
ofteT the First Sunday in September, 1938, wi+h 
4^^e Denton Qhurch, Denton, N. C. 



INDEX 



Appointment of Committees 8 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 28 

Auxiliaries — Associational 3-28 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 3 

Church Clerks 34 

Church Treasurers 35 

Committees: Promotion Executive 3-19 

Finance 8 

On Nominations 8 

Program for 1938 19 

To Report 1938 Chairman 3 

On Digest of Church Letters— 1938 19 

On Time, Place and Preacher 19 

Standing 3 

Constitution and By-Laws 22 

Deceased Members 21 

Directories: Associational 3-27 

Election of Officers 12 

Church 32-33-34-35-36 

B. Y. P. U 28 

Ordained Ministers 27 

R. A. and G. A 29 

Sunbeams 30 

W. M. U : 29 

Milliard, Rev. J. M 11 

Historical Table 23 

Mesengers 4 

Order of Business 5 

Orphanage Representative 19 

Pastors of Association 27 

Pastors, New 4 

Proceedings, Associational 5 

Procedings of W. M. U. Annual Meeting 24 

Reports: Religious Literature 6 

Committee on Obituaries 20-21 

B. T. U 18 

Committee on Nominations 12-19 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 19 

Digest of Church Letters 9 

Education 11 

Foreign Missions 15 

Hospitals 11 

Home Missions 14 

Mills Home 6 

Ministerial Relief : 10 

Public Morals „ 17 

State Missions 13 

Sunday Schools 16 

Treasurer's 20 

W. M. U. Work 12 

Standing Resolutions 22 

Statistical Tables 32-33-34-35-36-37-38 

Sermon, Annual 8 

Special Collection 16 

Spring Session 19 

Sunday School Superintendents 33 

Visitors 4 

Vote of Thanks 20 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries and Officers 29 

W. M. U. Associational Annual Meeting 24 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 



DIRECTORY 



OFFICERS 

Moderator, R. D. Covington Thomasville, N. C. 

Vice Moderator, G. W. Miller Lexington, N. C. 

Clerk and Ti-ea^urer, Sam J. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL PROMOTION COMMITTEE 

Rev. Walter L. Warfford, Chairman Lexington, N. C. 

CHAIRMEN OF COIMMITTEES TO REPORT AT 1938 SESSION 

Baptist Hospitals E. F. Mumford, High Point, N. C. Rt. 1 

B. T. U Talbert Stroud, Lexington, N. C, 

Christian Education J. W. Bray, Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

Foreign Missions Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, Wallburg, N. C. 

Home Missions C. D. Barringer, Salisbury, N. C. Rt. 2 

Ministerial Relief Hoyle Love, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 3 

Mills Home E. C. Roach, Erlanger, N. C. 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement W. K. McGee, Thomasville, N. C. 

Religious Literature W. G. Darnell, Thomasville, N. C. 

State of Churches J. A. Neilson, Thomasville, N. C. 

State Missions H. M. Stroup, Denton, N. C. 

Sunday Schools Fied C. Wilson, Lexington, N. C. 

W. M. U Mrs. Fletcher Wall, Lexington, N. C. 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
B. T. U. 

Associational Meetings were held with the church at Lexington, N. C, Januarj'' 
31, 1937; at Denton, N. C, March 31, 1937, and Jersey, May 30, 1937. 

Associational Director C. G. Pridgen, Thomasville, N. C. 

For other Officers see Church Directories, pages 28-29 

W. M. U. 

Annual Meeting was held with the Stoners Grove Church on April 23, 1937 

Associational Supt Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 

For Other Officers, see page 29 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 

Associational Meetings were held with the churches as follows: First Sunday in 
October, 1936, with First Church, Lexington, N. C; First Sunday in January, 1937, 
with Sheets Memorial Church, Lexington, N. C; First Sunday in April, 1937, with 
Wallburg Church, and First Sunday in July, 1937, at the Liberty Church. 

Associational Supt C. F. Motsinger, Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt. 5 

For Other Officers See Page 30 

BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE BOUNDS OF THE 
LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. Established in 1885. General Manager, 
Hon. I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C. Treasurer, R. D. Covington, Thomasville, 
N. C. Chairman Board of Trustees, B. W. Spillman, Kinston, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY, STANDING COMMITTEES, REPRESENTA- 
TIVES, AUXILIARY MEETINGS, ETC. 

Associational Missionary and other paid employees— None. 
Associational Laymen's Movement — None. 

Associational meetings of the W. M. U., B. T. U. and Sunday Schools are not 
held at the same time or during the sessions of the Annual Association. 



4 



MINUTES OF THE 



LIST OF MESSENGERS FOR THE 1937 SESSIONS 
(As listed on the Church Lettei-s) 
ABBOTTS CREEK— Rev. J. W. Bray, Miss Minnie Hayworth, Grady Green, 
Charlie Bodenheimer. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. B. L. Bostic, Mrs. Geo. McKaskill, Miss Pauline 
Carter, Miss Vivian Lowder, Mrs. Sadie Fuller. 

CENTER HILL— W. J. Beck, H. L. Miller, Mrs. Ray Owen, Mrs. C. A. Owen. 
CHURCHLAND— Mrs. B. F. Duncum, W. Hence Beck, L. E. Rickard, S. A. All- 
red. 

DENTON— Rev. H. M. Stroup, Dr. C. E. Clyatt, Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Mrs. R. A. 
Allen, A. L. Snider. 

ERLANGER— Mrs. B. L. Hames, Mrs. E. C. Roach, I. L. Blaylock, Mrs. E. C. 
Putnam, Mrs. Clara Barnes, E. C. HayneS. 

HOLLOWAYS— D. R. Beanblossom, Ray Crook and Ed Shirley. 

JERSEY— W. C. Roach, S. A. Sharpe, R. L. Palmer, J. T. Barnes, J. N. Pen- 
ninger, D. R. Smith. 

LEXINGTON— C. M. Wall, Rev. and Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Mrs. C. R. Sharpe, 
H. C. Myers, Sam J. Smith, G. W. Miller, B. F. Lee, S. H. Cross. 

LIBERTY — Mrs. L. E. Hepler, Mrs. N. F. Hooker, Miss Mabel Hepler, Mrs. Zula 
Clodfelter, L. E. Hepler, Mr. and Mrs. L. V. Miller. 

LICK CREEK— Miss Ruth E. Cole, Mrs. M. W. Davis, Mrs. A. W. Feezor. 

MILLS HOME— H. G. Early, W. P. Eddinger, Miss Esther Ward, Miss Eulalia 
Turner, 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— E. L. Snider, Erastus Swaim, Mrs. S. O. Hinkle. 
PLEASANT PLAINS— John Henry Garner, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Hughes, Fate 
Loftin, Carl Bean, R. J. Williams. 

REEDS— J. F. Foster, J. W. Myers, Mrs. Alda Craver. 

RICH FORK— Wilifred Eddinger, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Small, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Clinard, Mrs. Sally Orender, Miss Mozelle Clinard, Mrs. Dave Clinard. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. Walter L. Warfford, Mrs. Rose Frady, Miss Vergie 
Gallimore, Mrs. Jesse Gallimore, C. B. Stroud, Miss Leona Peacock. 

SMITH GROVE— I. E. Lassiter, Mrs. Thelma Clement, Mrs. Mary Clement, 
Walter Orrell. 

STONERS GROVE— I. A. Smith, L. E. Lookabill, F. J. Wrenn. 
SUMMERVILLE— Carlie Carrick, Mrs. Will Davis, Mrs. Nina Daniel, Mrs. Olin 
Davis. 

TAYLORS GROVE— 

WALLBURG— J. H. Yokley, G. W. Wall, Mrs. H. F. Pardue. 
WALTERS GROVE— W. E. Oglesby, E. R. Klass, J. A. Gallimore. 
WELCOME— M. L. Craver, W. S. Disher, Mrs. C. S. Haynes, Mrs. W. S. Disher. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. R. G. Green, Mrs. L. M. Howell, L. A. Bruton, Rev. J. 
D. Newton, L. E. Teague. 

NEW PASTORS IN THE ASSOCIATION 

Rev. J. W. Bray, pastor of Abbotts Creek, Pleasant Garden, N. C. 
Rev. Hoyle Love, pastor of Reeds, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 3. 

Rev. H. M. Stroup, pastor at Denton, Stoners Grove and Holloways, Denton, 
N. C. 

VISITORS RECOGNIZED 

Rev. and Mrs. J. Louis Price, pastor First Baptist Church, Siltr City, N. C. 
Rev. J. A. McKaughan, Winston- Salem, N. C, representing the United Dry 
Forces. 

Smith Hagaman, Winston-Salem, N. C, Superintendent Baptist Hospital. 
T. M. Hendrix, Mocksville, N. C, of the South Yadkin Association. 
E. N. Turner, Mocksville, N. C, of South Yadkin Association. 
Gerald K. Ford, Asheboro, N. C, Director of Christian Education First M. E. 
Church, Asheboro, N. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jno. F. Jarrett, Mocksville, N. C, of South Yadkin Association. 
R. F. Terrell, Raleigh, N. C, representative for Biblical Recorder. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Held with the church at 
CHURCHLAND 

LEXINGTON, N. C, R. F. D. 5 



FIRST DAY 
Tuesday, September 7, 1937 

1. The One Hundred and Fifth Annual Session of the Liberty Baptist Associa- 
tion convened with the chiu-ch at Churchland, Linwood. N. C, R. F. D. 1, Tues- 
day, September 7, 1937, at 9:35 A. M. 

2. The devotional of the Opening Session v\-as led by Rev. Hoyle Love, pastor 
of the Reeds church. 

3. The Association was called to order for the transaction of business by R. 
D. Covington, the Moderator. 

4. The Roll of the Churches was made at this time. A large delegation from 
most all the churches responded to the roll call. 

5. Sam J. Smith read the Report of the Program Cormnittee, which was 
adopted, as follov\'s: 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Churchland Baptist Church, Route 1, Linwood, N. C, September 7-8, 1937 
9:45 Praise and Worship 

10:00 Roil Call. Report of Pi'ogram Committee 

10:10 Religious Literature Mrs. Alda Craver 

10:30 MiUs Home : G. W. Miller 

11:15 Recognition of visitors, new pastors, appointment of cormnittees 

11:30 Sermon Rev. W. K. McGee 

12:15 Lunch ♦ 
1:30 Praise and Worship 

1:45 State of Churches Rev. W. L. Warfford 

1. Digest of Church Letters (Blackboard) 

2. Associational Goals for 1937 (Blackboard) 
2:30 Cooperative Program: 

1. Ministerial Relief L. E. Teagiie 

2. Baptist Hospital C. C. Wrenn 

3. Christian Education J. A. McMillan 

3:00 Address Dr. Hoyt Blackwell 

SECOND DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship 
10:00 Election of Officers and Business 

10:15 Woman's Missionary Union Miss Sallie McCracken 

10:45 Cooperative Pi'ogram: 

1. State Missions D. S. Hayworth 

2. Home Missions Rev. L. J. Matthews 

3. Foreign Missions Rev. J. A. Neilson 

11:15 Missionary Address Rev. Harold Shaly 

11:45 Address Rev. Peny Crouch 

12:30 Lunch 

1:30 Praise and Worship 



6 



MINUTES OF THE 



1:45 Temperance and Public Morals 

2:15 Sunday Schools 

2:40 Baptist Training Union 

3:00 Reports of Committees, etc. 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

6. The Report on Religious Literature was read by Mrs. Alda Graver. Upon 
motion to adopt, the report was discussion by R. F. Terrell, representative of the 
Biblical Recorder, Raleigh, N. C. 

Religious Literature 

In representing the report on religious literature we give the Bible first place. 
To the ministers, Sunday school teachers and heads of families we recommend 
that they study it and teach it more diligently. 

Children naturally take to the stories of the Bible and Jesus, but, compara- 
tively few children and youth have a definite knowledge of it. It is no fault of 
theirs that their elders neglect this most important Book. "And thou shalt teach 
them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in 
thine house and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and 
when thou risest up." Deut. 6:7. 

The Biblical Recorder is the organ of the Baptist State Convention to inform 
us about the work in our state. We must read the Recorder to be a well informed 
Baptist. Mr. Farmer, the editor, says the net gain in subscriptions for 1936 was 
3,324 and that it was the best year in many. 

More of our people are reading Charity and Children, too. This periodical is 
due a large part of the credit for the widespread interest in the Mills Home. 
Charity and Children is loyal to every phase of our denominational work. 

We are sorry to report that Home and Foreign Fields is soon to be discontinu- 
ed. 

Royal Service, successor to our Mission Fields, is the official organ of Woman's 
Missionary Union. Its very name is inspiring. Each month it contains a wealth 
of worthwhile material. This magazine increased its subscriptions more than 5,000 
from January 1 to July 31 in 1937. 

World Comrade, "gii'dling the world with friendliness," and The Window of 
Y. W. A. world vision calling our young womanhood to world service are our re- 
ligious periodicals for our young people. We siiould familiarize ourselves with 
them. These W. M. U. periodicals are published in Birmingham, Ala. 

In addition to the above mentioned periodicals there are many others con- 
cerned with our Baptist work which can be had from our Sunday school board in 
Nashville, Tenn., and from our Baptist Book Stcwe in Raleigh. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. ALDA CRAVER 

THE MILLS HOME 

7. The Report on Mills Home was brought by G. W. Miller. Upon motion to 
adopt, the report was discussed by G. W. Miller, I. G. Greer, Superintendent of 
the Home, and is adopted. 

REPORT OF BAPTIST ORPHANAGE WORK IN NORTH CAROLINA 

"Baptists have always been pioneers." "It is an interesting fact that Baptist-s 
were leaders in providing homes for dependent children daring the days of the 
Civil War." Perhaps the greatest contribution Baptists have made on the pages 
of history in the State of North Carolina was the founding of the Orphanage in 
the year of 1885. Just as the Bethlehem star led the shepherds and the wise men 
to the manger, just so has this same star ever stood over this institution and in- 
spired those to whose care it has been intrusted, and has always led in the selec- 
tion of those who shall direct its affairs. This Home has always been a reflector 
of light. As this heavenly light shone upon this home and the children gathered 
here by the Baptist people of the state, just so this same light has been reflectea 
back into the lives of those who made all this possible. A few of those gleams have 
penetrated into the Churches and Sunday Schools. Perhaps they have created 



.Rev. E. L. Bradley 

B. J. May 

G. G. Pridgen 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



some heat and light there. There has been a continuous stream of Ught radiating 
through the columns of Charity and Children all over the South and the world. 

Now, there is another beam more bright and dazzling than the others. The 
missionaries who have gone out to the home and foreign fields, who were sparks 
ignited by this institution. The orphanage has not been a liability to the Baptist 
denomination. It is rather an asset. It has trained and educated over 5,000 boys 
and girls and sent them out into the world as Christian citizens. "A city built 
on a hill cannot be hid." Surely this institution has with varied degrees of dili- 
gence sought to let her light shine unto the uttermost parts of the earth. In- 
trepid souls like Mills, Boone and Kesler have lifted the torch high, and hundreds 
of children have been born into His Kingdom and have been added unto the 
church, by the Lord Jesus. These are the fruits of their labors. "'By their fruits 
ye shall know them." These children have gone out into the world and some of 
them are preaching and teaching the unsearchable riches of Christ and His heal- 
ing touch. Yes, it is an asset. 

There are now hundreds of children in families which depend on government 
emergency relief. Many have to look to some form of government for their daily 
bread. What will be the future of these children if they are not educated and 
trained? If they are not well provided for they could do infinite harm. It is a 
pitiful thing to think of all of those hundreds of little children whose daily bread 
depends upon the generosity of the people. They must not be permitted to go 
hungry nor to lack the proper training. If we fail at this point, we have failed 
at the very center — the vital point. The test of religion is its attitude toward help- 
less children, the aged, and infirm and a concern for lost souls. Jesus said, "In- 
asmuch as ye did it unto one of the least of these, ye did it unto me."' The beg- 
gar is under obligation to share his last crumb of bread vAth his hungry com- 
panion. The wounded soldier lying on the battlefield must share the last drop 
of water from his canteen with his comrade dying by his side. Jesus said, "It is 
more blessed to give than to receive." The Baptists of the State for fifty years 
have looked with pride upon this lighthouse as it has sent its beams of light out 
into the dark corners of the earth and yet there comes urgent appeals for relief 
from mothers who cannot be answered. 

But if there is one thing in all the world that can unite the hearts of people, 
touched by the Spirit of God, it is that which directs our attention to, and enlists 
our efforts in behalf of dependent children. 

The Baptists of North Carolina, and of the Liberty Association have good rea- 
son today for joy and satisfaction with the condition of our Orphanage. The 
sunshine of our Father's favor is upon it, and the good will of the people is evi- 
dently toward it. The interests of the children were never better cared for, and 
the health and happiness of the children are manifest to all who visit those homes. 

This does not mean, however, that we have reached the goal. Doubtless the 
superintendent and the trustees have larger and better ideas in their minds, and 
may I here suggest that there should be- at this time, or in the near future, a 
church building erected at the Mills Home in keeping with the demands. There 
is also the need of at least three new buildings. There should be memorials to 
the three general mana-gers and should be financed by the Baptists of the State. 
We are grateful for the men and women who founded the Orphanage and man- 
aged it in the past. Their names are part of the imperishable history of the Bap- 
tist denomination of the State of. North Carolina, and their images are engraved 
in many hearts and lives. We are also grateful to those who have given to make 
the work of this institution possible. Some gave richly out of their poverty, and 
others gave out of their abimdance with which God blessed them. 

The Apostle James said, "True and undefiled religion before God and the 
Father is this, to visit the widow and orphan in their affliction and keep himself 
unspotted from the world." 

WHAT WOULD JESUS SAY? 

"1 can but wonder — should the Master come 
As once he came and stood beside the sea. 
Whereon his servants grimly toiled in vain — 
With what undreamed di\ane simplicity 
Of words he would us greet. 



8 



MINUTES OF THE 



Surely not this again; 
Children, have ye any meat? 

And yet, I know not. His ways are not ours. 
Well may it be that he will ask 
Of our own needs, though we ourselves forget, 
Serving the world — ^or striving at the task. 

Not strange the question sweet 

Above our toil and fret: 
Children, have ye any meat? 

And then, that 'Come and dine'— Himself the host! 
How starved we were, we'd know; how hard bestead; 
How bare of ought to give!— What boots the will 
If in our hands is nothing — fish or bread? 
How may we bid men eat? 
Ye who are fain to fill 
The sad world's hunger— have ye any meat?" 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. W. MILLER 

ANNUAL SERMON 

8. The Annual Sermon was preached by Rev. W. K. McGee, pastor of the 
Thomasville church. His scripture readings were from Zachariah 4th chapter, 
Luke 24th chapter and Acts 2nd to 4th chapters. His subject was "The Power for 
Our Program." His text being from Zachariah 4th chapter as follows: "Not by 
might, nor by power, but by My Spirit, said Jehovah of Hosts." 

Adjournment. 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

9. Rev. J. M. Hayes, a popular ex-pastor of the church at Lexington, con- 
ducted the devotional. 

10. At this time the Moderator announced the appointment of the following 
committees : 

COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE— L. E. Teague, B. J. May, W. C. Darnell, C. C. Wrenn, D. R. Bean- 
blossom. 

TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER— W. K. McGee, E. C. Roach, J. W. Bray, 
Hoyle Love, D. S. Hayworth. 

ON NOMINATIONS— W. L. Warfford, L. E. Hepler, G. W. Miller, I. G. Greer, 
Sam J. Smith. 

TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1938— Louis S. Gaines, E. F. Mumford, E. L. 
Bradley, L. J. Matthews, C. M. Wall. 

ON OBITUARIES^J. A. McMillan, H. M. Stroupe, Clyde Edinger, A. L. Sni- 
der, C. F. Motsinger. 

NEW PASTORS IN THE ASSOCIATION 

11. The new pastors were recognized at this time. For names see page 4. 

VISITORS 

12. Visitors were recognized at this time. See page 4. 

STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

13. The Digest of Church Letters and the Associational Goals for next year 
was brought at this time by Rev. Walter L. Warfford. He, from a large board, 
compared this year's gifts with last year's. The following written report was 
adopted: 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



REPORT ON STATE OF CHURCHES AND DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS 

The best index as to the State of the Churches is probably found in the sum- 
mary and analysis of the Church Letters themselves. You will therefore study 
carefully with me the following summary and analysis of our reports this year: 

First, a summary of enrollments for the past year: Last year we reported a 
membership of 6,674, while this year we report a membership of 6,640, or' a LOSS 
of 34 in membership. Last year we reported 336 baptisms; this year we report 284 
baptisms, or 52 LESS than last year. Last year our total additions reported was 
516; this year 436, or 80 LESS than last year. Last year we reported 976 enrolled 
in B. T. U., while this year we report an enrollment of 827, a LOSS in enrollment 
of 183. The W. M. U. had enrolled last year 1,482; this 1,418, a LOSS of 74. Last 
year we reported 6,327 enrolled in Sunday School, while this year we report 6,510, 
or a GAIN of 183 in Sunday School enrollment. The Sunday School is the only 
organiaation, including the church itself, that did not have a LOSS in enrollment 
during the year! 

Second, A summary of our financial reports: Last year we paid the Pastors 
of our churches $17,197.00; this year $17,914.00, an INCREASE of $717.00. We re- 
port this year having raised for total Local Church expenses $37,262.00; last year 
$42,498.00, or $5,236.00 LESS this year than last year. We report this year for 
Benevolences (exclusive of Orphanage) $12,355.00; last year $11,385.00, or an IN- 
CREASE of $970.00 over last year. For the Orphanage we report $4,509.00 this 
year; last year $4,135.00; or an INCREASE of $374.00 over last year. This year we 
report having raised for all purposes $54,127.00; last year $58,016.00, or $3,889.00 
LESS than last year for all purposes. Last year our per capita gifts averaged $8.57, 
while this year the per capita average is $8.01, or 56c LESS than last year. After 
taking off one-fourth of our total church membership, and figuring our offerings 
on an individual weekly basis, the average weekly gifts to benevolence was .04c. 
Less than the price of a Coca-Cola per week! For the Orphanage our per capita 
weekly gifts was 1 l-6c. For all purposes our per capita weekly gifts was 14c. Less 
than the price of a package of cigarettes per week! 

The following table represents the percentage division of our offerings with 
reference to local work and all benevolences. It also shows our goals for Coopera- 
tive Progi-am for net year, both as to weekly per capita offerings and total goal. 



Church 



Abbotts Creek 

Carolina Avenue 

Center Hill 

Churchland 

Denton 

Erlanger 

Holloways 

Jersey 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Lick Creek 

Mills Home 

New Friendship 

Pleasant Plains 

Reeds 

Rich Fork 

Sheets Memorial 

Smith Grove 

South Side 

Stoners Grove 

Summerville 

Taylors Grove 

Thomasville 



Percentag-e to All 
Local Work 

1936 1937 

60% 55% 

91% 97% 

71% 72% 

75% 64% 

79% 64% 

95% 90% 

75% 74% 

75% 69% 

60% 61% 

83% 81% 

94% 77% 

42% 42% 

60% 72% 

95% 86% 

76% 84% 

81% 78% 

90% 89% 

89% 91% 

92% 86% 

86% 84% 

94% 82% 

89% 88% 

81% 74% 



Percentage to All 
Benevolences 

1936 1937 

40% 45% 

09% 03% 

29% 28% 

25% 36% 

21% 36% 

05% 10% 

25% 26% 

25% 31% 

40% 39% 

17% 19% 

06% 23% 

58% 58% 

40% 28% 

05% 14% 

24% 16% 

19% 22% 

10% 11% 

11% 09% 

08% 14% 

14% 16% 

06% 12% 

11% 12% 

19% 26% 



Goals for 1938 
Individ! Total 

Weekly for 
Offering Year 



02c 


$ 300.00 


00 


00 


03c 


230.00 


05c 


607.00 


03c 


178.00 


03 c 


250.00 


01c 


150.00 


01c 


175.00 


15c 


5788.00 


02c 


156.00 


00 


00. 


10c 


2314.00 


10c 


967.00 


00 


00 


02c 


236.00 


03c 


312.00 


03c 


350.00 


02c 


82.00 


00 


00 


03c 


121.00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


10c 


2891.00 



10 



MINUTES OF THE 



23% 30% 00 00 

07% 14% 01 1/2 52.00 

15% 26% 03c 126.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER L. WARFFORD 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAM * 

14. The report on Ministerial Relief was read by L. E. Teague. 
The Report on Baptist Hospitals was read by C. C. Wrenn. 
The Report on Christian Education written by J. A. McMillan was read by 
Sam J. Smith. 

The reports were all adopted and discussed by L. E. Teague R. D. Covington, 
C. C. Wrenn, Smith Hagaman, superintendent of Baptist Hospital, Rev. W. K. 
McGee and Rev. Hoyt Blackwell, proefssor of Bible at Mars Hill College, and R. K. 
Williams. 

REPORT OF MINISTERIAL, RELIEF AND ANNUITIES 

The work of the Relief and Annuity Board of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion, located at Dallas, Tex., should find a large place in the thought and concern 
of every Baptist in the South. They should make it a matter of prayer, of study 
and of co-operative effort. 

The Clare of Our Aged and Infirm Preachers and Widows 

First, the Board continually faces the great task laid upon it by the Southern 
Baptist Convention and by the various States of providing food, clothing and shel- 
ter for thousands of ministers who have grown old in the service of Christ, and 
for the widows of those who have gone to their Heavenly home. The outstretched 
hands of these needy ones should make an appeal to the generosity of the people 
of our churches and one that should find quick and practical response. "Who 
would begrudge a few embers to keep the frost of winter from chilling the weary 
frames of these veterans of the Cross?" 

The "Fellowship Offering" 

The Relief and Annuity Board is now asking that a special "Fellowship Offer- 
ing" be taken by each church at least once a year in connection with the obser- 
vance of the Lord's Supper. This offering will be in addition to their regular con- 
tributions and should be sent to the Relief and Annuity Board through the State 
offices like all other contributions but marked "Special Fellowship Offering for 
Ministerial Relief." We would suggest to all of our churches in the Liberty Asso- 
ciation include this item in their budget as they set it up for the year. We know 
of no other object that should be emphasized more than this one. It thousands 
of our churches will take this "Fellowship Offering" the Relief and Annuity Board 
will be able to send thousands of dollars more money to these aged and dependent 
veterans. 

Building Against the Day of Need 

Second, the younger men now active in the ministry of Southern Baptist 
churches will, if they live, grow old, and unless something is done to prevent them 
from reaching old age in poverty they are well nigh certain to become dependents 
upon th€j churches or upon their communities. It is not enough to say that the 
children and grandchildren of aged ministers should or will take care of them. 
The simple truth is that most of them do not and many of them could not if they 
would; they have family cares of their own that usually make drafts upon them 
for all that they can do. Many children of ministers do help their parents and 
they often do itat a very great sacrifice, but be that as it may, is it not better 
for churches and ministers to co-operate in the payment of certain (not burden- 
some) dues by means of which age benefits may be built up through Relief and 
Annuity Board during the years of active service and drawn upon during the years 
of inactivity and retirement. These church dues may be limited to three per cent 
(3%) of the minister's monthly salary while the minister pays a like amount. No 
salary is too small to enable the churches and ministers to benefit by this plan. 

Respectfully submitted, 
L. E. TEAGUE 



Wallburg 

Walters Grove 
Welcome 



77% 70% 

93% 86% 

85% 74% 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



REPORT ON THE BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

To the Liberty Association in session at the Churchland Baptist Church in 
session September 7 and 8, 1937: 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospital, located in Winston -Salem, N. C, reports 
the best year in its history. The report for the year ending June 30, 1937, shows 
that 4,000 patients were treated and 1,000 turned away for lack of room. 

The nurses' home is now being enlarged to double its present capacity, and 
plans are also under way to enlarge the Hospital to provide room for those who 
are now being turned away. 

During the year 1,000 mothers were treated and returned home to their 3,000 
children, 4,000 patients returned home to their 20,000 fathers and mothers, brothers 
and sisters, and 200,000 interested kinsmen and friends. 

The hospital has a staff of five internes, sixty-six doctors, and fifty-five nurses. 
It is rendering a vast amount of free service to sick and distressed humanity. The 
value of this service is estimated to be $160,000 for the year. These patients come 
from practically every section of the state. 

The hospital depends largely on the Mother's Day offering for treatment for 
those who are unable to pay. This offering last year amounted to $20,000. This 
amount should be greatly increased. We, therefore, urge every church in this as- 
sociation to take an offering on Mother's Day, or some date near this date, and 
send it to the Baptist Hospital. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. C. WRENN 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

We deem it unnecessary to plead for education before any group of North 
Carolina citizens. North Carolina believes in education and is definitely com- 
mitted to the policy of educating all of her people. It is quite unnecessary to plead 
for Christian education before the Liberty Baptist Association. For many years 
while the need existed, the Baptists of this and the adjoining Piedmont Association 
maintained a Christian school at Wallburg that was a greater argument for 
Christian education than anyone could make with words. We content ourselves 
therefore with the mere naming of the colleges that are owned and controlled by 
the Baptists of North Carolina: Wake Forest College for more than a hundred 
years has been pouring into the life of the state a stream of men who ahve played 
a large part in building this state; Meredith College, our only senior college for 
women this yeai? is recognized as standard by every standardizing agency in 
America. While absolutely standard, Meredith is definitely Christian and Bap- 
tist; Chowan College, for 75 years the seat of culture of Eastern North Carolina, 
opens this fall as a junior college; Mars Hill College, one of the first junior col- 
leges in the south to satisfy every demand of every standardizing agency, opens 
today with a student body that taxes to the limit the splendid plant; Campbell 
College like Mars Hill has made a large place for years in the hearts of our peo- 
ple; Wingate Junior College and Boiling Springs Junior College are both our col- 
leges even though they are owned and controlled by smaller groups of Baptists 
while the other five are owned and controlled by all of the Baptists as represented 
by the Baptist State Convention. 

Submitted by, 

JOHN ARCH MCMILLAN 



THE SECOND DAY 

WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 

15. The devotional was conducted by Rev. H. M. Stroup, pastor of the Denton, 
Stoners Grove and Holloways churches. 

Rev. J. M. Hilliard 

16. At this time a special prayer was offered foi: Rev. J. M. Hilliard, a for- 
mer pastor in the Association, who is sick at his home in High Point, N. C. Rev. 
Hilliard had not missed a session of this association in many years. It was voted 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



that the clerk of the body send Bro. Hillard a note of sympathy. 

HISTORY OF CHURCHLAND CHURCH 

17 At this time a historical sketch of the Churchland church was read by 
R. K. Williams, a member of the church. This was done in celebration of the 
100th anniversary of the church. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS 

17(a). At this time the committee appointed by the Moderator to nominate of- 
ficers made their report, which was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1938 

We recommend to the Body the following for our officers for next year: 

For Moderator— R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C; For Vice Moderator— G. 
W. Miller, Lexington, N. C; For Clerk and Treasurer, Sam J. Smith, Lexington 
N.'c. 

Signed, 

L. S. GAINES, 
L. J. MATTHEWS, 
C. M. WALL, 
E. F. MUMFORD, 
Committe to Nominate Officer 
for 1938. 

W. M. U. REPORT 

18. At this time the report on W. M. U. activities in the Assaciation was 
read by Miss Sallie McCracken. Same was discussed by Miss McCracken and Sam 
J. Smith, Rev. W. L. Warfford and was adopted. 

REPORT ON W. M. U. WORK 

The work of the Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Association has kept 
a steady movement upwarc^ and onward as new recruits have been added and new 
enthusiasm and interest aroused by the helpful programs arranged for the year 
and by mission study. 

The annual meeting for 1937 was held with the Stoners Grove church in April, 
Reports for the year 1936 were very gratifying. The day's program was featured 
by discussions of the various phases of our work by a number of women of the 
association and the two guest speakers, Mr. and Mrs. Eph Whisenhunt, of Elkin. 
Mrs. Whisenhunt, who is a member of the Lawton family of China, brought the 
missionary message of the day, placing much stress on the prayer life of the mis- 
sionaries and their dependence on the prayers of their friends of the homela.nd. 
During the memorial service a fitting tribute was paid to Rev. H. T. Penry, the 
beloved pastor of the Stoners Grove church who had recently died. Mr. Penry 
will be greatly missed in the meetings of the W. M. U., for he was a faithful at- 
tendant and saw that members of his churches also attended, and never failed 
to give a word of encouragement and assurance of his hearty cooperation. 

The financial goal for the year was $5,580.52. We gave $6,704.09. This year 
we are working on a different plan from the one used for several years. Hereto- 
fore we have been asked by our State officers to give a certain per cent above the 
amount raised the previous year. This year we are asked to make a two per cent 
raise on the Cooperative Program and then give what we wish to the special of- 
ferings we have throughout the year. Our State W. M. U. is also sponsoring the 
Hundred Thousand Club this year and asking that every association and every so- 
ciety do its best for this cause. Of course, the W. M. U. of the Liberty Association 
is one of the pioneers in this for we have a few; members who helped to launch 
the campaign in Washington City in 1933. Our membership has grown from year 
to year and last year we contributed for this cause something over $400.00. 

The societies of Liberty W. M. U. along with the other associations in our Char- 
lotte Division are asked to make contributions, either in money or cash, to Library 
of Wingate Junior College in memory of Mrs. Lila L. Henry, for many years the 
leader of this division of our state work. I am happy to report that we have had 
a liberal response, some by giving money and others by donating books. New 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



Friendship is still our only full graded union. 

Next year the fiftieth anniversary of the Woman's Missionary Union of the 
Southern Baptist Convention will be celebrated in Richmond where the first 
meeting was held in 1888. There is no way by which the fruits of this organiza- 
tion can be estimated. The more than fifty millions of dollars that have been 
contributed would perhaps represent, a small part of the good that has been ac- 
complished. Much emphasis is placed on prayer, Bible and mission study, personal 
service, good literature, tithing and training of the young people. For the result.s 
of this we have only to look at our mission fields at home and abroad where we 
have laborers at work for the Master and many of them will bear testimony that 
they received their inspiration and desire for this kind of work in their Sunbeam, 
G. A., R. A., Y. W. A., or Woman's Missionary Society. 

Again we ask the help of the pastors in organizing the W. M. U. work in our 
churches that have no missionary societies and feel sure the work of the church 
will be advanced by such a step forward. 

SALLiE L. Mccracken 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

(Continued From Yesterday) 
19. The Report on State Missions was read by D. S. Hayworth. The Report 
on Home Missions was read by Rev. L. J. Matthews. The Report of Foreign Mis- 
sions was read by Rev. J. A. Neilson and the three reports were adopted. 

STATE MISSIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

The spirit and motive of Missions — Foreign, Home and State — are identical. 
It is difficult to understand why one should profess to believe in one and not in 
the other. The objectives, however, are slightly different. Within the State a 
distinction is made between Missions, Christian Education, and Benevolence — in- 
cluding the Orphanage and the Hospital — whereas Foreign Missions, and with 
some limitations Home Missions, includes all of these objects. What then is in- 
cluded under the head of "State Missions?" 

For a hundred years the objective of State Missions has been to win the peo- 
ple to Christ and then to the fellowship which the churches provide. When, how- 
ever, we use the word "Win" we do it with the distinct understanding that it is 
not the key word in the New Testament record. The key word there is "witness." 
We understand, then, that the method of winning people, whether as individuals 
or whether as churches cooperating one with another, is in witnessing to the re- 
deeming love and power of the Lord Jesus in the individual life and in all human 
relationships. This was, and is, the primary task of State Missions. During more 
recent years, notably during the past quarter of a century, the training and de- 
velopment of those who come into the churches has become an additional function 
of State Missions, so that from small beginnings the State Mission task now in- 
cludes many varied activities. Those we list and discuss briefly: 

1. Missionary Pastoral Assistance: "To the poor the gospel is preached" in 
many needy and strategic places. Many of our strong churches are trophies of 
State Missions. The fact is that hundreds of churches formerly aided by the 
Board are now returning to the treasury for all purposes one hundredfold. The 
task is not concluded, but merely begun. In many sections the majority of the 
pastors do not receive sufficient support from their churches to keep them fit for 
Kingdom service. Thia means that they must find work to do with their hands 
in order to support their families. The result is that about the only work they 
can do for their people is an occasional sermon. Visitation and training of the 
membership are almost unknown in widely scattered areas. There is spiritual 
hunger which is not being supplied. Th0 hungry sheep look up and are not fed 
because the pastors are busy with this, that, and the other in an attempt to sup- 
ply the physical needs of theiii families. In the early days attention was almost 
solely on evangelism. Now that our membership has grown so rapidly the chief 
emphasis should be the training and development of the membership, without, 
however, omitting evangelism. 

2. Church Building-.* All through the years, and even at the present time, 
churches in strategic centers are aided in building plants that are needed. 

3. Teaching: and Training: About 1900 State Missions generally assumed a 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



part of its enlarging task. Sunday School department were established as a part 
of the general work. The workers connected with this department, as time would 
permit, went out to the churches in an effort to secure and train better teachers 
and to put into operation methods of better Sunday School administration. At a 
later period the B. Y. P. U. — now the B. T. U. — was organized, emphasizing not 
so much the teaching but the training and development qf the membership. 

4. Indians: The State Mission Board is responsible for giving the Gospel to 
the Indians in Robeson County. Rev. and Mrs. M. C. Lunsford have been, work- 
ing there for several years. 

5. Negroes: The Baptist State Convention is now undertaking some coopera- 
tive work with the Negro State Convention. At one time it was necessary to provide 
white workers among the Negroes. In more recent times, however, increased edu- 
cational advantages have produced more competent leaders among them, and the 
plan now is to cooperate with them rather than to provide workers. The white 
Baptists have at their doors a tremendous opportunity in giving sympathy and 
financial support to Christian Education among the Negroes. Our Convention is 
aiding the Negroes in paying the salary of Rev. W. C. Somerville, who is achieving 
notable success in arousing and enlisting the quarter of a million Negro Baptists 
in the state. The Convention is also helping with the salary of Mr. Clanton, who 
has recently been engaged to do special Sunday School work. 

6. Work Among Students in the Colleges: The increase in students in in- 
stitutions, denominational and state, has been little short of marvelous in the past 
two decades. This means that during a large part of the year young' people from 
sixteen to twenty-five are disassociated with the home ties and the home church. 
We have only one full time student secretary, Miss Cleo Mitchell, who is located 
at Greensboro. However, church in other educational centers are aided in order 
that they may help to provide a more normal church life for the students while 
they are away from home and the home church, 

7. Oteen Hospital: For some years now our Board, together with some aid 
in recent years from other states, has made it possible for Rev. Wayne Williams 
to minister to the sick veterans in the Government Hospital at Oteen. 

8. General Missionaries: There are two, M. O. Alexander and J. C. Pipes. 
Mr. Pipes spends his full time in the western part of the state. Those men hold 
revivals, visit general meetings, aid churches in forming fields; answer all kinds 
of calls that come to them for assistance. Another man could be used in this 
work to great advantage. The state is too large to be covered by only two men. 

While the care of the orphans and the care of the sick in our Baptist Hos- 
pital may not be considered as a part of the work done under the head of State 
Missions; surely the impetus to establish orphanages and hospitals was given by 
State Missions. 

There is one task of State Missions, which, in reality, we have not yet under- 
taken: a ministry to the prison population. Surely at the earliest opportunity this 
work should become a definite part of our State Mission Program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. S. HAYWORTH 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS, 1937 

The hope of the world lies in the Christ who said, "And I, if I be lifted up 
from the earth, will draw all men unto me." Apart from the blood of Jesus there 
is no remission of sin. The ills of the human race have no place of healing ex- 
cept in the Great Physician. There is no knowledge that is sufficient apart from 
the Great Teacher. The only salvation the worl(5 has or needs or ever will have 
is in the crucified and risen Christ. 

The task of Home Missions is to lift) up Christ and make him Lord in the 
life of the homeland. It is not sufficient to know that a generation was evange- 
lized, but it is the obligation of the followers of Jesus to evangelize each genera- 
tion. 

In the work of bringing our homeland to Christ, we aro serving the world. 
"The light that shines fartherest, shines brightest at home." So, a victorious 
preaching of Christ in the home land is necessary if we are to have success afar. 
A faith that does not conquer at home cannot be victorious abroad. It is folly 
to attempt to send abroad that which we do not have at home. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



Through he efforts and work of the Home Mission Board, Christ is being lift- 
ed up in the homeland among the Indians, the foreigners, the Negroes, the under- 
privileged in the cities and congested industrial sections, and in Cuba and Panama. 
In all departments of work, including the field force, the Sanatorium, the rescue 
missions, the good-will centers, and schools, the board has 327 missionaries work- 
ing ini 850 mission stations. There has been added during the past year 35 new 
missionaries. 

On the fields of the South our missionaries opened 39 new stations last year, 
bringing the total of churches and stations to 640. The churches have a member- 
ship of 11,755; during the year 2,137 were added by baptism, and there were 3,633 
professions. 

Three new churches were organized in Cuba, where the board has 72 workers. 

A new department of the work is that of evangelism. Dr. Roland Q. Leavell 
is the capable and efficient superintendent. The purpose of the departmnet is, 
through evangelistic conferences, the circulation of literature, and simultaneous 
revival campaigns in strategic centers, to keep aflame the spirit of evangelism. 

A commendable accomplishment of the Home Mission Board is that it has 
adjusted its budget so as to operate on a cash basis. For the past three and one- 
half years no money has been borrowed for current work. 

If the Christian faith is ever to conquer the world the forces must be mar- 
shalled at home. Home Missions is not simply a matter of emotional concern or 
evangelistic zeal. It is an essential part of our world campaign for Christ. A 
saved Jerusalem holds the key to the saving of Judea and Samaria and the utter- 
most part of the 'earth. So, we must have for our mission of salvation in all lands 
the strength of a denomination saved by the Blood of the Lamb here at home. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. MATTHEWS 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Four short years ago, we reported a decrease in receipts for Foreign Missions. 
Cuts were being made here and there; the Foreign Mission budget was reduced by 
more than 50%; native work was cut almost in half; while approximately 30 mis- 
sionaries were left at home without definite salary. Receipts for Foreign Missions 
in our Southern Baptist Convention which once reached the high water mark of 
$2,272,197.96, fell as low as $600,630.94, while the debt on the Board amounted to 
$1,110,000. Reports then were pessimistic in tone, and dark in outlook. That was 
four years ago. Today, reports are optimistic, and the outlook bright. The debt 
has dropped from $1,110,000 to $367,500, while receipts have jumped from $600,630 
to $959,794, an increase of more than 50%. These receipts, together with the in- 
come from endowment funds, bequests, and miscellaneous sources, as well as the 
money 'received from sale of property and special gifts for debts, make a grand 
total of $1,040,574, so that for the first time in several years, our total income for 
Foreign Missions has passed the million mark. Ninety new missionaries have been 
appointed since January, 1933, and 28 re-appointed, making a total of 118 replace- 
ments. On April 1st of this year, there were 56 emeritus missionaries on pension, 
and 415 missionaries in the active service of the Board at work in sixteen different 
foreign countries. In these countries we have 1715 churches with a membership 
of a little over 200,000 and 960 of these churches are self-supporting. 

Another and significant fact is the amount contributed by the W. M. U. for 
the 1936 Lottie Moon Christmas Offering. The goal set by our noble women was 
$175,000. The amount received was $291,761.72, Out of this most generous offer- 
ing, $100,000 was set aside for the salaries of 125 missionaries, while the balance 
of $191,761,72 was used for the support of many phases of our foreign mission work 
such as W. M, U. work in foreign lands, Bible Training Schools, seminaries, hos- 
pitals, debts on institutions and churches, and the building of missionary homes. 
Once more the W. M, U, has bridged the gap, and enabled the Foreign Mission 
Board to go through the lean months without a deficit. 

But in the midst of these blessings, for which we are profoundly grateful, let 
us not settle down to self-complacency and self-satisfaction, for we have touched 
only the fringe of our possibilitiei^ and there is much yet to be done. No new mis- 
sionaries were appointed at the semi-annual meeting of the Board in April, and 
a long look into the future cannot justify any enlargement until the regular, sys- 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



tematic receipts through the Co-operative Program increases. For future growth. 
Southern Baptists must increase their regular weekly gifts to God for His work 
in foreign lands. To our shame let it be said that Southern Baptists gave to 
Foreign Missions last year less than 30c per capita for the year, while we of tho 
Liberty Association gave less than 50c per capita for the year. 

With the return of prosperity in the economic and business life of the South, 
there! has not been the corresponding recovery and increase in the gifts of our 
people to the great mission and benevolent causes included in the Co-operative 
Program. We must raise the standard of our giving if we are to meet the needs 
and supply the missionaries for the new and compelling opportunities open to us 
everywhere, both at home and abroad. Our primary need is to get right with 
God ourselves, and then to seek first His kingdom and His righteousness if all 
these are to b^ added unto us. We urge three things: First, sincere and heart- 
felt prayer for the great cause of missions; second, an earnest study of the work, 
the fields, and the needs of Foreign Missions, in schools of missions and in clases 
as well as individually; third, conscientious giving to the cause of missions in the 
spirit of real sacrifice. 

J. A. NEILSON 

MISSIONARY ADDRESSES 
By Rev. Harold Shaly 

20. At this time an address of high spirituality and interest was delivered by 
Rev. Harold Shaly, a native of Brazil,, who is at present a student at Wake Forest 
College. He brought tears to the audience when he told how he was made an 
outcast by family and friends when he confessed Christianity. 

Rev. Perry Crouch from the State Board, also at this time delivered an ad- 
dresse on Missions. 

SPECIAL OFFERING 

21. A special offering was taken Jor Rev. Harold Shaly. Amount collected, 
$19.15. 

Adjournment. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 
22 The devotional is conducted by Rev. T. M. Bray, pastor of the Abbotts 
Creek Church. 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

23. The Report on Sunday Schools was made by B. J. May. The report was 
discussed by B. J. May and by L. L. Morgan, State Secretary of Sunday Schools. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT, 11937 

The perennial battleground of the Christian religion is in the Sunday School. 
Here are laid the foundation stones of the Christian life. Here are formed habits 
and attitudes that will determine destiny. Here influences are set in motion that 
v/ill break only upon the sores of eternity. 

The Sunday School is the chief educational agency of the local church. The 
largest number of people, old and young, touched by Christian teachers is found 
in the Sunday School. In the Baptist Sunday Schools of the South there are 
nearly three million of these pupils. Last year in North Carolina there were 2,195 
schools with a membership of 346,639. Our Association reported 27 schools with 
6,327 pupils. This year we have 27 schools with a membership of 6510. A mar- 
velous opportunity is here placed in the hands of teachers and administration 
leaders to indoctrinate and enlist the people of our churches in the educational, 
missionary and benevolent ministry of the churches. 

The Sunday School is" an institution, an agency, a service of the local church 
that may be used for many things. It can be utilized to find the church con- 
stituency, to bring the unaffiliated into active relationship with the church, to 
visit the sick, to train workers, to enlist the idle, to utilize all in service, toi pro- 
vide great preaching congregations and to win the lost for Christ. Much was 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



done through the Enlargement Campaign in July of this year to help us see our 
possibilities along that line, however, only 17 of the 28 Sunday Schools took part 
in the campaign. 

The information gathered in this campaign shows that in the churches co- 
operating there was an enrollment of 4,371 with an average attendance of 2,790. 

The results of the census taken in these 17 churches show that they have 
possibilities of 7,642. The census further revealed that in these 17 church com- 
munities there are 2,065 unsaved people who prefer the Baptist church. 

On the basis of the information gathered through the Sunday School revival 
we have at least 12,000 possibilities for Sunday School in the Liberty Association. 
We, also, have probably more than 3,200 unsaved people in, the Association who 
are definite Baptist prospects. 

The definite challenge for the new year may be summarized as follows: 

1. To increase the Sunday School enrollment to 10,000. 

2. To departmentalize and grade the Sunday School. 

3. To secure better equipment where necessary. 

4. To have training classes in every church to train teachers and of- 
ficers and prospective teachers and officers. 

5. To have a definite program of visitation and enlistment in every 
church. 

6. To win the lost in the Sunday School through a program of Sun- 
day School evangelism. 

7. To stress church and denominational loyalty. 

8. To honor Jesus and promote his Kingdom work. 

We commend to the churches of our Association the workers and program of 
our State Sunday School Department. We urge them to adopt and use the pro- 
gram offered by them in promoting Sunday School work in the churches and the 
Association. Information, suggestions, free literature and helps can be had by 
writing Secretary L. L. Morgan, Raleigh, N. C. 

Respectfully submitted, 
B. J. MAY 

TEMPERANCE AND PUBLIC MORALS 

24. The Report on Public Morals and Temperance was made by Rev. E. L. 
Bradley. The report was discussed by L. E. Bradley and Rev. J. A. McKaughan, 
Winston -Salem, N. C, representing the United Dry Forces. The report was 
adopted. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE AND MORALS 

"It is difficult in such report as this to make even a brief survey of a few of 
the perplexing problems with which Christian people have to deal: the liquor 
problem; the gambling craze; wide-spread unemployment; the general let-down 
in moral standards and ideals, even the establishment of nudist colonies; vicious 
and corrupting motion pictures; the non-observance and desecraiton of the Christ- 
ian Sabbath; unusual experimentations and policies of government; mounting 
volume and cost of crime; unheard of appropriations for armies and navies— these 
are some the problems and conditions with which every sover-minded citizen, 
not to say Christian citizen, must think and pray and in connection with which 
in one way or another each one has his responsibility before God and men." 

In giving this report I think it would be futile to give statistics, we are all 
familiar, more or less, with the liquor problem. We know of the increase in 
drunkenness since the repeal of prohibition. We are familiar with the argument 
advanced by many people— who are supposed to be thinking people— concerninf? 
the liquor stores. We all know of our beautiful capital city that twice voted 
against a nine month school term because it would increase tax, but who within 
a few weeks after the last school election voted for the liquor stores, which within 
the first month sold whiskey to the amount of $52,000 plus, and then we weep 
about the heathens in China and Japan. Many advance the argument that 
whiskey is here, and here to stay, therefore make it legal and operate our schools 
with the tax. A county or state is getting, or rather is, on a very lew level moral- 
ly when it gets to the place it wishes to operate its schools on blood money. May 
our educational institutions burn to the ground before such shall happen. We 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



could use the same argument used by the whiskey powers and say make steahng 
legal— make killing legal. I believe that the prohibition law was enforced as well 
as any other law, and I think the record of the various courts will corroborate 
this assertion. 

However, we must realize that whiskey is not the only problem confronting 
us, and it may not be the biggest. Too long, far too long, have we accused the 
last war of being responsible for the moral let-down throughout the world. For 
some time I have questioned this. I think the moral let-down is due to the lack 
of reverence. The church and the Protestant minister has become the butt-end 
of all jokes, we have laughed and joked far too much about things that are sacred; 
and the peculiar thing is that we who are members of the church seem to get a 
laugh from the jokes hurled at the preachers and churches; that is, all except 
the Roman Catholics. The Protestant minister is made the goat for jokees from 
Ham-bone on up and down — ^not for once is the Priest laughed at in the periodi- 
cals, newspapers or motion pictures, they fear a boycott on the part of the Cath- 
olic church. 

When we come to crime and vice, the modern newspaper reads like the his- 
tory of Rome and Greece preceeding and during the earthly days of our Lord, 
and before the Glory that was Greece and the power that was Rome, departed. 
We speak about racketeering and murdering in Chicago and New York, and for- 
get that our fair city of Winston- Salem has a better record than either in homi- 
cides. 

The Sabbath day is no longer a Holy Day but a holiday. Our people have 
forgotten that this day is the Lord's and they take, what they say, is the only day 
they have, to visit Aunt Sallie and Uncle John whom they have not seen for 
months, or spend the Lord's day visiting in the mountains or at the seashore — 
our people are not in the Lord's house on the Lord's day. We must learn that it 
is impossible to honor the Lord of the Sabbath and not honor the Sabbath. His- 
tory teaches us that no nation has desecrated and forgotten the Lord's day, and 
long existed. And why do we think that America is immune? 

Some one has well said, "We do not need more trained leaders, but we 
need a more trained membership." No age has been blessed with more great 
preachers than the present age, and yet all up and down this fair state there have 
been many pastors who have been attacked not only by the non-church members 
but by many of his own church when he has sought to heed the admonition of 
the prophet "Cry loud and spare not." 

Too long have we hesitated, too long have been reluctant to cry out against 
the evil that is threatening our homes, our churches and our nations, but we 
must do it courageously, but we must do it in the spirit of our Christ. 

The time has come to vote, irregardless of party, for God-fearing men, who 
love God and who honor the Sabbath, and for men who know that no nation 
has ever drunk or ever gambled its way to prosperity. 

Too long have we come to associations and conventions and heard these re- 
ports and forgot them, the time to move is now, and under God, I believe that 
the noble group of pastors throughout the state working with the God-fearing 
men of our State Convention are going to move, and move in m.ighty and power- 
ful and telling way. 

Submitted by, 

EARLE L. BRADLEY 

25. A special collection for the Dry Cause was taken. The sum of $10.16 
was raised. 

26. The report on B. T. U. was written by G. G. Pridgen, in his absence it 
was read by Sam J. Smith and adopted without discussion. 

REPORT ON B. T. U. 

The Liberty Association Training Union diuring the past year has made good 
progress, although no new unions organized, we have had several new unions in 
attendance upon association quarterly meeting that we did not have last year, 
and plans are under way to organize churches with no unions this coming year, 
and we ask that pastors cooperate with our officers along this line. 

We were fortunate in having 39 members from our association attend Ridge- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



crest Assembly for the week this past July, and all came home with a determina- 
tion to get busy and do some real work for the Training Union. 

A great many unions have already had their study courses. Others are going 
on now and others to follow. Along this line the director is trying to arrange for 
association-wide training school next February which will reach all the churches 
in the association, which will be conducted by southwide experts and state ex 
perts for one whole week. If we are successful in getting these workers, we ask 
for cooperation from various pastors and Sunday schools throughout the association. 

Our attendance at quarterly meetings throughout the year has averaged over 
two hundred each meeting with a great deal of interest shown in each meeting, 
and we feel like we have one of the best Associational Training Unions in North 
Carolina if not in the Southern Baptist Convention, and we get this information 
from, records at Ridgecrest which covers our 17 Southern States. 

May we, as director, ask delegates assembled here, to let's think more of our 
Young People and realize we are losing thousands every year because we do not 
show an interest in them and their work, realizing that we are training them for 
the church of tomorrow — and we urge the churches to give more time and 
thought to this important work, and we won't have to worry about the churches 
of tomorrow. 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. G. PRIDGEN 

27. The committee heretofore appointed on Time, Place and Preacher made 
the folio v/ing report, which was adopted by the Body: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 
FOR THE 1938 SESSION 

We recommend to the Body the following: Time— Tuesday and Wednesday, 
September 6 and 7, 1938; Place— Denton Baptist Church; Preacher— Rev. John A. 
McMillian; Alternate Preacher — Rev. L. J. Matthews. 

For the Spring Session— Plans for this session to discretion of Mod- 
erator and executive committee. 

Signed, 

W. K. McGEE, 
E. C. ROACH, 
HOYLE LOVE, 
D. S. HAYWORTH, 
T. M. BRAY, 

Committee on Time, Place and 

Preacher 

28. The committee heretofore appointed on Nominations, reported as follows 
which was adopted: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 

We recommend to the Body the following: 

Program Committee for 1938, the Moderator and Clerk of the Association, pas- 
tor the church, with which the next session meets and W. L. Warfford. 

Orphanage Representative, J. A. McMillan; Committee on Digest of Church 
Letters for 1938: Sam J. Smith and W. L. Warfford; For chairman of executive 
promotion committee: Walter L. Warfford. 

Signed, 

S. J. SMITH, 

G. W. MILLER, 

L. E. HEPLER, 

WALTER L. WARFFORD, 

Committee on Nominations 

For names of persons appointed to make the various reports next year see 
page No. 3. 

29. Sam J. Smith, Treasurer of the Body, made the following report, which 
was adopted: 



20 



MINUTES OP THE 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 
Receipts and Disbursements of the 1936 Session, reported at the 1937 Session 



Receipts 

Abbotts Creek $ 6.00 

Carolina Avenue 1.75 

Center Hill 2.50 

Churchland 6.00 

Denton 6.50 

Holloways 3.00 

Jersey 3.70 

Lexington 30.00 

Liberty 3.00 

Lick Creek 3.00 

New Friendship 8.00 

Mills Home 12.00 

Pleasant Plains 1.60 

Reeds 5.00 

Rich Fork 5.00 

Smith Grove 3.50 

Southside 3.00 

Stoners Grove 4.00 

Summerville 4.80 

Erlanger 5.00 

Wallburg 5.00 

Walters Grove 1.35 

Welcome 3.00 

Sheets Memorial 4.00 

Taylors Grove 1.00 

Thomasville 16.00 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Postage $ 4.60 



Dispatch for printing 
1937 Minutes 



Phone Calls 



100.00 



.60 



Stationery Rose Press 5.00 

Retained for my service 
as Clerk 33.50 



Paid Mills Home for 
printing Programs 



4.00 



Total Disbursements $147.70 



Total Receipts $147.70 

30. The following resolution was offered by Sam J. Smith, which the associa- 
tion adopted: 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS 

Be it resolved that we, The delegates and members of the Liberty Association, 
extend to the Pastor, Members and Friends of the Churchland church our sincere 
thanks, gratitude and appreciation for their most kindly and abundant entertain- 
ment, which they have extended unto us, while in their midst. 

SAM J. SMITH 



31. The Committee on Obituaries reported at this time. The association arose 
and stood while the list was read by Sam J. Smith, and a special prayer was of- 
fered by Rev. H. M. Stroup. For the names and the report, see page 21. 

MINUTES DEDICATED TO MEMORY OF LATE REV. H. T. FENRY 

32. Upon motion of G. W. Miller thei Body voted to dedicate the Minutes of 
this session to the memory of Rev. H, T. Penry, who died during the year, and 
who was at the time of his death the senior pastor in the association. 

The Body adjourned at 4:15 P. M. 
R. D. COVINGTON, SAM J. SMITH 

Moderator Clerk 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE WHO HAVE GONE TO 


THEIR REWARD SINCE OUR LAST SESSION 


"Blessed are the Dead, which die in the Lord" 


"In My Father's 


House are many Mansions'' 


The following of our number have died since our last meeting: 




TV 171/1/ TT'Tj-f pi-VTl^STITT* • 


Mr. Le«5 Charles 


Mr. Will Teaguie 




Mr. Riley E. Lambeth 


Uxl LI JvUrtJ^iiiN JJ : 


Mr. Chas. A, Mendenhall 


Mr. J. M. Green 


Mr. Robah Lambeth 


Miss Ida Hartley 






Deacon Neal Carter 


IVTrv W R 'Rii,s!«p11 


Mj* HiiP'h Cra-Vftf* 


Mr. Vernon B. Cashatt 


Mrs. J. G. Sink 


Mr. Richard W. T. Bean 


ROTTT'ff SI DF • 

iJ\^ KJ X IM.ijM.MJ Mil a 


Deacon James I. Snider 




Mrs. N. H. Goodwin 


ERLANGER 




Mr. W. D. Haynes 


STONERS GROVE: 




Pastor R€v. H. T. Penry 


LEXINGTON 


Mrs. J. D. Lookabill 


Miss Callie Carroll 


Mr. Chiarlie Warfford 


Deacon C. W. Trice 




Mrs. J. R. Cecil 


SUMMERVILLE: 


Mrs. Eliza Davis 


Mrs. Crissie Thompson 


Mrs. A. D. Yarbrouffh 


THOMAS VILLE : 


Mr. Jacob L. Tate 


Mr. E. G. Hunt 


Mrs. Rachel Boles 


Mr. J. A. Siceloff 


Mr. F. E. Everhart 


Mrs. Lester Reddick 


Mr. J. E. Kindley 


Mr. A. A. Gilbert 




Mr. G. L. Cope 


WALLBURG: 


Mrs. Roy Walker 


Mrs. Catherine Mendenhall 


LIBERTY 


WALTERS GROVE: 


Deacon T. G. Kindley 


Mrs. Sarah Hill 


Mrs. Frances Snider 


Mr. John Hill 


Mrs. Mamie Whitaker 


Mrs. W. E. Oglesby 


LICK CREEK: 


WELCOME: 


Mrs. Lillie Wall 


Deacon J. F. Crotts 




Signed, 




A. L. SNIDER, 




C. F. MOTSINGER, 




H. M. STROUP, 




Committee on Obituaries 



22 



MINUTES OF THE 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2, It shall be the object of this association to furnish the gospel (as 
we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the association, and to co-operate 
with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the association, 
pastors of the churches in the association, and messengers from the churches. 
Each church shall be entitled to three messengers and one additional messenger 
for every 50 members or fraction thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, vice-modera- 
tor, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected each year by the associa- 
tion at its annual meeting and shall hold office until their successors are elected. 
The duties of the officers shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in 
like organizations, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee each year 
whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached in all parts of the 
association, and to attend to all business in the association between the session 
and to make such reports as they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the 
association. The association may appoint or elect such other boards or commit- 
tees from time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually on Tuesday after the first 
Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request of the Executive Com- 
mittee change the time or the place of meeting of this association when it may 
be deemed by him not expedient to meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive Committee may 
fill any vacancy occurring between meeting of the association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular session of the 
association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of Order foi 
Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 
Churches that fail to contribute to benevolences inasmuch as the Liberty 
Association has as its chief function the propagation of a missionary spirit 
among our people, and inasmuch as a church which fails to contribute to bene- 
ficences outside its local budget fails to justify its claim of being a missionary 
Baptist church, we therefore recommend that a church which contributes nothing 
to missionary objects beyond, its borders have the fellowship of the association 
removed from it, if after a year from its report to the association it shows no im- 
provement in its gifts. - 
; See page 12, 1928 Minutes. 

; DATE OF CLOSING ASSOCIATIONAL YEAR CHANGED 

: In order that the committee on the Digest of Church Letters might have 
their report ready for the first day of the Association in the future, Rev. Walter 
Warfford, of Lexington, makes motion that our Association year close with the 
last Sunday in August each yiear, and that immediately after this date the dif- 
ferent church clerks prepare their letters and mail them to the Clerk of the As- 
sociation. 

See page 29, 1931 Minutes. 

ADVISORY BOARD OR COMMITTEE 
1, We recommend that this Executive Committjee be abolished. . - 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



That a board, to be known as the Advisory Board, be appointed by the As- 
sociation. 

1. That this board be composed of one member elected by each church in 
the Association, with the Moderator, Clerk and all pastors ex officio members. 

2. That there shall be a chairman of the board appointed from the member- 
ship thereof by the Association. 

3. That there shall be a Secretary to the board appointed from the mem- 
bership thereof by the Association. 

4. That the chairman and secretary be elected from the board and by the 
board after this year. 

5. That this board shall have the right and power to fill by appointment 
any vacancy or vacancies which may occur upon the recommendation from the 
church from which such vacancy or vacancies may occur. 

6. That this board shall be at all times subject to the Acts of the Association. 
See 1933 Minutes. 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year 



WHERE HELD 



IJamestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
2Pine Meeting- H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
3Big- Creek 
IJamestown 
I Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
I No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
SBig- Creek 
2Pine Meeting- H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

Summerville 

Lexington 



PREACHER 



Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 
Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stokes 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Reid 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
TL Morton 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 



CLERK 



Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
By Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year 



WHERE HELD 



Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting- H 

Hig-li Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant 'Grove 

Denton 
5Piney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

Lexington 

Lick Creek 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting- H 

New Friendship 

Tliomasville 

Wallburg- 

Denton 

Liberty 

Orphanage 

Abbotts Creek 

Stoners Grove 

Rich Fork 

Holloways 

Center Hill 

Wallburg- 

Smith Grove 

Lexington 

Denton 

New Friendship 
Churchland 
Summerville 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds 
Liberty 
Rich Fork 
Thomasville 
Holloways 
Stoners Grove 
Abbotts Creek 
Denton 
Lexington 
Lick Creek 
Jersey 
Mills Home 
Reeds 
Churchland 



PREACHER 



J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J. K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 
C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 
W. A. Smith 
Geo. P. Harrill 
John R. Miller 
J. S. Farmer 
Dr. R. T. Vann 
M. L. Kesler 
S. D. Swaim 
O. A. Keller 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
M. L. Kesler 

G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
T. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler 
R. E. White 

J. S. Hardaway 
M. L. Kesler 
W. A. Hough 
W. L. Barrs 
C. H. Trueblood 
C. A. Owens 
E. N. "Gardner 

H. T. Penry 
M. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 
M. L. Kesler 

M. O. Alexander 
G. A. Martin 
E. F. Mumford 
W. L. Warfford 
E. C. Roach 
J. A. Neilson 
W. K. McGee 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner ' 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
O. A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 



CLERK 



Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
>P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 

4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now Wallburg 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE W. M. U. OF LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Association held its thirty-first 
annual meeting with Stoners Grove Baptist Church, Southmont, April 23, 1937. 
Miss Sallie L, McCracken, the superintendent, called the meeting to order at 10 
o'clock and the congregation joined in singing "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name." 
The theme for the program was "Christ for the World." The morning devotional 
was given by Mrs. B. F. Duncum, who used for her Scripture Matt. 28:19-20. Rev. 
Hoyle Love led in prayer. Greetings given by Mrs. R, O. Hedrick and response 
by Mrs. P. M. Hendricks gave the assemly a feeling of precious unity. The his- 
tory of the Year's Hymn, "Christ for the World We Sing," was given by Mrs. H. 
L. Swann, after which the congregation sang one verse of the hymn. Visitors 
recognized included those coming from distant places, members of other churches 
in Southmont, and pastors of the association. Mrs. C M. Howell used for her 
topic "With Loving Zeal" in discussing the work of Margaret Fund, Training 
School and Heck Memorial. 

"With One Accord"— Reports of Officers: 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



PERSONAL SERVICE 

Number of societies doing personal service this year 47 in 16 churches — an in- 
crease over last year of 4 societies and 2 churches. Number of societies doing 
personal service: W. M. S. 16, Y. W. A. 9, G. A. 7, R. A. 7, Sunbeam 7. Kinds of 
service done are visits, flowers, cards and trays to sick; linens to Hospital; boxes 
to Orphanage; literature to Negro Sunday School; help to Missionaries; clothing 
for less fortunate children; quilts for needy families; and services held with shut- 
ins, 

MRS. A. Fj WARPFORD, Personal Service Chairman 
MISSION STUDY 
No. Classes— W. M. S. 18, Y. W. A. 5, G. A. 7, R. A. 6, S. B. 4. 

No. enrolled in classes— W. M. S. 299, Y. W. A. 57, G. A. 140, R. A. 84, 
S. B. 152. 

No. Awards to W. M. S.— Cards 23, small seals 254, Hm. & For. 13, Official 
Seals 4, Honor Certificates 3, Reading Cards 4, stamps 18. 
No. Awards to Young People— Certificates 182, Seals 165. 
No. Awards to Brotherhood — Certificates and Seals 5. 

According to reports sent to the Associational Mission Study Chairman during 
the past year, nine societies reported mission study classes, ,while six had no re- 
port to make. By being informed in the work done at home and abroad, our in- 
terest is our local activities and special offerings will be enlarged. 

The Great Commission of "Go Ye into all the World" was not meant to ex- 
clude those who stay at home for with prayers and substance we carry on our part 
with increased interest when rightly informed of the work being done by others. 
So let us strengthen and build up our Woman's Missionary Societies in Liberty As- 
sociation through Mission Study, and apply to ourselves the words of Paul in his 
letter to Timothy— <"Study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that 
needeth not to be ashamed rightly dividing the word of truth." 

MRS. VIRGIL R. PARKER, Mission Study Chairman 
YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 

Sent Stewardship literature to all churches. July 26, held Stewardship Con- 
tests at New Friendship with four churches represented and 14 children taking 
part. Winners: Sunbeam — Alta Bigby, Churchland; Jr. G. A. — Ruth Beeson, New 
Friendship; Jr. R. A.— Kemp Swaim, New Friendship; Int. G. A. — Verona Bigby, 
Churchland; Int. R. A.— Claud Cook, Wallburg; Y. W. A.— Nelle Davis, Church- 
land. August 23 took Kemp Swaim and Ruth Beeson to Mills Home for Divisional 
Contest. I attended a meeting for leaders. Plans for camps for summer were 
discussed. Made effort to get Sunbeam Bands organized in all churches not hav- 
ing one. Two bands were organized — Churchland and Jersey. 

Cards for year 16; letters 8; visits 1; new societies 2 (S. B.) 

OLA CROWDER, Leader 

MARGARET FUND 

Number of societies reporting 14; amount forwarded to Mrs. J. J. Roddick, 
Divisional Chairman^ $5.80 as a love gift for our Margaret Fund student— Rachel 
Leonard. Letters and cards written, 18. 

MRS. ALDA CRAVER, Chairman 
TREASURER'S REPORT 



Forward Jan. 1, 1936 $ 9.95 

Collected 23.70 



Total $33.65 $33.65 

Disbursements 

To Mrs. J. Clyde Turner for Mrs. D. F. Stamps $ 7.00 

To Miss McCracken for Programs, Stamps, etc 15.00 

To Mrs. B. K. Mason for Charlotte Division Expense 2.00 



Total $24.00 $24.00 

Balance Dec. 31, 1936 $9.65 



MRS. MASKEY M. SMITH, Treasurer 



26 



MINUTES OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

While the report for 1936 is not aH that we would like, it is Ratifying to note 
by comparison with other years that we have gone forward several steps in most 
all of our work and the 31st session of the Liberty W. M. U. is receiving its best 
reports so far as visible results can be obtained. 

We had 73 societies at the close of the year. New Friendship held its place 
as the only full graded A-1 society in the association, and nine others are full 
graded. 

The following individual societies made the A-1 grade: Churchland W. M. S.; 
Lexington W. M. S., Jr. G. A.— Int. R. A.— S. B.; Wallburg W. M. S.— S. B; Mills 
Home Int. R. A. — Lake and Gallimore Jr. R. A. — ^Lockett and Naomio Schell Jr. 
G. A.— S. B.; Erlanger Jr. R. A,— S. B. 

Meetings attended during the year: Liberty Association, State Convention, Char- 
lotte Division, Southern Baptist Convention at S. Louis. 

We are asked to place special emphasis on the Hundred Thousand Club and 
the contributions of books or money to the Lila L. Henry Memorial Library at 
Wingate College this year. This shows a considerable increase over the preced- 
ing year and we hope to surpass last yea.r during the year 1937. 

SALLIE L. Mccracken, superintendent 

PARTIAL LIST OF CONTRIBUTIONS OF 1936 



Cooperative Program $3819.09 

Home Missions (81.50 Negrins 422.18 

State Missions 180.56 

H. T. C 407.00 

Heck Memorial 153.40 

Orphanage 623.67 

Lottie Moon 553.37 

Foreign Missions Special $227.95 781.32 

Hospital 167.00 

Training School 42,53 

Margaret Fund 53.06 

State Expense Fund 30.00 

Associational Expense Fund 23.70 



To the Roll Call of Churches all except 4 responded. Thomasville had the 
largest number of representatives, there being 15 present. The brief words given 
by the presidents were encouraging. The congregation sang "O Worship the 
King." Mrs. L. S. Gaines used for her topic "Inspired with Hope" in telling what 
had been accomplished through the 100,000 Club. Mrs. L. J. Matthews used the 
subject "With Fervent Prayer" in discussing the Seasons of Prayer. In a brief 
conference committees were appointed. Mrs. Eph Whisenhunt brought the Mis- 
sionary address of the day. Our hearts rejoiced as she told how time after time 
the work of the Missionaries had prospered and their lives had been protected as 
a result of prayer. 

Adjourned for lunch. 

Assembling promptly at 2:15, the congregation sang the hymn, "O Zion 
Haste," The afternoon devotional was brought by Miss Esther Ward who used 
for her subject "The World to Christ We Bring," based on John 10:46. The W. 
M, U, of Stoners Grove church gave an interesting playlet, "Our Youth of To- 
morrow," This was followed ' by a very timely talk by Mrs. W. K. McGee, "Our 
Youth for Christ." Mrs. Edna R. Harris brought an inspirational address which 
was very helpful. 

Reports of Committees: 

The place recommended for the next meeting is Wtelcome Baptist church and 
the time the last week in April. Committee: Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Mrs. R, L. Palmer, 
Mrs. Clyde Edinger. 

The Obituary Committee has received the following names of members who 
have passed away during the year: Lexington society — Miss Callie Carroll, Mrs. 
John Cecil, Mrs. R. L. Walker; Thomasville — Mrs. D. M. Clemmons and Mrs. M. 
C. Elledge; Stoners Grove— Mrs. J. D. Lookabill. Our hearts go out in sympathy 
to the bereaved ones and we recommend them to the Source of all comfort, the 
One who is able to sustain in the hour of trial. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



This Associationai Union wishes to go on record in expression of sympathy 
for the family of the beloved pastor of this church, Rev. H. T. Penry, who re- 
cently was called to "come up higher." Always he stood for the things of right- 
eousness and was in full accord with the aims of Woman's Missionary Union in 
furtherance of the Gospel. He will be missed in his association and we "sorrow 
that we see his face no more." 

Committee: Mrs. R. S. Green and Mrs. Emma Mayberry. Following the read- 
ing of the above report, Rev. E. C. Roact:! made a brief talk in memory of those 
who have passed away and Rev. Hoyle Love led in prayer. 

The Nominating Committee submil^ the following names: 

Supterintendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 

Assocoiate Superintendent, Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, Route 4, Winston- Salem, N. C. 

Mission Study Chairman, Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 

Personal Service Chairman, Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Route 6, Lexington, N. C. 

Young People's Leader, Miss Ola Crowder, Route 5, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Margaret Fund Chairman, Mrs. Alda Craver, Route 3, Lexington, N. C. 

Committee, Mrs. C. F. Motsinger, Mrs. W. P. Westmoreland, Mrs. T. O Styers, 
Mrs. L. H. Wilson. Mrs. Edna R. Harris received the vote and the adoption was 
unanimous. 

Courtesy: We wish to express our thanks to our Supt. and the officers asso- 
ciated with her for the splendid program they have given us, for the presence of 
Rev. and Mrs. Eph Whisenhunt, of Elkin, and Mrs. Edna R. Harris and for the 
inspiring messages brought us. We appreciate the presence of so many pastors. 
We thank the ladies of Stoners Grove for their courtesy and gracious entertain- 
ment and especially the delicious lunch. We shall cherish the sweet fellowship 
of the day. 

Conmiittee: Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Mrs. D. F. Conrad. 

With the suggestion of the superintendent the societies voted to give to the 
treasurer out of the treasury $5.00 for her own use. In closing he program for the 
day, Rev. Eph Whisenhunt gave a deep spiritual message based on parts of the 
fourth chapter of Mark and led in prayer. 

MRS. MASKEY M. SMITH, Secretary 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 

PASTORS OF THE LIBERTY ASSOCIATIONT 

Name Address Church Member of 

Barringer, C. D., Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 2 Smith Grove 

Bradley, E. L., Spencer, N. C Churchland 

Bray, J. W., Pleasant Garden, N. C Abbotts Creek 

Cox, J. A., Central Falls, N. C Carolina Avenue 

Darnell, W. C, Thomasville, N. C Southside 

Eddinger, Clyde, Welcome, N. C Welcome 

Gaines, L. S., Lexington, N. C Lexington 

Hopkins, W. B., China Grove, N. C Walters Grove 

Hunt, Howard, Denton, N. C Pleasant Plains 

Love, Hoyle, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 Reeds 

Matthews, L. J., Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 Wallburg 

McGee, W. K., Thomasville, N. C Thomasville 

Mumford, E. F., High Point, N. C, Rt 1 Liberty 

Neilson, J. A., Thomasville, N. C Mills Home 

Pickler, J. M., Albemarle, N. C Taylors Grove 

Roach, E. C., Erlanger, N. C Erlanger 

Stroup, H. M., Denton, N. C Denton 

Warfford, Walter L., Lexington, N. C, Box 122 Sheets Memorial 

ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE ASSOCIATION 
WHO ARE NOT PASTORS 

Name Church Member of Address 

Andrews, N. C. (Inactive) Rich Fork ....San Diego, Calif. 

Caldwell, R. N. (Retired) Taylors Grove .New London, N. c] 

Clark,_ F, Bv (Inactive) Walters Grove , .......................Lexington, N. O. Rt 2 



28 



MINUTES OF THE 



Frank A. L. (Inactive) Summerville Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Floyd,' C. M. (Inactive) Southside Thomasville, N. C. 

Gallimore, Arthur (Missionary) Lexington Canton, China 

McMillan, J. A. (Editor C. & C.) Mills Home Thomasville, N. C. 

Newton, J. D. (Retired) Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

Williams, R. T. (Inactive) Pleasant Plains - Trinity, N. C, Rt. 1 

ASSISTANT PASTORS AND EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 

None. 

B. T. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Office Name Address 

Pastor— Rev. Louis S. Gaines 414 State St., Lexington, N. C. 

Director— G. G. Pridgen P. O. Box 119, Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Director— Mrs. C. M. Howell Thomasville, N. C. 

Publicity Director— Tolbert I. Stroud Lexington, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer— Miss Wilma Bray Thomasville, N, C. 

Assistant Sec.-Treas.— W. E. Oglesby Thomasville, N. C, R. F. D. 

Chorister— L. W. Hansell Thomasville, N. C. 

Pianist— Mrs. Tolbert I. Stroud Lexington, N. C. 

Adult Leader— S. A. AUred Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Senior Leader— Talford Maley Thomasville, N. C. 

Intermediate Leader — Vacancy 

Junior Leader — Mrs. John Brewer Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Group Group Director Address 

1. Lexington— T. B. Marlin Erlanger, N. C. 

2. Thomasville— Miss Mozelle Clinard Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2 

3. Denton— Carlie Davis Denton, N. C. 

LOCAL B. T. U. PRESIDENTS, LEADERS AND DIRECTORS 

ABBOTTS CREEK — Pres. Senior Union, T. Carrick Teague, Kernersville, N. C. 

CAROLINA AVENUE-HPres. Senior Union, Miss Ethel Carter; Leader Int. 
Union, Geo. Poole; Leader Jr. Union, Miss Lillian Summey, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCHLAND— Director, S. A. Allred; Pres. B. A. U., L. E. Rickard; Leader 
Int., Hugh Beck; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. John Brewer, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1; Pres. 
Sr. Union, Kathleen Kesler, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5. 

DENTON— Director, C. H. Davis; Pres. B. A. U., Mrs. R. A. Allen; Pres. Sr. 
Union, William Snider, Jr.; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. Ben Carroll; Leader Jr. Union, 
Mrs. C. H. Davis, Denton, N. C. 

ERLANGERr— Director, Miss Helen McDade; Pres. B. A. U., V. V. Everhart; 
Pres. Sr. Union, Fred Crowell; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. E. C. Putnam; Leader Jr. 
Unions, Mrs. E. C. Roach and Mrs. C. C. Church; Leader Story Hour, Mrs. T. B. 
Marlin, Erlanger, N. C. 

JERSEY — Pres. Senior Union, Harold Tate, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

LEXINGTON— Director Talbert Stroud; Pres. B. A. U., Mrs. E. O. Webster; 
Leader Int. Union, W. E. Leonard; Leader Jr. Union, Miss Bernice Apple, Lex- 
ington, N. C. 

LIBERTY— Director, L. V. Miller; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. L. V. Miller, Thom- 
asville, N. C, Rt. 2; Pres Sr. Union, B. J. May, Jr.; Pres. B. A. U., Mrs. B. J. May, 
Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2. 

MILLS HOME— Director, J. A. Neilson; Pres. Sr. Union, Miss Mary Sue 
Humphries; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. Romulus Skroggs; Leader Jr. Union, Miss 
Ethel Johnson, Thomasville, N. C. 

REEDS — Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. J. F. Koonts, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

RICH FORK— Director, Hannah Clinard; Pres. Sr. Union, Carlyle Eddinger; 
Leader Int. Union, Miss Mozelle Clinard; Leader Jr. Union, Hannah Clinard, 
Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Director, Hoyt Williams; Pres. B. A. U., Mrs. T. J. 
Peters; Pres. Sr. Union, Mae Byards; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. W. L. Warfford; 
Leader Jr. Union, Ed Anderson, Lexington, N. C. 

SOUTHSIDE— Director, Paula Guin; Pres. B. A. U., Tafton Rabon; Pres. Sr. 
Union, C. C. Roberts; Leader Int. Union, Margie Hubbard; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. 
W. C. Darnell, Thomasville, N. C. 

THOMASVILLE— Director, G. G. Pridgen; Pres. B. A. U., C. C. Freeman; 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



Pres. Sr. Union, Douglas Bray; Leader Int. Union, Miss Mary Brown; Leader Jr. 
Union, Miss Ruby Walton, Thomasville, N. C. 

WALLBURG— Director, Miss Etta Teague; Pres. Sr. Union, Ray Rothrock; 
Leader Int. Union, Mrs. C. W. Souther; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. Ruth McGee, 
Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Superintendent— Miss Sallie McCracken Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Superintendent— Mrs. C. M. Howell Thomasville, N. C. 

Sec.-Treas.— Mrs. M. M. Smith Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 

Mission Study Chairman — Mrs. L. S. Gaines Lexington, N. C. 

Personal Service Chairman — ^Mrs. A. F. Warfford Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Young People's Leader — Mrs. Ola Crowder Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

Margaret Fund Chairman — Mrs. Alda Craver Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

LOCAL PRESIDENTS 

ABBOTTS CREEK — Miss Minnie Hayworth, High Point, N. C, Rt. 4. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. J. E. Hoyle, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. B. P. Duncum, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

ERLANGER-^Mjs. L. a. Carswell, Erlanger, N. C. 

HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. T. O. Styers, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

JERSEY— Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Linwood, N. C. 

LEXINGTON — Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Lexington, N. C. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. T. A. Slate, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2. 

MILLS HOME— Miss Esther Ward, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

REEDS — Mrs. Alda Craver, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

RICH FORK— Mrs. W. M. Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. .1 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. J. W. Byars, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. W. C. Darnell, Thomasville, N. C. 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. Raymond Monsess, Southmont, N. C. 

THOMASVILLE-^Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 

WALLBURG— Miss Etta Teague, Wallburg, N. C. 

WELCOME— Mrs. T. H. Jills, Welcome, N. C. 

Y. W. A. COUNSELORS 
CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. J. C. Poole, Thomasville, N. C. 
CHURCHLAND— Mrs. Carl Wilson, Thomasville, N. C. 
DENTON— Mrs. A. M. Gallimore, Denton, N. C. 
ERLANGER— Mrs. E. C. Putnam, Erlanger. N. C. 
HOLLOWAYS-^Miss Elva Crook, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. C. C. Wall, Lexington, N. C. 
MILLS HOME— Miss Louise McMillan, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. Geo. Bading, Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. Mary Brewer, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG— Mrs. C. V. Teague, Wallburg, N. C. 

G. A. LEADERS 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Miss Ethel Carter, Thomasville, N. C. 
CHURCHLAND— Texie Sowers, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

ERLANGERr-Miss Helen McDade and Mrs. V. V. Everhart, Erlanger, N. C. 
HOLLOWAYS— Miss Ida Beanblossom, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. A. A. Team, Lexington, N. C. 
MILLS HOME— Miss Beatrice Council, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. Addie Pope, Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 
RICH FORK— Miss Mozelle Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. Frank Everhart, Lexington, N. C. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
THOMASVILLE— Miss Elizabeth Teague, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG— Miss Stella Crook, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

R, A. LEADERS 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. Pay Davis, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 



30 



MINUTES OF THE 



ERLANGER— Mrs. C. C. Church, Erlanger, N. C. 

HOLLOWiAYS— Donald Dickens, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. Spaugh Thomason, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5. 

MILLS HOME— Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Miss Jenette Kiger, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

THOMASVILLE — Miss Blanche Gantt, Thomasville, N.. C. 

WALLBURG— Miss Evangeline Pardue, Wallburg, N. C. 

SUNBEAM LEADERS 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. H. D. Lyndon, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCHLAND— Elaine Lomax, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

ERLANGER — Mrs. Artie Lindsay, Erlanger, N. C. 

HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. G. C. Palmer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

JERSEY— Miss Elizabeth Smith, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. R. W. Martin, Lexington, N. C. 

MILLS HOME — Miss Annie Laura At well, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. Willie Doby, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

RICH FORK— Miss Vera Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 

THOMASVILLE— Mrs. ^/\^akefield Stone, Thomasville, N. C. 

WALLBURG— Mrs. William King, Wallburg, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 
LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

Associational Superintendent — ^C. F. Motsinger Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

Secretary-Treasurer — Maskey M. Smith Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 

Chorister— L. W. Hansel Thomasville, N. C. 

DEPARTMENT SUPERINTENDENTS 

Cradle Roll— Mrs. C. L. Black Thomasville, N. C. 

Beginner — ^Miss Elizabeth Smith Linwood, N. C. 

Primary — Miss Stella Cook Wallburg, N C. 

Junior — Miss Mattie Bean Lexington, N. C. 

Intermediate — Mrs. Romulus Skaggs Thomasville, N. C. 

Young People — Mr. Wilford Eddinger Thomasville, N. C. 

Adult— Mr. W. P. Westmoreland Thomasville, N. C. 

Extension — ^Mr. Henry Lomax Linwood, N. C. 



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Literty Baptist Association 

Nortk Carolina 

1938 

One Jiandn^ed and Si/dU Amuud Sediicm 

HELD WITH 

Denton Baptist Ckurcli 
DENTON, N. C. 

^epiemJm^ 6tk and 7tk, f93? 

Tke next Session will Le lielJ Septemter 5-6, 1939, 
witk tlie WallLurg CLurcli, Wallturg, N. C. 



INDEX 



Addresses 10-15 

Appointment of Committes 8 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 29 

Auxiliaries — Associational 24-25-26-27-28-29 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 3 

Biblical Recorder Representative 11 

Church Clerks 36 

Church Directories 28 

Church Treasurers 37 

Committees: Promotion Executive 3 

On Nominations 8 

Finance 8 

Program for 1939 19 

To Report for 1939 Chairman 19 

On Time, Place and Preacher 8 

Standing 3 

Constitution and By-Laws 22 

Deceased Members 21 

Directories : Associational 3-24 

Church 28 

B. Y. P. U 24 

Ordained Ministers 28 

R. A. and G. A 30 

Sunibeams 31 

W. M. U 25 

Election of Officers : 11 

Historical Table 23 

Messengers 4 

Order of Business = 5 

Orphanage Representative 19 

Pastors of Association 28 

Proceedings, Associational 5 

Reports: Baptist Periodicals 7 

Committee on Obituaries 21 

B. T. U 18 

Committee on Resolutions 15 

Committee on Nominations 19 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 19 

Digest of Church Letters 10-11 

Foreign Missions 14 

Hospitals 9 

Education 9 

Mills Home 6 

Home Missions 14 

Ministerial Relief 9 

Public Morals 15 

State Missions 13 

Sunday Schools 17 

Treasurer's 20 

W. M. U. Work 12 

Resolutions 20 

Statistical Tables 32-33-34-35-36-37-38-39- 

Sermon, Annual 8 

Special Collections 10-17 

Sunday School Superintendents 33 

Visitors 8 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries, Officers and Meetings 3 

Pastors 32 




Above is a likeness of the old church building at Denton and also 
one of the new church recently completed. Rev. H. M. Stroup is 
pastor of this church. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



DIRECTORY OF THE LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

Moderator, R. D. Covington Thomasville, N. C. 

Vice Moderator, G. W. Miller Lexington, N. C, 

Clerk and Treasurer, Sam J. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL PROMOTION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rev. J, A. Neilson, Chairman Thomasville, N. C. 

Carolina Avenue, B. L. Bostic Thomasville, N. C. 

Churchland, Henry Lomax Lexington, Rt. 5 

Denton, A. L. Snider Denton, N. C. 

Erlanger, E. C. Haynes Erlanger 

Holloways, J. W. Dickens, Jr Lexington, Rt. 6 

Jersey, R. L. Palmer Linwood 

Lexington, C. M. Wail Lexington 

Liberty, B. J. May Lexington, Rt. 2 

Mills Home, Dr. I. G. Greer Thomasville 

New Friendship, F. M. Lambeth Winston- Salem, Rt. 4 

Reeds, J. F. Foster Lexington, Rt. 3 

Rich Fork, Wilford Eddinger Thomasville 

Sheets Memorial, Lloyd Pass = Lexington 

Stoners Grove, L. E. Lookabille Southmont, N. C. 

Taylor's Grove, Adam Cram or d New London 

Thomasville, L. E. Teague Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg, C. V. Teague Wallburg, N. C. 

Walter's Grove, E. R. Klass , Cid. N. C. 



ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY AND OTHER PAID EMPLOYEES 

The Association has no Associational Missionary or paid workers. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

None. 

OFFICERS OF ASSOCIATIONAL WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

President, Miss Sallie McCracken Thomasville, N. C. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. Maskey M. Smith Winston- Salem, N. C. Rt. 4 

Enlistment Worker, Mrs. A. F. Warfford Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6 

The 1938 Annual Meeting was held with the church at Welcome, N. C, 
Wednesday, April 27, 1938 

ASSOCIATIONAL B. Y. P. U. OFFICERS 

Director, Rev. L. J. Matthews Winston- Salem, N. C. Rt. 5 

Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Mozelle Clinard Thomasville, N. C. 

For meetings see page 25. 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION OFFICERS 

President, C. F. Motsinger Winston- Salem, N. C. Rt. 5 

Secretary, Maskey M. Smith Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt. 4 

For meetings see page 25. 

ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE MEN'S BROTHERHOOD 

The Association has none. 

BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE ASSOCIATION AND 

OFFICERS OF SAME 



The Mills Home Thomasville, N. C. 

General Manager, I. G. Greer Thomasville, N. C. 

Treasurer, R. D. Covington Thomasville, N. C. 

Chairman Board of Trustees, B. W. Spilman Kinston, N. C. 



4 



MINUTES OP THE 



THE MESSENGERS TO THE 1938 SESSION 
(As Listed on the Church Letters) 
ABBOTTS CREEK— John Wblborn, Miss Mattie Teague, Mrs. J. P. Trant- 
ham, Grady Green. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. George McCaskiel, Mrs. A. L. Gordon, Mrs. Myr- 
tle Braswell, Miss Pauline Carter. 

CENTER HILL— Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Miller, Mr. G. R. Bean Mrs. Ray Owens, 
Lloyd Owens. 

CHURCHLAND— R. K. Williams, L. E. Rickard, Mrs. John Brewer, Mrs. J. C. 
Sowers. 

DENTON— R. C. Wall, Mrs. J. L. Snider, Edgar Snider, Ross Henderson. 
ERLANGER— Mrs. E. C. Roach, Mrs. B. L. Hames, Mr. Fred Brown. 
HOLLO WAYS—G. C. Palmer, Mrs. W. E. Shirley, Miss Edna Cook, Hugh 
Palmer. 

JERSEY— R. A. Tate, P. F. Smith, J. H. Pope, W. K. Trexler. 

LEXINGTON— G. W. Miller, Sam J. Smith, Miss Roxie Sheets, Rev. and Mrs. 
Louis S. Gaines, H. C. Myers, C. M. Wall, Miss Lantie Daniel, Miss Charlotte 
Tedder, C. M. Wall, Sr., Mrs. Belvin Beck, Rev. Otis Lanning. 

LIBERTY— N. F. Hooker, Mrs. N. F. Hooker, Mrs. B. J. May, Mrs. I. C. Clod- 
felter. 

LICK CREEK— Mrs. D. W. Snider, Miss Mayme Cole, Mrs. A. M. Cole. 
MILLS HOME— Mr. Romulus Skaggs, Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Mr. C. C. McKoin. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Chas. Lambeth, Samuel Snider, Mrs. Geo. Swaim. 
PLEASANT PLAINS— Not given on letter. 
REEDS— W^ebb Hege, Earlie Snider, J. F. Foster. 

RICH FORK^Willie Bowers, T. H. Small, Stimp Everhart, David Clinard. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL— Spurgeon Ayers, M. R. Frank. 

SMITH GROVE— Mrs. Joe Brewer, Mrs. Grady Clement, Mrs. Jessie Lassiter, 
Mrs. I. E. Lassiter. 

SOUTHSIDE— Not given on letter. 

STONER'S GROVE— Joe Long, A. A. Graves, F. J. Wrenn, A. J. Warfford. 

SUMMER VILLE— Mrs. Lucy Tysinger, Lois Carrick, M. L. Bean. 

TAYLOR'S GROVE— Mr. and Mrs. Adam Cranford, Mrs. J. R. Wbodard. 

THOMASVILLE— L. E. Teague, L. W. Hansell, E. B. Gantt, Mrs. Hilton Jones, 
Miss Stella Wagoner, Mrs. Paul Mailey, Mrs. Mae Brewer, Mrs. Forrest Grimes, 
Mrs. C. M. Howell, Mrs. L. G. Farmer, Mrs. J. N. Luther, Mrs. S. A. Renegar. 

WALLBURG — C. R. Dodson, Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, Ray Yokely. 

WALTER'S GROVE— Mr. and Mrs. John Yates, Mrs. Lythe Gallimore, Mrs. 
Hoover Byerly, Mrs. Annie Loftin. 

WELCOME— M. L. Craver, Raymond Disher, Mrs. John Disher. 

OAK GROVE SUNDAY SCHOOL— Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Summey, Mrs. Mar- 
vin Hedrick, Mrs. Beck. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Held with the chui'ch at 
DENTON, N. C. 



FIRST DAY 

Tuesday, September 6, 1938 

1. The One Hundred and Sixth Annual Session of the Liberty Baptist Asso- 
ciation convened with the church at Denton, N. C, Tuesday. September 6, 1938 
at 9:45 A. M. 

2. The devotional for the opening session was led by Rev. H. M. Stroup, pas- 
tor of the Denton church. 

3. The Association was called to order for the transaction of business by G. 
W. Miller, the Vice Moderator. 

4. Motion prevailed to send a message of sympathy to R. D. Covington, Mod- 
erator of the Association, who is sick in the Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem, 
N. C. Said message to be prepared and sent to Mr. Covington by the clerk, Sam 
J. Smith. 

5. The report of the program committee was read by Sam J. Smith and was 
adopted. 

One Hundred and Sixth Annual Meeting of the 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Tuesday and Wednesday, September 6-7, 1938 
Denton Baptist Church, Denton, N. C. 
First Day 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. H. M. Stroup 

10:00 Report of Program Committee Sam J. Smith 

10:10 Religious Literature Rev. W. C. Darnell 

10:30 Mills Home Rev. E. C. Roach 

11:15 Roll Call; Recognition of New Pastors and Visitors; Appointment of Com- 
mittees by the Moderator 

11:40 Annual Sermon Rev. J. A. McMillan 

12:30 Lunch 

Afternoon 

2:00 Praise and Worship Rev. E. L. Bradley 

2:15 State of the Churches Rev. J. A. Neilson 

1. Digest of Chmxh Letters (Blackboard) Rev. E. C. Roach 

2. Associational Goals for 1939 
3:00 Co-Operative Program 

1. Ministerial Relief Rev. Hoyle Love 

2. Baptist Hospitals Rev. E. F. Mumford 

3. Christian Education Rev. Tom W. Bray 

3:20 Address Rev. J. M. Hayes 

Second Day 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. L. J. Matthews 

10:00 Election of Officers and Business 

10:15 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. Fletcher Wall 

10:45 Co-Operative Program 

1. State Missions Rev. H. M. Stroup 

2. Home Missions Rev. C. D. Barringer 

3. Foreign Missions Mrs. Maskey M. Smith 



6 



MINUTES OP THE 



11:15 
11:45 
12:30 



Missionary Addre&s 

Address 

Lunch 



Rev. L. S. Gaines 

.Mr. M. A. Huggins, State Secretary 



Afternoon 



1:45 
2:00 
2:30 
3:00 
3:30 



Praise and Worship 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement 

Sunday Schools 

B. T. U 

Report of Committees, etc. 



.Rev. Clyde Eddinger 
....Rev. W. K. McGee 

Carroll C. Wall 

Talbert Stroud 



R. D. Covington, Moderator 
G. W. Miller, Vice Moderator 
Sam J. Smith, Clerk and Treasurer 



THE MILLS HOME 



6. The report on Mills Home was read by Rev. E, C. Roach, pastor of the 
Erlanger church. Upon motion to adopt, the report was discussed by Rev. E. C. 
Roach, Rev. J. A. Neilson, pastor of the Mills Home church, and was adopted. 



With deep gratitude we bring you another chapter in the history of the Or- 
phanage work. 

Perhaps no other Orphanage in the world is so bound up with the Sunday 
Schools as ours. Almost from the very beginning the chief support has come 
from the once-a-month offerings from the Sunday Schools. There are 2451 Sun- 
day Schools in North Carolina. If each one of these would send in a monthly 
offering it would enable the treasurer to pay all bills promptly, and would in- 
crease the spiritual life of their Sunday School and church. For we read "Pure 
religion and undefiled before God and the father is this to visit the fatherless 
and widows in their affliction and to keep one's self unspotted from the world." 
So far the once-a-month offering as adopted by the State Convention has proved 
the best and most satisfactory m.ethod of financing the orphanage. 

It costs approximately $546 per day to maintain the entire set up of the Or- 
phanage. Whatever else may happen in the world each morning the Orphanage 
authorities are faced with the stern reality that bills must be met and provisions 
made for the needs of the children. 

The purpose of the Baptist Orphanage as provided in the charter, section 
four, is "to prepare poor and promising orphans for the duties and responsibili- 
ties of life." 

The Orphanage therefore is not an institution for the feeble-minded, neither 
is it a reformatory. It functions in the field where it can be of the greatest 
service. 

The present policy is that no child be received without careful investigation. 
Each case is carefully diagnosed, therefore many applications are adjusted with- 
out the child being admitted to the Orphanage. New emphasis is being placed 
on the receiving end of the line. We are not saying every child in the Orphan- 
age should be there, some error could have been made in the application as well 
as in the receiving. Of equal importance is the going back to the old home com- 
munity, or new ones. It is of vast iinportance that they have a steadying hand as 
they go out to take their place in life. Most of the Orphanage children make 
good. Many of them are holding places of usefulness and honor, in the economic 
and church life in the communities where they live. 

An Orphans home is a place where sometimes the least prospect furnishes 
the greatest opportunity and the smallest investments brings the greatest re- 
turns. It is a channel through which men and women who want to do some- 
thing in the name of Jesus may enrich their spiritual lives. The Baptist of the 
Liberty Association should reflect their pride in the institution by supporting it 
100 per cent. And every true Baptist will as far as possible. 

The Orphanage stands for the building of character and fitting the boys 
and girls that come to it for two worlds. 

The child should be one of the deepest concerns of every man and every 
woman in the world. There are those that claim that for every homeless child. 



REPORT ON MILLS HOME 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



there is a childless home, where it can be placed, and therefore the Orphanage 
should be abandoned, but we will not argue the question here. However the best 
place for the child is in the foster home or adoptive home. 

Children institutions, and child caring agencies, are expected to continue to 
carry the load they are now carrying, and to meet those new demands which 
every day brings. No other institution in Christian civilization has the legal and 
moral right to produce children. "W^e have dedicated to other institutions the 
privilege and authority to train and educate the children who have been de- 
prived of their homes and home life. 

The primary function of the family is to bring children into the world and 
rear them. "Be it ever so humble there is no place like home." But too many 
American homes today have become homes of shame. The child has been brought 
into the home unwanted and unwelcomed. It has been brought in in a brutish 
beast-like way, just to satisfy the lust and passion of both man and woman. 
Sin then entered the home and the child entered the Orphanage. 

May God hasten the day when the American homes will come back to its 
sacredness of childbirth and realize the responsibility of rearing the child in "the 
way it should go." Rebuild the family altars where they have been broken down 
by Satan and sin, renew and rekindle the home ties again not to be broken again 
until the day is done, and to do this will mean happier and better homes and 
less orphan children. May the prayer of every Baptist in this Liberty Baptist 
Association and State be: that the rich blessings of the Triune God be upon our 
General Manager, Brother I. G. Greer, and his staff of co-workers as they from 
day to day face the many problems of the Orphanage that we know not of. 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. C. ROACH 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

7. The report on Religious Literature was read by Rev. J. A. Neilson, substi- 
tuting for Rev, W, C. Darnell, who was sick and had been appointed to bring the 
report by the committee. Upon motion to adopt the report is discussed by Rev, 
R, F. Terrell, State Representative of the Biblical Recorder, and is adopted, 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS 

One of the most neglected parts of our work is that which has to do with 
periodicals. The very papers that should be read the most and by the largest 
number of Baptists are read the least and by the smallest number. You have only 
to go into the homes of our Baptist people and look at the papers and magazines 
they are reading to have this fact verified. Think what it would mean to our 
whole denominational life if every Baptist who subscribes tc the daily paper sub- 
scribed to our denominational papers and read them as regularly and closely as 
they do the newspaper. THE NEWSPAPER GIVES THE PEOPLE THE INFOR- 
MATION THEY WANT PLUS SENSATION; OUR BAPTIST PERIODICALS 
GIVE THEM THE INFORMATION THEY NEED PLUS INSPIRATION. 

Our periodicals render a fourfold service. They serve the individual, the home, 
the church, and the denomination. 

In relation to the INDIVIDUAL, they keep him_ informed as to the needs of 
our Baptist work; they challenge him with statements of the work yet to be done; 
they strengthen his doctrinal views, and stimulate and encourage him in his own 
Christian life. 

In relation to the HOME, they fashion outlook on ilfe; quietly teach the im- 
portance of spiritual things; lay worthy foundations for spiritual building; and 
help to guide and shape the thoughts and ideals of growing youth. 

In relation to the CHURCH, they reinforce the message from the pulpit; they 
strengthen the ministry of the church by teaching Baptist doctrines, doctrines 
which need to be restated, re-explained and re-affirmed, so as to keep the minds 
of our people clear and strong in their beliefs in a day when much is being done 
to undermine our faith and destroy the foundations of Christian fundamentals. 

In relation to the DENOMINATION, our Baptist papersi are our chief unify- 
ing force, T^iey help to clear the denominational atmosphere, and contribute 
much to the increase of mutual understanding and spiritual unity. They also 



8 



MINUTES OF THE 



perform, a vast mission of enlistment. For example, it has been shown by actual 
survey that in churches which through the budget have put the state paper in 
each home for as long as two years, gifts per member of such churches to de- 
nomination causes more than doubled the gifts per member of churches which did 
not have the paper in the budget. 

As Baptists, we know what our periodicals are, and we also know that we 
ought to have them in our homes; BUT MERELY ADOPTING THIS REPORT 
WON'T PUT THEM THERE. All we have said in this report is so much time 
and effort v^asted unless it results in more subscribers to oui' Baptist papers. 
SUBSCRIPTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN REPORTS. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. A. NEILSON 
Prepared by request for W. C. Darnell who is ill. 

ROLL CALL AND APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES BY THE MODERATOR 

8. The roll call was made by the clerk, Sam J. Smith. All churches had a 
good delegation present. The Moderator at this time appointed the following 
committees : 

COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE— G. C. Palmer, L. E. Hepler, Rev. J. M. Pickler. 
TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER— Rev. Hoyle J. Love, Rev. L. J. Matthews, 
R. K. WiUiams. 

ON NOMINATIONS— W. K. McGee, Rev. Tom M. Bray, Sam J. Smith. 
TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1939— L. S. Gaines, Ben May, C. M. Wall. 
ON OBITUARIES— E. F. Mumford, E. C. Roach, B. R. Cross. 

G. W. MILLER, Moderator 

BOUQUET OF FLOWERS FOR MODERATOR COVINGTON 

9. Rev. L. S. Gaines at this time made a motion that che clerk of the Asso- 
ciation send a bouquet of flowers to R. D. Covington, Moderator of the Associa- 
tion, who is sick in the Baptist Hospital at Winston- Salem, N. C. $3.25 was do- 
nated for this. 

VISITORS RECOGNIZED 

10. Visitors were recognized at this time as follows: Rev. J. M. Hayes, repre- 
sentative of Meredith College, from the Pilot Mountain Association; Rev. Chas. 
B. Tranmel, Moderator of the Montgomery Association; Rev. Reid Harris, Mount 
Gilead, N. C; Rev. E. M. Byerly, of Sandy Creek Association; Rev. T. J. White- 
head, pastor of Methodist Protestant Church, Henderson, N. C; Rev. R. F. Ter- 
rell, representative of the Biblical Recorder, Raleigh, N. C; Rev. V. H. Harrell, 
Pilot Mountain Association; Roy E. Bell, ministerial student at Lenoir-Rhyne Col- 
lege, Hickory, N. C; J. D. Marley and M. L. Dorton, Stanly Association; Robert 
H. Bray, Norfolk, Va.; D. L. Pickler, Stanly Association; Rev. L. O .O'Brien, pas- 
tor First Baptist Church, Asheboro, N. C; Rev. Geo. L. Curry, pastor Denton M. 
P. Church. 

ANNUAL SERMON 

11. The annual sermon was brought by Rev. J. A. McMillan, editor of Char- 
ity and Children, Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

Adjournment for lunch. 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

12. The devotional for the afternoon session was lead by Rev. E. L. Bradley, 
pastor of the Churchland church. 

CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM 

13. The Report on Ministerial Relief was read at this time by Rev. Hoyle Love, 
pastor of the Reeds church. 

The Report on Hospitals was read by Rev. E. F. Mumford, pastor of the Lib- 
erty Church. 

Rev. Tom M. Bray, pastor of Abbotts Creek Church, read the report on 
Christian Education. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



The reports were discussed by Rev. E. F. Mumford, Rev. W. K. McGee and 
were all three adopted by the same vote. 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

As a class Christian ministers are not only not rich, but receive salaries too 
small to permit adequate provision for old age or loss of health; and in most 
cases, too small to afford many necessities even in their prime. 

To meet this situation, the Relief and Annuity Board was organized. 

This Board does not propose to enrich the ministers, but relieve them, while 
in their prime, from anxiety for themselves and their families in old age, and thus 
enable them to devote their full time and energy to the various demands of their 
pastorates. 

Last year there were 59 men and 61 women helped by this Board here in 
North Carolina. This Board received from North Carolina last year $7,253.67. The 
W. M. U. contributed $3,555.52 of this amount. $7,897.60 was appropriated by the 
Board to North Carolina last year. 

North Carolina received $553.93 more than she paid into the Board. There 
are 59 in North Carolina drawing annuities, and with these facts looking us in 
the face, and as members of our Association, v.'e should become very much con- 
cerned with the operations of the General Annuity Board; since this is the only 
agency that attempts to provide for our aged and infirm ministers and their 
widows and orphans. It may seem that the Board is concerned only for old min- 
isters, widows and orphans, but it is interested in the welfare of the churches and 
its service to their benefit. In general whatever benefits pastors also benefits 
churches. All pastors should strive to become better pastors, and all churches 
should seek to be better churches by working together for each other's good, and 
for the advancement of the kingdom of our Lord. 

Respectfully submitted, 
HOYLE LOVE 

REPORT ON NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

On May 28, 1938, the Baptist Hospital at Winston- Salem completed its fif- 
teenth year of ministry to distressed and suffering humanity. During this period 
about 40,000 patieiits entered for treatment. 

During these years the policy of the management has been to take all who 
apply if there was room, and yet of the more than 5,000 who applied for entrance 
in 1937, more than 1,000 could not be taken. Thus a need of enlargement is sug- 
gested. Last year an addition was built to the nurse's home which doubled its 
capacity. This addition was made at a cost of $28,047.50, largely provided by 
local friends. This enlargement has enabled the Hospital to expand its work in 
training young women for nurses, 48 taking training in 1937. 

Outside receipts for the year 1937 were approximately $44,000.00 coming from 
the Duke Endowment, Co-operative Program and Mother's Day offering. 

Annually there are treated about 1,700 patients who pay little or nothing. 
About 1,000 mothers are sent home annually to cheer and help their families. 
More than 100 preachers, missionaries and members of their families receive 
needed treatment— most of which is free. 

It is estimated that during 1937 the sixty-six doctors belonging to the medi- 
cal staff rendered $160,000 in free service. 

The W. M. U. has done and is doing a great work in aiding and promoting 
the work of the Hospital. Our people throughout the State are becoming mol*e 
and more interested in this part of our great program and in the near future 
we hope to see the plans of the Hospital carried out and a much larger build- 
ing well equipped and ready to serve the needy. 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. F. MUMFORD 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

In 1830 the North Carolina Baptist State Convention was organized for a 
two-fold purpose: Christian Education and Missionary Endeavor. In 1834 Wake 
Forest Institute, now Wake Forest College, was founded. For one hundred and 



10 



MINUTES OF THE 



four years this institution has trained young men for the Christian ministry and 
for Christian citizenship. 

From time to time other institutions have come into being to join hands with 
Wake Forest. In 1846, Chowan College was chartered, and has rendered noble 
service in educating young women, especially in Eastern North Carolina. Later, 
in 1856 Mars Hill opened its doors to both boys and girls in the mountains of 
Western North Carolina, with a glorious record for growth and service. In 1887 
came Buie's Creek Academy, now Campbell College, located in Central North 
Carolina with an unsurpassed growth and an unparalleled service. In 1899 Mere- 
dith College opened for education of young women. Other schools such as Win- 
gate College, Boiling Springs, although not a part of our Baptist State Conven- 
tion system, are doing fine work. 

During the past year approximately three thousand students were enrolled 
in these Christian schools. Of that number, more than one hundred and seven- 
ty young men were studying for the Gospel ministry and a number of others for 
definite Christian service. 

In addition to our State Baptist Schools we have four South-wide institu- 
tions for the education of ministers and Christian workers. At Louisville,, Ky., 
the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, also the Baptist Training School for 
Women. At Fort Worth, Texas, the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
and the Baptist Bible Institute, New Orleans, La, 

Through the years, these institutions have made their contribution to South- 
ern Baptist life and progress. And yet, there has never been a time in our his- 
tory when real vital Christian education was more needed than now. The Chris- 
tian College is dependent for life upon the church. The church draws its life 
from the Christian home. On this trinity of Divine institutions rests our future 
progress, security and happiness. "United we stand — divided we fall." 

Two thngs we Baptists must do concerning our Christian schools and col- 
leges: First, supply them with a Christian student body and contend for a fac- 
ulty who will maintain the New Testament standard of Christian ethics and 
teaching. Second, we must give these schools adequate financial support at once. 
They cannot continue to exist under present support and equipment, and main- 
tain their places in the field of education. 

Respectfully submitted, 
! I, ' TOM W. BRAY 

ADDRESS BY MRS. ISHMAEL NEGRIN 

14. Mrs. Ishmael Negrin, a missionary to Cuba, nee Miss Bessie Harrell, who 
was reared in the Mills Home, at this time brought a most inspirational address 
on conditions, religions and habits of the people of Cuba. Tears were brought to 
the eyes of the congregation as she spoke, 

SPECIAL COLLECTION FOR MRS. NEGRIN 

A special collection was taken for Mrs. Negrin, to be used in her work in 
Cuba. The amount raised was $34.00. 

REV. JAMES M. HAYES DELIVERS ADDRESS ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

15. Rev. James M. Hayes, educational representative of Meredith College and 
a former pastor at Lexington, N. C, brought a stirring and helpful address on 
Christian Education, 

STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

16. At this time Rev. J. A. Neilson brought the report on State of the Church- 
es. The report was discussed by Mr. Neilson and was adopted. 

REPORT ON THE STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

The report of the state of the churches as determined by a study of the 
church letters, is both encouraging and surprising — encouraging because we show 
an increase in every phase of our work except one; surprising because the one 
exception is the orphanage. As an association, our gifts to the orphaange de- 
creased $257.25 from v/hat we gave last year. Out of the 26 churches contributing 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



to the orphanage, 14 decreased their gifts, one gave the same as last year, while 
11 churches increased their gifts. But the increase of the 11 was not enough to 
offset the decrease of the 14 as was the case in gifts to the hospital. Out of the 
26 churches giving to the hospital this year, 13 gave less than last year, two gave 
the same, while 11 gave more. In this case, the increase was greater than the 
decrease, so that as an association, we gave $36.91 more to the hospital this year 
than we did last year. 

Our gifts to local church expenses this year show a gain of $19,036.98. Such 
a large increase is due to a great extent to the outstanding work done by the 
Denton church and its pastor, H. M. Stroup, in building this most excellent 
church auditorium in which we are now assembled. In spite of the fact that 
they raised $17,516.99 for local church expenses, as against $570.00 last year, they 
increased their gifts to missions and benevolences. 

For missions and benevolences, not including the orphanage, we report $14,- 
072.65, an increase of $1,717.65. 

Last year our per capita gifts amounted to $8.40; this year, $11.11 (if we in- 
clude Denton's building fund; this year $8.97 not including Denton's building fund.) 

This year we report 6,606 church members, a gain of 159. The churches have 
received 352 of these by baptism, 65 more tlian were reported last year. Our 
total additions show an increase of 96 over the additions last year. 

The report further shows that we gained 264 in B. T. U., 116 in W. M. U., 
and 315 in S. S. 

Every church in the association contributed to the orphanage and to the hos- 
pital, and all but two gave something to the co-operative program. 

As an association, we raised for all purposes this year, $74,623.38, a gain of 
$20,455.00. In the light of these facts, we ought to thank God and take courage. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. A. NEILSON 
DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS 

17. The letters sent up from the various churches were commented on by Rev. 
E. C. Roach. His comments were made referring to a large board displayed on 
the wall, which had been prepared by the clerk of the Association. 

18. It is voted that hereafter the reports on State of the Churches and Di- 
gest of Church Letters be consolidated to one reporter. 

RESOLUTION IN REGARD TO SUBSCRIPTIONS TO BIBLICAL RECORDER 

19. Upon motion the following resolution was adopted by the Association: 
Resolved: That the Liberty Association endorse the associational plan of sub- 
scribing in clubs to the Biblical Recorder at the time of the annual meeting of 
our Association, and that we appoint an associational representative to contact 
the churches and cooperate with the Recorder in the formation of clubs of sub- 
scriptions in every church of this Association. 

20. To carry out the above resolution; upon motion of Sam J. Smith, Rev. 
W. K. McGee, pastor of the Thomasvilie church was elected Associational Biblical 
Recorder Representative. 



THE SECOND DAY 

21. Rev. L. J. Matthews, pastor of the church at Wallburg, conducted the 
opening devotional. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

22. The committee heretofore appointed to nominated officers for next year 
made the following report, which was adopted by the Association: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1939 
We recommend to the Body the following officers for next year: 
For Moderator— R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C; For Vice Moderator— 
G. W. Miller, Lexington, N. C; For Clerk and Treasurer, Sam J. Smith, Lexing- 
ton, N. C. 

LOUIS S. GAINES, Chairman 
C. M. WALL, 
B. J. MAY, 

Committee to Nominate Officers 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION REPORT 

23. In the absence of Mrs. F. H. Wall the Report on W. M. U. was read by 
Mrs. L. S. Gaines. On motion to adopt the report was discussed by Mrs. L. S. 
Gaines, Miss Sallie McCracken and was adopted. 

W. M. U. REPORT 

In Lev. 25:10 we read these words: "Ye shall hallow the fiftieth year and 
proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof; it shall 
be a jubilee unto you." 

When Luther Rice went up and down the land lighting in the churches the 
fii-es of missions he encouraged the women who were disposed to unite in socie- 
ties to undertake the training of children. Gradually the women were led to de- 
sire fellowship in this worthy service so that in the Southland, State Central 
Committees came into being. The logical next step was uniting these State groups 
in the hope of further stimulating progress in missions. After several years of 
careful planning and prayerful encouragement, on the part of a few, in 1888 the 
organization of the Women's Missionary Union, auxiliary to the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention, was effected. 

It is in this event's memory that we celebrate the year 1938 as our Golden 
Jubilee Year. "Proclaim liberty throughout all the land." 

Because one's enthusiasm and interest must find outlet in activity and visi- 
ble results, the following goals have been set up: 
I FINANCIAL: (1) A 10% increase in the total W. M. U. gifts of 1938 over 
1937. 

(2) An additional Jubilee gift of $50,000 for the purchase of property 
and the future development of the W. M. U. Training School in Louis- 
ville, Ky. This gift is to be designated as a memorial to Miss Fannie 
E. S. Heck with the idea in mind of a continued memorial. The amount 
given through subsequent Lottie Moon Christmas offerings for the 
maintenance of Training Schools for women on Foreign Fields, which 
are not otherwise provided for, to be known as the Fannie E. S. Heck 
Memorial. 

(3) An additional Jubilee gift of $10,000 to be used for the development^ 
of the work for negro women and young people to be administered 
jointly by W. M. U. and the Women's Auxiliary of the National Bap- 
tist Convention. In considering our work among our negro neighbors, 
we might well ask the question with James Weldon Johnson: 

"How would you have us? 

As we are, or sinking 

'Neath the load we bear? 

Our eyes fixed forward on a star, 
' Or gazing empty at despair? 

Rising or falling? Men or things? 

With dragging pace, or footsteps fleet? 

Strong, willing sinews in your wings? 

Or tightening chains about your feet?" 
Perhaps one of our most challenging needs is Christian leadership 
among our negroes. 

II. ORGANIZATION AND MEMBERSHIP GOALS: A 10% increase in the num- 

ber of our organizations and members until the possibility of such en- 
largement has been reached, special emphasis being placed on no less 
of a single existing organization or active member while gaining the 
new ones. 

III. STEWARDSHIP GOAL (1) 115,000 covenant-signing-tithers by the close 

of 1938. 

(2) A major effort to promote the financial aims adopted by the Union 
as its Golden Jubilee Goals. 

IV. MISSION STUDY GOALS: (1) Emphasis upon the teaching of required 

books. 

(2) Emphasize and report mission study institutss. (We, of Liberty As- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



sociation, are happy to report 3 schools of Missions during our Jubilee 
Year ) 

(3) Promote and report pioneer classes of women and young people, who 
have never been in a mission study class before. 
V. PERSONAL SERVICE GOALS: A personal service committee in every W. 
M. U. doing directed work with the emphasis on soul- winning. (Our 
hospital and orphanage can bear witness of activity here.) 
Our Convention stepped into the Hundred Thousand Club trail a year ago, 
the trail that began in 1933 and is yet far from finished. However, our circles 
and societies are still faithfully sponsoring this worthy cause and will rejoice 
when we may sing a jubilant song of triumph in this undertaking. 

We are glad to note a decided impetus in the work among our interested and 
interesting young people. Several of our churches sent representatives to the 
House Party at Meredith this year, while at Ridgecrest, Y. W. A.'s were register- 
ed from more of our churches than ever before. Let us of the W. M. U. pledge 
ourselves anew to the task of informing and encouraging our young people to 
"carry on" in the same noble spirit that inspired those, who fifty years ago, laid 
such worthy foundations, and achieved so valiantly. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. FLETCHER H. WALL 

STATE, HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS 

24. Rev. H. M. Stroup, pastor of the Denton church, read the report on State 
Missions. 

Rev. C. D. Barringer, pastor of the Center Hill church, read the report on 
Home Missions. 

The report on Foreign Missions was read by Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, of the 
Wallburg church. The reports were adopted. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

In a minute book of the Liberty Association published sixty years ago an ar- 
ticle on State Missions has this to say, "In our Association there is only one Bap- 
tist church to every one hundred square miles; so that there are necessarily many 
communities which have not the Gospel as we understand it." This same re- 
port says there are eight missionaries under regular appointment "by the State 
Board." The writer of the report thinks "the time has come when it is safe to 
recormnend the appointment of a missionary for his full time" in our Association. 

These exerpts are given here to show two things, viz: What our forefathers 
thought of the claims of State Missions upon us, and how they went about to 
meet these needs. 

It is true that the emphasis has shifted in the last sixty years, but the needs 
are still here. Our Association is well supplied with churches, and yet, the in- 
dustrial centers are continually laying claim to an alert people. These centers are 
ever pregnant with potentialities for great churches. 

What is true in our Association is largely true with every other Association 
in the state. These needs are being met in a satisfactory way through the sev- 
eral agencies and departments of our great state mission work led so efficiently 
by our General Secretary, Mr. M. A. Huggins, and his efficient co-laborers. 

The work today finds expression in Missionary Pastoral Assistance, Teaching 
and Training through the Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Leaders, 
Church Building Aids in our educational centers, work among our negroes and 
Indians, hospitals and sanatoriums as well as the efficient work done among our 
students in our State as well as our own denominational colleges. 

In addition to this, we have two consecrated, devoted and efficient General 
Missionaries giving all their time to the work of training, enlsting and evange- 
Ism. One of these men is Rev. M. O. Alexander, located at Raleigh and the other 
is Rev. J. C. Pipes, of Asheville, N. C. These men remain on the job all the 
while and yet if their services are sought by individual churches it must be done 
far in advance so busy are they. 

Your committee is of the opinion that the time is upon us when we should 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



support State Missions more adequately. A strong home base surely bespeaks a 
better reaching out to the ends of the earth. 

Respectfully submitted, 
H. M. STROUP 

HOME MISSIONS 

Onward and upward is the key-note of heaven. In redemption God has ever 
moved forward. In one continuous sweep of progress God's purpose of redemp- 
tion unfolds and will at last find a consummation consistent with infinite love. 
All divine things rejoice in the glory of going on. 

The Home Mission Board has tasted the joy of going on in 1939. The Lord 
has richly blessed our missionaries in every field. We have now 332 missionaries 
working in 886 mission stations. During the past year 23 new mssionaries have 
been put in the field, 22 mission chapels and pastor's homes built, and over 100 
new mission stations opened, over 776,319 tracts and 34,530 Bibles and portions of 
the scriptures distributed. Fifty thousand people have been personally visited 
and talked to about their souls' salvation in addition to the people appealed to 
in the 36,579 sermons and addresses delivered. It has been a glorious year of 
going on. 

From year to year Woman's Missionary Union has shown increasing interest 
in Home Missions. Their prayers have encircled the millions of lost souls in the 
homeland and Cuba. Their gifts have maintained hundreds of missionaries in 
the field. 

Year by year the gifts have increased. In 1936 the Union gave $113,981.15. In 
1937 the offering reached the glorious sum of $130,904.86. 

Continued progress, both in increase receipts and in payments on the debt 
is plainly seen in the financial report. The Board received from all sources in 
1937, $508,454.67, an increase of $64,999.40 or 14.6%. The treasurer's report shows 
that $145,5603.7 was paid on the principal of the debt in 1937. This is the larg- 
est amount paid in any year since 1929. 

The Home Msision Board is going on. The v/ork to be done is just as im- 
portant today in bringing in the kingdom of God in the homeland and the world 
as it has ever been. In fact, the mission task in the homeland is larger, more 
difficult and more important than ever before. The work to be done is more 
vitally related to the whole task of the denomination than it has ever been at 
any time in our history. 

Therefore, in the light of modern world conditions and movements we would 
invite Southern Baptists to make a new appraisal of Home Missions and to eval- 
uate anew the importance of missions in the homeland. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. D. BARRINGER 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

It is in obedience to the command that we try to give the Gospel to those 
near us, to those in our state, to the foreigner in our midst; but he who said "Ye 
shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judea, and in Samaria" 
said also "and unto the uttermost part of the earth," and it is he whom we must 
obey. Our Foreigns Mission Board presents many encouraging facts today and 
some that are not encouraging. For the calendar year 1937 the Board received 
for its work from all sources $1,077,996.34. There was a slight decrease in our in- 
come during the first of this year as compared with the same period of time last 
year, but we are hoping that conditions become such that we shall come to the 
end of the year without a deficit. Our debt which five years ago was more than 
a million dollars has been reduced to less than one- third of a million. It is now 
$316,000. The Board has lived within its income and has not borrowed any 
money in five years. Within the past year eight new missionaries have been ap- 
pointed, five have retired, five have resigned. There has been one death — Rev. 
W. F. Hetchel, of Mexico, who passed away February 22, 1938. There are at pres- 
ent 413 missionaries in active service. In 1937 there were 14,527 baptisms. There 
are 1,802 native churches, half of which are self-supporting. 

During the past year Japan has waged wav upon China which has greatly 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



hindered our missionary activities. In some stations it has been completely sus- 
pended. The missionaries who were aged and infirm and those who were near 
the retirement age and those whose furloughs were due in 1938 were brought 
home. The Board gave every missionary the option of remaining on the field or 
returning at the expense of the Board. More than one hundred and fifty mis- 
sionaries elected to remain with their Chinese brethren and sisters through the 
terrible crisis, relieving the Board and our Government of all responsibility of 
what might happen to them. These have been in constant danger all during the 
war, but we thank God that thus far all have been kept. Surely the great faith 
of these and their willingness to suffer for Christ inspire us to our utmost sup- 
port of the cause for which they suffer. The material loss both to the Board 
and to individuals has been great and can not be fully estimated at present. 
There are no funds to replace this loss. 

Spain also has had war, but our mission work continues in a modified way. 
Our Secretary, Dr. Chas. E. Madrey, accompanied by his wife and others, has 
recently visited the African Mission. Many difficult and acute problems confront 
this mission at the present time chief among them being the desperate need for 
missionary recruits. 

And yet with all the dangers and strifes and wars the doors are open to re- 
ceive the Gospel message. In China amid the suffering there is a great turning 
to the true and living God and to Jesus the Prince of Peace. The need of sup- 
port is great. Africa calls for more teachers, more nurses, more evangelistic mis- 
sionaries. The Mexican Mission needs recruits to enter the avenue of service. 
The same call comes from the countries in Europe, Palestine and other fields. 
Shall we not enter the doors while we yet have opportunity. To do our part let 
us look upon the fields through personal contact with the missionaries, through 
our missionary periodicals into his harvest. May we be willing to go if he calls 
us to witness for him in person in these distant places; let us give liberally of 
our means to meet the needs and surely we must not forget to pray God to direct 
and bless all the work in all the places for Jesus sake. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. MASKEY M. SMITH 

MISSIONARY ADDRESS 
By Rev. L. S. Gaines 

25. At this time a missionary address was delivered by Rev. L. S. Gaines. His 
subject was "A Triumph of Christian Missions." The address touched the hearts 
of us all. 

ADDRESS BY DR. M. A. MUGGINS 

26. Dr. M. A. Huggins, State Secretary of the Baptist State Convention, de- 
livered to the Association at this time one of the best addresses delivered during 
the sessions. He stressed the financial goals and aims of our churchs and the 
duties of each church member from a standpoint of sharing his temporal bless- 
ings with God. 

COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

27. The Moderator at this time appointed the following committee on Resolu- 
tions: Rev. Louis S. Gaines, D. S. Hay worth and Charlie Teague. 

Adjournment for lunch. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Second Day 

28. The devotional was conducted by Rev. H. M. Stroup of the Denton church. 

PUBLIC MORALS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

29. The report on Public Morals and Law Enforcement was read by Rev. W. 
K. MeGee, pastor of the Thomasville church. 

The report was discussed by Rev. W. K. McGee, Rev. J. A. Neilson, Sam J. 
Smith, Rev. Hoyle Love and was adopted. 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



PUBLIC MORALS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Wte suppose that the subject assigned for this report is expected to cover in 
a brief and general way the field covered by the Social Service Commission of 
our Southern Baptist Convention. It is a large field, embracing our social, indus- 
trial, political and economic life. This report will attempt simply to indicate a 
few directions involved in this wde field. 

I— The State of Public Morals 

As to whether or not society generally is growing better or worse is not the 
question that we need to consider. Wte are agreed that any evils are abroad in 
society. And when evils are abroad, responsibility for Christian warfare falls 
upon the Christian individual and the Christian church. 

The great evil and curse of war rages in Spain and China and stands as a 
constant threat in other parts of the world. The indication is that most of the 
stronger powers of the world today are preparing for and moving toward, a great 
and terrible conflict. We have not yet learned to settle our difficulties in a 
spirit and by methods that are Christian, not even many of us who claim to be 
Christian. 

There are constant disturbances in the industrial field. This, we believe, is 
due to a desii'e for selfish and unchristian privileges and advantages, and the 
employment of selfish and unchristian methods, by persons in the different 
realms of our industrial life. 

There is a widespread disregard for civil law. This is much in evidence upon 
our highways and in our centers of population, both small and large. It is grati- 
fying to know, on the other hand, that during the past two years there has been 
a decided decrease in the number of lynchings in our country, the law being per- 
mitted to take its due course in a number of instances where in times past there 
would probably have been mob violence. 

The liquor evil, with all of its nefarious influences, seems to be growing, as 
is to be expected when government uses its influence to promote the vile trade. 
However, there are some evidences of a rising tide of sentiment against the whole 
business. But our political and social life has become contaminated by it, and 
we face a long and stubborn warfare before this beast of evil is to be defeated. 

The divorce evil has come to be a very grave one among our people. Rever- 
ence for the marriage vow and a sacred regard for the marriage relation seem to 
be completely lost by a vast proportion of our people, many of whom are in our 
churches. The general tendency among our states seems to be to tear down all 
barriers and safeguards around this divine institution. This is an evil that is 
greatly damaging to our whole social order and needs loudly to be cried out 
against by our Christian churches. We pastors need to be cautious lest we be- 
come party to the uniting in sacred marriage of persons who have violated the 
scriptures in the matter of divorce. And Christian people need to come to recog- 
nize the sanctity and permanency of the marriage relation. 

II — (The Responsibility of the Christian Citizen 

A Christian should be a careful observer of the civil law. The State should 
be able to accept those who are members of a Christian church as persons faith- 
ful to the laws of the State. The Christian should exercise his right to vote, using 
it with discretion for the election of upright, capable, and, as far as possible. 
Christian men. 

In his personal life, the Christian should refuse to indulge in any practice 
that would bring sin into his own life, or would cause him to become a stone of 
stumbling before others, either old or young. The Christian's life should be 
clean, unselfish and godly in all of its relations. 

The Christian should work for the enactment of laws that will help to en- 
courage youth in high living, help develop strong character, and promote Chris- 
tian living. He should give his full support to the enforcement of good laws, and 
especially those designed to promote upright living. He should strive with dili- 
gence for the repeal of laws that work toward the breakdown of the moral and 
social and spiritual well-being of the people. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



III— The Responsibility of the Christian Home 

We must come to recognize anew that the Christian home is basic and essen- 
tial to a vital church and to a stable society. Christian love and attitudes and 
practices must be rediscovered in our homes. This means that Christian parents 
must become Christian in their love and attitudes and relations toward each 
other and toward their children. It means that genuinely Christian example 
and training must be given in the home for the children. We would urge that 
we as parents let love and truthfulness and frankness pervade all of our home 
life. We would urge the placing of all possible good, Christian literature and art 
in our homes, and the banishment of all that is impure and vile in this realm. 
We would urge strongly the establishing of family worship in our homes, at one 
of the meals, or at some other time during each day. If the Christian home fails, 
the church and the state are going to fail. 

IV— The Root of the Whole Matter 

Our need today is for a discovery of Jesus in our individual lives, and for an 
application of the spirit and teachings of Jesus to the whole life's relations. 
Nothing else is going to meet our need. When this discovery is made and this 
application follows, then Christian life is going to become vital and Christian in- 
fluence is going to be permeating. When this is experienced deeply and widely, 
It is going to be reflected in our home life and our church life and our social life 
and our industrial life and our economic life and our political life and our inter- 
national life. This is the only hope of this groping and sinning and confused 
world. Let us set ourselves to the discovery of Him, our greatest need. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. K. McGEE 

SPECIAL COLLECTION FOR N. C. DRY FORCES 

30. At this time a special collection was taken for the North Carolina Dry 
Forces. The sum of $21.06 was raised. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS i 

31. At this time the report on Sunday Schools was read by Miss Charlotte 
Tedd, educational director of the Lexington church. The report was written by 
C. C. Wall, of Lexington, N. C. The report was discussed by Miss Tedder, Mr. 
C. M. Wall and was adopted, 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOL 

We wish to present the following report for your consideration. Following the 
period of temptation Jesus set about His life work of preaching and healing. 
Back in His home country He called His four friends to become His partners in 
His Kingdom work. They left their nets by the lake to become fishers of men. 
What a procession of disciples, men and women scattered all over the entire face 
of the earth, have left all and followed Him. May all the officers and teachers 
of our Sunday Schools be included in this number. 

We not that Jesus taught and trained His followers for three years and pre- 
pared them for their life work. After that training He called all His disciples and 
gave them the great commission. Jesus came and spake unto them saying: "All 
power is given unto me in Heaven and earth — Go ye therefore and teach all na- 
tions, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy 
Ghost, teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you, 
and Lo! I am with you always even unto the end of the world." Matthew 28, 
18 to 20 verses. 

This great commandment was given to us just the same as to the disciples 
of long ago. In a meagre way we are complying with this commandment. How- 
ever, we are reminded of the large number of church members who do not attend 
Sunday Schools, and while a great many parents who do not attend Sunday 
Schools themselves do encourage their children to go, in a great many cases 
neither parents nor children attend. With this in mind allow our committee to 
make some suggestion which we believe will greatly increase our enrollment and 
the efficientcy of our Bible Schools. 



18 



MINUTES OP THE 



The church should be very careful in selecting the best superintendent pos- 
sible. A man who is an efficient organizer and who is prepared intelligently and 
spiritually to lead his school. The above applies to the teachers as well as to 
the superintendents, and other officers of the School. We should select for 
teachers those who love humanity and who are greatly interested in evangelizing 
the world. If the teachers wish to hold the interest of their classes, they must 
bring an interesting message from God's word and also khow each student that 
they are thoroughly interested in them, not only as Sunday School teachers, but 
as friends. 

The pastor should always co-operate with the superintendent in every v/ay 
possible to make the Sunday Schools more efficient in every respect. 

The officers and teachers should take advantage of every opportunity offered 
them to become more efficient in their v/ork. They should attend the State, Dis- 
trict and Associational meetings. They should see that there is a teacher's train- 
ing meeting held in their local church from time to time. There should be a 
luncheon, or get-together meeting of all teachers and officers at least every 
month. The teacher should give much thought and prayer in preparing the les- 
sons to be taught and should feel that he or she is delivering a message from 
God and molding the minds and hearts that will tomorrow have the burden of 
carrying on church work. 

Opening exercises should be departmental and an interesting and attractive 
program should always be rendered. 

The church should be equipped with ample rooms for all classes. 

I commend the efficient work that Conrad F. Motsinger, our Associational 
Sunday School Superintendent, has done, and therefore recommend his re-elec- 
tion for the coming year. 

Let us go forward considering the great things that the Lord God has done 
for us. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. C. WALL 

REPORT ON B. T. U. 

The report on B. T. U. was read by Talbert Stroud of the Lexington church. 
Same was discussed by Talbert Stroud, Rev. L. S, Gaines, Rev. H. M. Stroup, Dr. 
M. A. Huggins and was adopted. 

REPORT ON B. T. U. 

The Baptist Training Union is made up of four divisions. Baptist Adult Union, 
Senior B. Y. P. U., Intermediate B .Y. P. U., Junior B. Y. P. U., and Story Hour. 
At the last Association it was reported that we had 12 General B. T. U. organi- 
zations with Dii-ectors, and a total number of 55 Unions, and a total B. T. U. en- 
rollment of 827. This year we report 14 general organizations with Directors, 60 
Unions, and a total enrollment of 1091. These figures show a slight increase and 
speak for themselves. 

We recommend that every church in Liberty Baptist Association sponsor and 
support the full organization and program of the Baptist Training Union. This 
organization, training our young people and adults in expressional activities, fits 
them for service with a keen sense of responsibility and knowledge of Baptist 
policy and practice. A vast majority of our leaders, under forty in Sc^uthern 
Baptist life, testify to the value of the training, the fellowship-in-service, the 
spiritual vision, and the inspiration received in their B. T. U. days. This or- 
ganization has been, and now is, of vast practical and spiritual value to our de- 
nomination. When the work is properly organized, sponsored, and led our young 
people will respond to its appeal and participate in its fruitful service. 

B. T. U. work can only succeed as it is warmly sponsored and provided for 
by the local church. The local church should, therefore, provide the necessary 
supplies and literature, and see that the Unions requiring adult leadership are 
properly manned. But there is still another vital requirement for the success of 
the B. T. U. in the local church — the fathers and mothers of the young people 
must be led to see the vital importance of the work this organization is doing. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



and they must co-operate with the leaders and workers in seeing that their boys 
and girls and young people of senior age take a proper interest in it. Too often, 
the parents are evidently indifferent to the very existence of the B. T. U., and 
in such circumstances the young people in the home cannot be expected to take 
an active interest in this vital program. 

For the last three years we have tried to maintain an active Associational 
Baptist Training Union. This was ordered by vote of Liberty Association in its 
1935 session at Mills Home Baptist church. Four quarterly meetings of this Asso- 
ciational B. T. U. were held during the year just closed with young people and 
adults present representing 13 churches, and it is an interesting fact well worthy 
of notice that the same 13 churches were represented in each of the four meet- 
ings. The 13 churches participating in our Associational B. T. U. program were: 
Erlanger, Lexington First, Sheets Memorial, Churchland, Abbotts Creek, Rich 
Fork, Southside, Carolina Avenue, Mills Home, Thomasville First, Wallburg, Den- 
ton and Lick Creek. The average attendance in these quarterly meetings was 
263. This Associational B. T. U. organization is capable of doing a fine work in 
stimulating the interest of our young people throughout the Association. Else- 
where in the "Minutes" the names of the Associational B. T. U. officers are 
listed. 

Outstanding in Associational B. T. U. activities are Lhe following churches: 
Denton, Carolina Avenue, Southside and Mills Home. 

During the coming year we hope that the other 13 churches will sponsor the 
B. T. U. and affiliate actively with the Associational B. T. U. organization by 
sending representatives to the quarterly meetings. Leaders in the churches will 
be notified of these meetings well in advance. 

Successful B. T. U. work demands intelligent, efficient, and painstaking lead- 
ership together with faithful parental co-operation. Churches without B. T. U. 
organizations are asked to permit the Associational B. T. U. workers to visit them 
and help them organize. Let us keep faithfully at this great task until every 
Baptist church in the territory of Liberty Association is actively affiliated with 
this vital program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TOLBERT I. STROUD 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 

33. The committee on Time, Place and Preached made the following report, 
which was adopted: 

We recommend to the Body the following: Time— Tuesday and Wednesday, 
September 5th and 6th, 1939; Place and Church— Wallburg Church, Wallburg, 
N. C; Preacher— Rev. H. M. Stroup, Denton, N. C; Alternate Preacher— Rev. J. 
A. Neilson, Thomasville. 

For Spring Session— Plans for this is left in the hands of the Moderator and 
Executive Committee. 

HOYLE LOVE, 

L. J. MATTHEWS, 

R. K. WILLIAMS, 

Committee on Time, Place 
and Preacher 

34. The committee on Nominations made their report which was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 
We recommend to the Body the following: 

Program Committee for 1939 the Moderator and Clerk of the Association and 

the pastor of the church entertaining the 1939 session. 

Orphanage Representative: C. M. Wall, Lexington, N. C. 

For Chairman of the Executive Promotion Committee: J. A. Neilson, Thomas- 
ville, N. C. 

To Bring Reports at Next Session: 

Baptist Hospitals: M. M. Smith, Wallburg, N. C. 

B. T. U.: Miss Charlotte Tedder, Lexington, N. C. 

Christian Education: Romulus Skaggs, Thomasville (Mills Home). 



20 



MINUTES OF THE 



Foreign Missions: Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Lexington, N. C. 

Home Missions: Mrs. John Brewer, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

Ministerial Relife: A. L. Snyder, Denton, N. C. 

Mills Home: Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C. 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement: L. A. Martin, Lexington, N. C. 

Baptist Periodicals: Rev. L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. Q. 

Digest of Church Letters and State of Churches: J. A. Neilson, Thomasville. 

State Missions: D. C. Crutchfield, Thomasville, N. C. 

Sunday Schools: Rev. L. J. Matthews, Winston -Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

W. M. U.: Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

W. K. McGEE, SAM J. SMITH, G. W. MILLER, 
Committee on Nominations 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

35. Sam J. Smith, treasurer, made the report covering the past year, which 
was adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT FOR LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 
Receipts for the 1937 Session, reported at the 1938 Session 



RECEIPTS 

Abbotts Creek $ 6.00 

Carolina Avenue 2.25 

Center Hill 2.50 

Churchland 6.00 

Denton 6.00 

Hollo ways 3.00 

Jersey 3.50 

Lexington 30.00 

Liberty 3.00 

Lick Creek 1.85 

New Friendship 8.00 

Mills Home 20.00 

Pleasant Plains 2.60 

Reeds 5.00 

Rich Fork 5.00 

Smith Grove 3.50 

Southside 3.00 

Stoners Grove 4.00 

Summerville 4.00 

Erlanger 5.00 

Wallburg 9.00 

Walters Grove 1.35 

Welcome 3.00 

Taylors Grove 1.00 

Thomasville 16.00 

Sheets Memorial 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Postage $ 6.70 



Phone Calls 



1.60 



Stationery 2.00 



Dispatch, printing 
Minutes 



110.00 



Retained for my service 
service as Clerk 30.25 



Total Receipts $150.55 Total Disbursements $150.55 

SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

36. The Committee on Resolutions of Hospitality, extends to the good people 
of the Denton church its sincere thanks and gratitude for their bountiful meals 
served us during the stay in their midst, and for the use of their church build- 
ing as a meeting place for the Association. 

We also wish to congratulate them on the erection of their beautiful and 
spacious new church. 

D. S. HAYWORTH, C. H. TEAGUE, REV. L. S. GAINES, 

Committee 

The Association adopted the above resolution by a standing vote. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



REPORT ON COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES 

37. Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor of the Erlanger church, brought the report of 
the Committee on Obituaries, which was adopted. 

In memory of those whose names appeared on the list, the Association stood 
while the list was read, and while Rev. L. S. Gaines led in a memorial prayer. 

Adjournment. 

G. W. MILLER, Vice Moderator, Presiding SAM J. SMITH, Clerk 



IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE WHO HAVE GONE 


TO THEIR REWARD SINCE OUR LAST MEETING 


"Blessed are the Dead, which die in the Lord/' Rev. 14-13. 


ABBOTTS CREEK 




Mrs. Laura Hobbs 


Mrs. D. H. Bodenheimer 




Mrs. Sarah Myers 


Mrs. Crissie J. Hayworth 




Miss Sallie Perryman 


Mrs. Nevada Idol 




Mrs. M. C. Wood 


CAROLINA AVENUE 




RICH FORK 


Mrs. Carrie Deaton 




Mr. Marshall Eddinger 


CHURCHLAND 




Mr. Cletus Leonard 


Mrs. L. E. Green 




Mr. A. M. Miller 


Mr. M. C. Barnes 




SHEETS MEMORIAL 


TIFNTON 




Mrs. J. W. Yarbrough 


IVfr T A ITpTid pr snn 




Miss Mary Gribble 


Mr. Henry L. Lanning 




SMITH GROVE 


Mrs. H. L. Gallimore 




Mr. Fred L. Clement 


Mr. K. V. Peacock 




SOUTHSIDE 


Mrs. A. S. Miller 




Mr. A. D. Barnes 


ERLANGER 




STONERS GROVE 


Dieacon R. L. Corbin 




Mr. A. D. Graves 






Mr. John Wrenn, Sr. 


Mrs. Eliza Carrick 




5STT1VriVI'¥ri?'VTT T 1? 

O IJiTXiiTltlilV V XIjIjJCj 


Mr. J. F. Beanblossom 




ivxiss vxrace jsaiiey 


Mr. Philip Leonard 




Mr. Oath Bean 


Mrs. Lizzie Hedrick 




Mrs. Ruth Bean 


LEXINGTON 




Mrs. Wyatt Davis 


Mrs. H. C. Davis 




THOMASVILLE 


Mrs. F. Lee Smith 




Mr. Paul Maley 


Mr. R. B. Miller 




Mrs. E. T. Everhart 


Mr. J. M. Bracken 




Mrs. W. K. McKee 


Deacon S. L. Owen 




Mr. W. C. Culp 


Mi*. Anderson Aaron 




WALLBURG 


LIBERTY 




Miss Rosa Smith 


Mrs. T. G. Kindley 




Deacon Roy A. Wicker 


Mr. Ivey Dorsett 




Mr. John W. Hme 


Mrs. Susan Hunt 




WALTERS GROVE 


LICK CREEK 




Mr. Fletch Loflin 


Mrs. P. M. Snider 




MILLS HOME Physician 


Mrs. W. L. D. Surratt 




Dr. R. V. Yokeley, member of 


REEDS 




M. E. Church 


Mr. J. W. Lanning 






Signed 


E. 


F. MUMFORD, 




B. 


R. CROSS, 




E. 


C. ROACH, 






Committee on Obituaries 



22 



MINUTES OP THE 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish the gospel (as 
we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the association, and to co-operate 
with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the association, 
pastors of the churches in the association, and messengers from the churches. 
Each church shall be entitled to three messengers and one additional messenger 
for every 50 members or fraction thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, vice-modera- 
tor, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected each year by the associa- 
tion at its annual meeting and shall hold office until their successors are elected. 
The duties of the officers shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in 
like organizations, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee each year 
whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached in all parts of the 
association, and to attend to all business in the association between the session 
and to make such reports as they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the 
association. The association may appoint or elect such other boards or commit- 
tees from time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually on Tuesday after the first 
Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request of the Executive Com- 
mittee change the time or the place of meeting of this association when it may 
be deemed by him not expedient to meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive Committee may 
fill any vacancy occurring between meeting of the association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular session of the 
association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of Order for 
Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 

Churches that fail to contribute to benevolences inasmuch as the Liberty 
Association has as its chief function the propagation of a missionary spirit 
among our people, and inasmuch as a church which fails to contribute to bene- 
ficences outside its local budget fails to justify its claim of being a missionary 
Baptist church, we therefore recommend that a church which contributes nothing 
to missionary objects beyond its borders have the fellowship of the association 
removed from it, if after a year from its report to the association it shows no im- 
provement in its gifts. 

See page 12, 1928 Minutes. 

DATE OF CLOSING ASSOCIATIONAL YEAR CHANGED 

In order that the committee on the Digest of Church Letters might have 
their report ready for the first day of the Association in the future, Rev. Walter 
Warfford, of Lexington, makes motion that our Association year close with the 
last Sunday in August each year, and that immediately after this date the dif- 
ferent church clerks prepare their letters and mail them to the Clerk of the As- 
sociation. 

See page 29, 1931 Minutes. 

ADVISORY BOARD OR COMMITTEE 
1. We recommend that this Executive Committee be abolished. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



That a board, to be known as the Advisory Board, be appointed by the As- 
sociation. 

1. That this board be composed of one member elected by each church in 
the Association, with the Moderator, Clerk and all pastors ex officio members. 

2. That there shall be a chairman of the board appointed from the member- 
ship thereof by the Association. 

3. That there shall be a Secretary to the board appointed from the mem- 
bership thereof by the Association. 

4. That the chairman and secretary be elected from the board and by the 
board after this year. 

5. That this board shall have the right and power to fill by appointment 
any vacancy or vacancies which may occur upon the recommendation from the 
church from which such vacancy or vacancies may occur. 

6. That this board shall be at all times subject to the Acts of the Association. 
See 1933 Minutes. 

This Board is now known as the Associational Executive Promotion Commit- 
tee. 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



WHERE HELD 



1 J amestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
J ersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting H 
Hollowaj'-s 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creelc 
Reeds X Roads 

3Big Creek 

IJamestown 
Liberty 
Hollowaj^s 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big- Creek 
2Pine Meeting- H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big- Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 

4Muddy Creek 

2Pine Meeting H 
Summerville 
Lexington 



PREACHER 



Geo. W. Puretoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
E i Carroll 
Jos'ah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 

Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stoke.s 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Re id 
C. T. Bailey 
H. AV. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H.' Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
H Morten 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
PI. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. AV. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 



CLERK 



Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter OM^en 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah AVilliams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AVilliams 
By Civil AVar 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year 



WHERE HELD 



188G 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
189 5 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 



I Abbotts Creek 
I Lick Creek 
I Reeds X Roads 
New Friendship 
Jersey 
2Pine Meeting- H 
High Point 
Kernersville 
Holloways 
Pleasant Grove 
Denton 
5Piney Grove 
Rich Fork 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lexington 
Lick Creek 
Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H 
New Friendship 
I Thoniasville 
I Wallburg 
i Denton 
I Liberty 
Orphanage 
Abbotts Creek 
Stoners Grove 
Rich Fork 
Holloways 
Center Hill 
Wallburg 
Smith Grove 
Lexington 
Denton 

New Friendship 
Churchland 
Summerville 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds 
Liberty 
Rich Fork 
Thomasville 
Holloways 
Stoners Grove 
Abbotts Creek 
Denton 
Lexington 
Lick Creek 
1 Jersey 
I Mills Home 
I Reeds 
I Churchland 
I Denton 



PREACHER 



J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J. K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 
C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 
W. A. Smith 
Geo. P. Harrill 
John R. Miller 
J. S. Farmer 
Dr. R. T. Vann 
M. L. Kesler 
S. D. Swaim 
O. A. Keller 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
M. L. Kesler 

G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
T. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler 
R. E. White 

J. S. Hardaway 
M. L. Kesler 
W. A. Hough 
W. L. Barrs 
C. H. Trueblood 
C. A. Owens 
E. N. Gardner 

H. T. Penry 
M. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 
M. L. Kesler 

M. O. Alexander 
G. A. Martin 
E. F. Mumford 
W. L. Warfford 
E. C. Roach 
J. A. Neilson 
W. K. McGee 
John A. McMillan 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
O. A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
G. W. Miller 



CLERK 



Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 

4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now Wallburg 



THE ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARY MEETINGS AND OFFICERS 
LIBERTY ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

PASTOR-ADVISOR— Rev. J. A. Neilson, Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 
DIRECTOR— Rev. L. J. Matthews, R. F. D. 5, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR— Mrs. C. M. Howell, 18 Fisher Ferry St., Thomas- 
ville, N. C. 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR— Tolbert I. Stroud, P. O. Box 542, Lexington, N. C. 
SECRETARY-TREASURER— Miss Mozelle Clinard, Thomasville, N. C. 
ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER— Miss Paula Guinn, Thomasville. 
N. C. 

CHORISTER-^Mr. L. W. Hansell, 207 Spring St., Thomasville, N. c: 
PIANIST— Mrs. Tolbert I. Stroud, P. O. Box 542, Lexington, N. C. 
ADULT LEADER— Mr. Ed Rickard, R. P. D. 1, Linwood, N. C. 
SENIOR LEADER— Mr. Howard Stinson, Thomasville, N. C. 
INTERMEDIATE LEADER— Miss Myra Or.ve, Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C 
JUNIOR LEADER— Miss Elizabeth Smith, R. F. D. 6, Lexington, N. C. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



Group Directors 

GROUP 1 (Lexington)— Mr. Francis Hunt, 223 N. Salisbury St., Lexington, N. C. 
GROUP 2 ( Thomas ville)— Miss Blanche Gantt, 18 Carmalt St., Thomasville, 
N. C. 

GROUP 3 (Denton)— Mr. Carlie Davis, Denton, N. C. 

B. T. U. ASSOCIATIONAL MEETINGS 

The October 31 1937 meeting was held with the Southside Baptist church of 
Thomasville. A total attendance of 283 from 12 churches. The churches were: 
Erlanger, Lexington First, Sheets Memorial, Churchland, Abbotts Creek, South- 
side, Carolina Avenue, Mills Home, Rich Fork, Thomasville First, Wallburg and 
Lick Creek. 

The January 30, 1938 meeting was held with the First Church, Lexington. A 
total attendance of 238 from 12 churches as follows: Erlanger, Lexington First, 
Sheets Memorial, Churchland, Southside, Carolina Avenue, Mills Home, Rich Fork, 
Thomasville First, Wallburg, Denton and Lick Creek. 

The May 30, 1938 meeting was held with th Lick Creek church, near High 
Rock. 12 churches had 263 attending. The churches represented were: Erlanger, 
Lexington First, Sheets Memorial, Abbotts Creek, Southside, Carolina Avenue, 
Mills Home, Rich Fork, Thomasville First, Wallburg, Denton and Lick Creek. 

The July 31, 1938 meeting was held with the First Church, Thomasville, 267 
delegates came from the following li2 churches: Denton, Thomasville First, Mills 
Home, Carolina Avenue, Lexington First, Sheets Memorial, Churchland, Abbotts 
Creek, Southside, Rich Fork and Wallburg. 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION OFFICERS 

President— C. F. Motsinger Rt 5 Winston-Salem 

Associate President — J. W. Dickens Rt. 6, Lexington, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Maskey M. Smith Rt. 4, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Chorister— L. W. Hansell Thomasville, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION MEETINGS 

Meetings were held as follows: At Holloways first Sunday in October, 1937; 
with nine churches represented, and a total attendance of 73 delegates. 

At Rich Fork church on first Sunday in January, 1938, with twelve churches 
represented, and a total of 70 delegates present. 

At Center Hill the first Sunday in April, 1938, with fifteen churches repre- 
sented, and a total of 110 delegates present. 

At Stoners Grove on first Sunday in July, 1938, with thirteen churches repre- 
sented, with an attendance of 60 delegates present. 

ASSOCIATIONAL W. M. U. OFFICERS AND MEETING 

Superintendent — Miss Sallie McCracken Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Superintendent— Mrs. C. M. Howell Thomasville, N. C. 

Sec -Treas.— Mrs. M. M. Smith Wlnston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 

Mission Study Chairman— Mrs. L. S. Gaines Lexington, N. C. 

Personal Service Chairman— Mrs. A. F. Warfford Lexington, N. C, R. 6 

Young People's Leader— Mrs. Ola Crowder Winston-Salem, N. C, R. 5 

Margaret Fund Chairman— Mrs. Alda Craver Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE W. M. U. OF LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Association held the 32nd annual 
meeting with Welcome Baptist church, April 27, 1938. The Superintendent, Miss 
Sallie L. McCracken, had charge of the program, the theme of which was "The 
Trumpet Calls — We Answer." The opening song was "O Worship the King." The 
devotional was conducted by Miss Roxie Sheets, who read Ps. 98 and other pas- 
sages of Scripture, made very helpful comments and let in prayer. Rev. C. C. 
Edinger, of Welcome church, gave greetings to the Union and Mrs. Raymond 
Monsees gave response, each in appropriate words. At this time, Mrs. J. Clyde 
Turner, president of the W. M. U. in North Carolina, and Mrs. C. K. Dozier, mis- 
sionary to Japan, were welcomed as visitors. Mrs. R. S. Green gave the history 



26 



MINUTES OP THE 



of the hymn for the year, "The Woman's Hymn," and spoke in tender memory 
of its author. Miss Fannie E. S. Heck. The congregation then stood and sang the 



hymn. 

Reports of officers: 

Financial Report 

Forward 1936 $ 9.65 

Received from societies 28.40 



Total $38.05 

Disbursements 

To Mrs. Eph Whisenhunt for expense $ 5.00 

To Miss Sallie McCracken for postage and other expenses 18.00 

To Mrs. Maskey M. Smith for service rendered 5.00 

To Miss Sallie McCracken for Charlotte Division expense 2.00 

Total $30.00 

Balance on hand December 31, 1937 $8.05 



MRS. MASKEY M. SMITH, Treasurer 

REPORT OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S LEADER 

Societies organized 1; letters written 20; cards sent 25; stewardship literature 
sent to all the societies. Took 3 girls to House Party at Meredith. Arranged 
transportation for boys. 

OLA CROWDER 

Personal Service Report 
The number of societies doing personal service this year 54 in 19 churches — 
an increase over last year of 7 societies, 3 churches. Number of societies doing 
personal work— W. M. S., 19; Y. W. A., 10; G. A., 10; R. A., 8; Sunbeams, 7. Kinds 
of service done — sending cards, carrying flowers and trays to sick; quilt and cloth- 
ing and other articles to orphanage; linens to Baptist Hospital; quilt and cloth- 
ing to needy families; literature to negroes; clothing negro children for Sunday 
School; holding services with the sick and shut-ins; sitting up and nursing the 
sick. 

MRS. A. F. WARFFORD, 
I Personal Service Chairman 

Report For Margaret Fund 
At present only 10 societies have reported anything for this fund. We have 
on hand $10.55 and have forwarded $2.00, making a total of $12.55 received up to 
present date. 

Miss Margie Baker is the name of our student at Mars Hill College this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. ALDA CRAVER, Chainnan 
Mission Study Report 
Number Mission Study classes held 64 in 14 churches. 

Enrollment in classes— W. M. S., 568; Y. W. A., 142; Int. G. A., 124; Jr. G. 
A., 118; Int. R. A., 35; Jr., R. A., 109; Sunbeams, 159. 

Number of seals— W. M. S., 327; Y. W. A., 68; Int. G. A., 53; Jr. G. A., 28; 
Int. R. A., 5; Jr. R. A., 20 Sunbeams, 83. 

Number of certificates— W. M. S., 73; Y. W. A., 33; G. A., 53; R. A., 24; Sun- 
beams, 55. 

Total number of certificates and seals of all kinds— W. M. S., 438; Y. W. A., 
438; Y. W. A., 104; G. A., 134; R. A., 51; Sunbeams, 138. 

MRS. LOUIS S. GAINES, 

Mission Study Chairman 

Superintendent's Message 
Our entire association seems to have entered the Jubilee Year with increasing 
interest and enthusiasm, and we are hoping and expecting to report our greatest 
year's work at the end of this, our thirty-second year. While the contributions 
amounted to a little more than for 1936, we did not quite reach our quota which 
was $4,009.00 for Co-operation Program besides the special offerings. We raised 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



$3 899 92 for this purpose; the total amount raised for the year $6,492.77. 

' The First Church of Thomasville took her place beside New Friendship as an 
A-1 Union We had 76 societies in all at the close of the year and this number 
has been increased this year by half a dozen more. Out of the 26 churches ni 
the association, 20 now have imssionary organizations. The Liberty Association 
W M U. responded beautifully to the appeal for books or money contributions 
for the Wingate Library. Contributions for the Hundred Thousand Club come 
from more than half the churches that have missionary organizations. A num- 
ber of schools of missions were held last year and we are hoping for even more 
this year and we most earnestly hope to have reports of a large number of pio- 
neer classes. 

Partial List of Contributions for the Year 1937 



Cooperative Program $3,899.92 

Home Missions 310.17 

Foreign Missions— $401.67— Lottie Moon— $625.22 1,026.89 

Hundred Thousand Club 521.25 

Hospital 191.00 

State Missions 174.93 

Training School 62.34 

Margaret Fund 59.94 

Orphanage 486.73 



Our quota for this year is $7,141.04 
Let us put forth every effort to answer the sound of the trumpet and express 
in forward steps in every line of our work the gratitude in our hearts for the 
glorious privilege of living and working in this year of Jubilee. 

SALLiE L. Mccracken 

Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Jubilee chairman, gave plans for promoting the Jubilee, 
after which the congregation sang the hymn, "This Glad Year of Jubilee." Fif- 
teen churches responded to the roll call, with a total of 115 representatives. The 
brief reports, made by the presidents of the different societies, were encouraging. 
The leading message of the morning was brought by Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, and 
it was full of helpful information and inspiration. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The afternoon session was opened with a song, after which Mrs. W. A. Shoaf 
read Ps. 150 and Rev. E. C. Roach led in prayer. Mrs. Shoaf told hurriedly of 
her visit to the Negrin's in Cuba and some of the things she learned of the mis- 
sion field there. 

The congregation was, at this time, favored with a program given by the Wel- 
come society. Following this, the Lockett and Naomi Schell G. A.'s, from Mills 
Home, gave "Parade of Progress." We were especially fortunate to have with us 
Mrs. C. K. Dozier, who spoke on the progress of the missionary work in Japan 
and of the great needs that are yet to be met. 

Mrs. I. P. Frazier led in an impressive memorial service, which included the 
following: Among the disciples at Joppa was a woman named Tabitha— which 
may be translated Dorcas— a woman whose life was full of good works and alms- 
giving, which she was doing continually. She was taken sick and died. Peter 
was at Lydda, not far distant and was sent for. So Peter arose and went with 
thme. On his arrival they took him upstairs and all the widows stood near him 
weeping and showing him the cloaks and garments which Dorcas used to make 
while she was with them. 

Several Dorcases have been taken from us this year. Each one, though dead, 
yet speaketh; they rest from their labors and their works do follow them. 

From our ranks this year, these have fallen in service: Lexington— Mrs. F. 
Lee Smith; Reeds— Mrs. Gid Sink, Mrs. Dan Hobbs, Mrs. C. A. Wood; Sheets Me- 
morial—Mrs. Jesse Yarborough; Southside, Thomasville— Mrs. Carrie Deaton, Mrs. 
Delia Goodin. 

The congregation joined in singing "Ready." 

Committee— Mrs. Hoyle Love, Miss Minnie Hayworth and Mrs. I. P. Frazier. 
A committee composed of Mrs. J. W. Tuttle, Mrs. A. L. Black, Mrs. T. O. 



28 



MINUTES OF THE 



Styers recommend Jersey for the place of meeting and the time to be the last 
of April. 

The nominating committee offer the following recommendations for officers 
of Liberty Association this coming year: 

Nominations 

Superintendent— Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thoma§ville, N. C. 
Treasurer— Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, Route 4, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Young People's Leader— Mrs. Walter L. Warfford, Lexington, N. C. 
Personal Service— Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Route 6, Lexington, N. C. 
Mission Study— Mrs. Louis S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 
Margaret Fund— Mrs. Alda Graver, Lexington, N. C. 
The nominations were accepted. 

Committee: Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Mrs. E. C. Roach, Mrs. Raymond Monsees. 
Report of Courtesy Committee 

We wish to express our thanks to our Superintendent and the officers asso- 
ciated with her for the splendid program they have given us. We are especailly 
grateful for our State President, Mrs. J. Clyde Turner and the inspiring message 
brought by her. We are also thankful to be granted the privilege of listening to 
Mrs. C. K. Dozier, a missionary to Japan— the wonderful message she brought. 
We want to thank Mrs. W. A. Shoaf of the New Friendship church for telling 
some experiences of her trip to Cuba. We appreciate the G. A.'s "Parade of 
Progress," given by Mills Home girls, and the "Golden Anniversary Meditation" 
given by the New Friendship society. We were impressed by the spirit of the 
Welcome church, as we entered this morning and we assure you we have felt at 
home throughout the day. 

We thank you for the gracious welcome and all the favors we have enjoyed, 
including the delicious lunch. We also thank you for the splendid Sunbeam dem- 
onstration. The beauty of your flowers and the many kind words have been an 
inspiration to us. The fellowship of the day will linger long with us. 

Committee: Mrs. L. E. Teague, Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Mrs. Graham Barnes. 

The program for the day closed with "Golden Anniversary Meditation," given 
in a very impressive manner by the New Friendship society. 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 

PASTORS OF THE LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

Name Address Church Member of 

Barringer, C. D., Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 2 Smith Grove 

Bradley, E. L., Spencer, N. C Churchland 

Bray, J. W., High Point, N. C, Rt. 2 Abbotts Creek 

Cox, J. A., Thomasville, N. C Carolina Avenue 

Darnell, W. C, Thomasville, N. C Southside 

Eddinger, Clyde, Welcome, N. C Welcome 

Gaines, L. S., Lexington, N. C Lexington 

Hopkins, W. B., China Grove, N. C Walters Grove 

Hunt, Howard, Denton, N. C Pleasant Plains 

Love, Hoyle, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 Reeds 

Matthews, L. J., Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 Wallburg 

McGee, W .K., Thomasville, N. C Thomasville 

Mumford, E. F., High Point, N. C, Rt. 1 Liberty 

Neilson, J. A., Thomasville, N. C Mills Home 

Pickler, J. M., "W'ingate, N. C Taylors Grove 

Roach, E. C, Erlanger, N. C. .' Erlanger 

Stroup, H. M., Denton, N. C Denton 

ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE ASSOCIATION 
WHO ARE NOT PASTORS 

Name Church Member of Address 

Caldwell, R. N. (Retired) Taylors Grove New London, N. C. 

Clark, P. B. (Inactive) Walters Grove Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



Gallimore, Arthur (Missionary) Lexington , 

Jarrett, J. F. (Inactive) Center Hill 

Lanning, Otis (Student) Lexington 

McMillan, J. A. (Editor C. & C.) Mills Home 

Newton, J. D., (Retired) Thomasville 

Summey, J. A. (Retired) Jersey 



Canton, China 

.Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Lexington, N. C. 

Thomasville, N. C. 

Thomasville, N. C. 

.Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 



ASSISTANT PASTORS AND EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 

Miss Charlotte Tedder, Educational Director, First Baptist Church, Lexing- 
ton, N. C. 

No church has an assistant pastor. 

CHURCH B. T. U. PRESIDENTS, LEADERS AND PRESIDENTS 

ABBOTTS CREEK— Pres. Sr. Union, Paul Hay worth, Kernersville, N. C, Rt. 
1; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. Daisy Spurgeon, High Point, N. C, Rt. 2; Leader Jr. 
Union, Miss Mary Hedgecock, Kernersville, N. C, Rt. L 

CAROLINA AVENUE— B. T. U. Director, Joe Ingram; Pres. Sr. Union, Gene 
Smith; Leader Int. Union, Dewey Lyndon; Leader Jr. Union, Miss Pauline Gilliam, 
Thomasville, N. C. 

CENTER HILL — B. T. U. Director, J. B. Helms, Linwood, N. C; Pres. Sr. 
Union, Ulus Hunt, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

CHURCHLAND— B. T. U. Director, L. E. Rickard, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1; Pres. 

B. A. U., S. L. Allred, Linwood, N. C„ Rt. 1; Pres. Sr. Union, Foy Beck, Lexing- 
ton, N. C, Rt. 5; Leader Int. Union, Gilmer Beck, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5; Lead- 
er Jr. Union, Mrs. John Brewer, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

DENTON— Director, Ross Henderson; Pres. B. A. U., J. L. Snider; Pres. Sr 
Union, R. C. Wall; Leader Int. Union, Mrs. H. M. Stroup; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. 
Ben Carroll; Leader Story Hour, Mrs. Carlie Davis, P. O. of all, Denton, N. C. 

ERLANGER— Director, Dozier Linder; Pres. B. A. U., R. H. Shytle; Leader 
Int. Union, Mrs. Dozier Linder; Leader Jr. Unions, Mrs. E. C. Roach and Mrs. E. 

C, Haynes; Leader Story Hour, Mrs. E. C. Putnam, P. O. of all, Erlanger, N. C. 

JERSEY— Pres. Sr. Union, Harold Tate, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

LEXINGTON— Director, Miss Charlotte Tedder; Pres. B. A. U., Mrs. E. O. 
Webster; Pres. Sr. Union, Francis Hunt; Leader Int. Union, H. B. Tucker; Leader 
Jr. Union, Mrs. T. I. Stroud; Leader Story Hour, Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, P. O. of 
all, Lexington, N. C. 

LIBERTY— Director, N. F. Hooker; Pres. B. A. U., L. V. Miller; Pres. Sr. 
Union, Dewey Adams; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. N. F. Hooker; P. O. of all, Thom- 
asville, N. C, Rt. 2. 

LICK CREEK— Director, Mrs. Z. L. Morgan. High Rock, N. C; Leader Int. 
Union, Mrs. Z. L. Morgan; Pres. B. A. U., Rachel Snider, Denton, N. C, Rt. 1. 

MILLS HOME-^Pres. Senior B. Y. P. U., Franklin Bailey; Leader Int. B. Y. 
P. U., Miss Myra Olive; Leader Int. B. Y. P. U., Mrs. Romulus Skaggs; Leader 
Int. B. Y. P. U., Miss Delia Stroupe; Leader Jr. B. Y. P. U., Miss Edith Hayes; 
Leader Jr. B. Y. P. U, Miss Ethel Johnson; Leader Jr. B. Y. P. U., Miss Lydia 
Beavers; Leader Jr. B. Y. P. U., Mr. Paul Edinger. 

REEDS— Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. G. F. Koonts, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

RICH FORK — Director, Hannah Eddinger; Pres. Sr. Union, Caryles Eddinger; 
Leader Int. Union, Miss Mozelle Clinard; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. Conrad Myers, 
P. O. of all, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Director, Ernest Miller; Pres. Sr. Union, John Cra- 
ven; Leader Int. Union, Mock Hedrick; Leader Jr. Union, Nora Lee Byards. P. O. 
of all, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

SOUTHSIDE— Dii-ector, Miss Paula Guins; Pres. Sr. Union, Sherman Hub- 
bard; Leader Int. Union, Miss Ruby Embry; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. W. C. Dar- 
nell; Leader Story Hour, Miss Clettie Fry, P. O. of all, Thomasville, N. C. 

THOMASVILLE— Director, Mrs. C. M. Howell; Pres. Sr. Union, Miss Nellie 
Bray; Leader Int. Union, Miss Ruby Connell and L. E. Teague; Leaders, Blanche 
Gantt, Russell Sanders, Evelyn Dameron; Leader Story Hour, Mrs. Raymond 
Boaze, P. O. of all, Thomasville, N. C. 



30 



MINUTES OP THE 



WALLBURG— Director, Miss Etta Teague; Pres. Sr. Union, Ray Rothrock; 
Leader Int. Union, Miss Clara Pardue; Leader Jr. Union, Mrs. C. I. Crook. 

CHURCH W. M. U. PRESIDENTS 

ABBOTTS CREEK— Miss Minnie Hayworth, High Point, N. C, Rt. 2. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. Willie Gilliam, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCHLAND — Mrs. Graham Barnes, Lmwood, N." C, Rt. 1. 

DENTON— Mrs. Will T. Harris, Denton, N. C, Rt. 1. 

ERLANGER— Mrs. L. A. Carswell, Erlanger, N. C. 

HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. T. O. Styers, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

JERSEY— Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Lexington, N. C. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. T. A. Slate, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2. 

MILLS HOME — ^Miss Jennie Ballard, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Winston -Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

REEDS— Mrs. Alda Craver, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

RICH FORK— Mrs. W. M. Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. Broadus Smith, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. W. C. Darnell, Thomasville, N. C. 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. Ramon Monsees, Southmont, N. C. 

THOMASVILLE— Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 

WALLBURG— Miss Etta Teague. Wallburg, N. C. 

WELCOME— Mrs. T. H. Mills, Welcome, N. C. 

CHURCH Y. W. A. COUNSELORS 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. J. A. Cox, Thomasville, N. C. 

DENTON— Mrs. Carlie Davis, Denton, N. C. 

ERLANGEI^-Mrs. E. C. Putnam, Erlanger, N. C. 

HOLLOWAYS— Miss Elva Crook, Lexington, N. C. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. C. C. Wall, Lexington, N. C. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. Austin Sink, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2. 

MILLS HOME— Miss Mabel Bean, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. Geo. Nading, Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. Rose Frady, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 

THOMASVILLE— Miss Edith Hillian, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCH G. A. LEADERS 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Miss Ethel Carter, Thomasville, N. C. 

DENTON— Mrs. H. M. Stroup, Denton, N. C. 

ERLANGER— Mrs. Artie Lindsay, Erlanger, N. C. 

HOLLOWAYS— Miss Dot McCarn, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. C. R. Sharpe and Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Lexington, N. C. 

MILLS HOME— Miss Beatrice Council, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP- Mrs. Clyde Carroll and Miss Lelia Swaim, Winston- 
Salem, N. C, R. 5. 

REEDS— Mrs. Hoyle Love, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 
RICH PORK— Miss Mozelle Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. Hoyt Williams, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. Clyde Suggs, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. A. P. Warfford, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
THOMASVILLE— iMrs. J. L. Ferryman, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCH R. A. LEADERS 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Miss Pauline Carter, Thomasville, N. C. 
ERLANGER— Mrs. C. C. Church, Erlanger, N. C. 
HOLLOWAYS— Miss Grace Palmer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
LEXINGTON — Mrs. Spaugh Thomason, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5. 
MILLS HOME— Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Thomasville, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mrs. Dick Newman and Wiley Doby, Winston- Salem, 
N. C, Rt. 5. 

REEDS— Mrs. Walser Mize, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



STONERS GROVE— Mrs. J. L. Thomason, Southmont, N. C. 
THOMAS VILLE— Miss Blanche Gantt, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCH SUNBEAM LEADERS 
CAROLINA AVENUE— Miss Hattie Lane McKaskill, Thomasville, N. C. 
ERLANGER— Mrs. Artie Lindsay, Erlanger, N. C. 
HOLLOWAYS^Mrs. G. C. Palmer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6. 
JERSEY— Miss Sadie Sharpe, Linwood, N. C. 
LEXINGTON— Mrs. Roy Sheffield, Lexington, N. C. 
MILLS HOME— Mrs. J. A. Neilson, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Miss Hazel Kiger, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5. 
REEDS— Mrs. I. P. Myers, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 
RICH FORK— Miss Vera Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 
STONERS GROVE— Miss Pauline Peacock, Southmont. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. Wakefield Stone, Thomasville, N. C. 
WELCOME— Miss Elizabeth Disher, Welcome, N. C. 

CHOIR DIRECTORS OR LEADERS OF LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

ABBOTTS CREEK— J. P. Traynham, High Point, N. C, Rt. 2. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Willie Gilliam, Thomasville, N. C. 

CHURCHLAND— Foy Beck, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5. 

LEXINGTON— Miss Louise Martin, Lexington, N. C. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. Lois Sink, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Robert Kandman, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4. 

REEDS— Everett Fritts, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 

STONERS GROVE— Miss Ruth Hollis, Southmont, N. C. 

SUMMERVILLE— Mrs. W. H. Carrick, Denton, N. C. 

TAYLORS GROVE— Mrs. J. K. Woodard, New London, N. C, Rt. 2. 

WALTERS GROVE— E. R. Klass, Cid, N. C. 

Names not given from other churches. 

LEADERS OF CHURCH BROTHERHOODS 

No church in the Association has an organized brotherhood. 



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Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
1939 



One Hundred and Seventh Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

Wallburg Baptist Church 

WALLBURG, N. C. 
September 54i and 64ii, I939 



The next Session will be held September 3-4^ I940 with the 
Center Hill Baptist Church, Lexington, 
N. C, R. F. D. No. 6 



Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
1939 



One Hundred and Seventh Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

Wallburg Baptist Church 

WALLBURG, N. C 
September 5+h and 6th, 1 939 



The next Session will be held September 3-4^ I940 with the 
Center Hill Baptist Church, Lexington, 
N. C, R. F. D. No. 6 



INDEX 



Addresses 20-21-22-25 

Appointment of Committees 13 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 37 

Auxiliaries— Associational 27 to 35 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 4 

Biblical Recorder Representative 19 

Church Clerks 44 

Church Directories 37 

Church Treasurers 45 

Committees: Promotion Executive 3-26 

On Nomination 13 

Finance 13 

Program for 1940 19 

To Report for 1940 Chairman 26 

On Time, Place and Preacher 13 

Standing 3 

Constitution and By-Laws 6 

Deceased Members 36 

Directories: Associational 3 

Church 37 

B. Y. P. U 4 

Ordained Ministers 37 

W. M. U 36 

Election of Officers 19 

Historical Table 47-48 

Messengers 5 

Order of Business 8 

Orphanage Representative 19 

Pastors of Association 37-40 

Proceedings, Associational 8 

Reports: Baptist Periodicals 9 

Committee on Obituaries 27 

B. T. U 12 

Committee on Resolutions 25 

Committee on Nominations 26 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 25 

Digest of Church Letter 18 

Foreign Missions 16 

Hospitals 20 

Education 19 

Mills Home 23 

Home Missions 14 

Ministerial Relief 17 

Public Morals 23 

Sunday Schools 11 

Treasurer's 25 

W. M. U. Work 22 

Resolutions 25 

Statistical Tables 40 

Sermon, Annual 14 

Special Collections 21 

Sunday School Superintendents 41 

Visitors 13 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries, Officers and Meetings 38 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 



DIRECTORY OF ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

R. D. Covington, Moderator Thomas ville, N. C. 

G. W. Miller, Vice Moderator Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Treasurer Lexington, N. C. 



PROMOTION— EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Name Church — Address 

Rev. J. A, Neilson, Chairman Mills Home — Thomasville, N. C. 

J. P. Traynham Abbotts Creek, High Point, N. C. 

B. L. Bostic Carolina Ave., Thomasville, N. C. 

B. J. May Liberty, Lexington, Rt. 2 

Millard Wilson Reid Street, Thomasville, N. C. 

Wilford Eddinger Rich Fork, Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 1 

W. E. Anderson Sheets Memorial, Lexington, N. C. 

Clyde Suggs Southside, Thomasville, N. C. 

L. E. Lookabill Stoners Grove, Southmont, N. C. 

A. L. Snider Denton, Denton, N. C. 

L. E. Teague Thomasville, Thomasville, N. C. 

I. G. Greer Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

T. M. Lambeth New Friendship, W.-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 

Roy, Owens Taylors Grove, New London, N. C. Rt. 2 

J. W. Dickens, Jr Holioways, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

J. W. Tuttle Wallburg, Wallburg, N. C. 

E. C. Haynes Erlanger, Erlanger, N. C. 

E. S. Craver Welcome, Welcome, N. C. 

W. H. Lomax Churchland, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

E. R. Klass Walters Grove, Cid, N. C. 

Grady Clement Smith Grove, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

C. M. Wall; Sr Lexington, Lexington, N. C. 

J. F. Foster Reeds, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 



ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY OR OTHER PAID EMPLOYEE 

None 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

None. 

ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
W. M. U. Convention 

Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Superintendent Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. C. M. Howell, Associate Supt Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. N. C. Teague, Young People's Leader Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Personal Service Chrm Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Mission Study Chrm Lexington, N. C. 

Annual Meeting was held April 12, 1939. See Page 27. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION 

Conrad F. Motsinger, Superintendent Rt. 5, W.-Salem, N. C. 

J. W. Dickens, Jr., Associate Supt Lexington, N. C. 

Maskey M. Smith, Sec'y & Treas Rt. 4, W.-Salem, N. C. 

Meeting held July 2, 1939. See Page 33. 



4 



MINUTES OF THE 



B. T. U. CONVENTION 



W. R. Eddinger, Director Thomasville, N. C. 

Miss Myra Olive, Associate Director , Thomasville, N. C. 

Miss Rubye Connell, Secretary & Treasurer Thomasville, N, C. 

Fred Golightly, Choister Lexington, N. C. 

Miss Ella Mae Pegg, Pianist Thomasville, N. C. 

Miss Eula Mae Snider, Asst. Pianist Denton, N. C. 

Rev. H. M. Stroupe, Pastor Ad\dser Denton, N. C. 

Miss Etta Teague, Adult Leader Wallburg, N. C. 

Miss Bettie Claire Jennings, Senior Leader Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. Z. L. Morgan, Intermediate Leader High Rock, N. C. 

Mrs. John Brewer, Junior Leader Linwood, N. C. 



Annual Meeting held' April 27, 1939. See Page 34. 

ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE BROTHERHOOD 

None. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE BOUNDS 
OF THE ASSOCIATION 
The Mills Home 
Thonnasville, N. C. 

I. G. Greer, General Supt Thomasville, N. C. 

B. W. Spillman, Chairman Kinston, N, C. 

R. D. Covington, Treasure. Thomasville, N. C. 



OFFICERS BAPTIST SCHOOLS STATE BOARDS 
AND INSTITUTIONS 
Residing" Within the Assaciation 



Louis S. Gaines, Member General Board Lexington, N. C. 

Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C. 

Mrs. Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C. 

W. K. McGee, Trustee Baptist Hospital Thomasville, N. C. 

C. M. Wall, Sr., Trustee Mars Hill College Lexington, N. C. 

Dr. C. R. Sharpe, Trustee Wake Forest College Lexington, N. C. 

J. A. McMillan, Trustee Wake Forest College Thomasville, N. C. 



SPECIAL INFORMATION 

Rev. W. K. McGee, Associational Representative 

Biblical Recorder Thomasville, N. C. 

C. M. Wall, Sr., Associational Representative The 

Mills Home Lexington, N. C, 

Associational Representative of the Baptist Hospital; None 
Associational Woman's Auxiliary; This organization meets an- 
nually, but not with and at the samel time of the Association. The 
proceedings of their 1939 meeting are found on Page 27. 

Associational Sunday School and B. T. U. Conventions. These 
organizations do not meet at the same time and with The Association. 
The proceedings of their 1939 Meetings will be found on Pages 33 
and 34, respectively. 

LIST OF MESSENGERS 
ABBOTTS CREEK — Carey Davis, Mrs. Cleta Bodenheimer, Mrs. Ora 
Spurgeon 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSiOCIATION 



CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. A. L. Gordon, Willa Dae Gordon, Pauline 
Carter. 

CENTER HILL— Ulus Hunt, Miss Troy Jarrett, Mrs. Will Owen 
CHURCHLAND— Glen Barnes, Paul Kesler, Mrs. Graham Barnes, 

Mrs. John Brewer 
DENTON— A. L. Snider, Mrs. Ben Carroll, Mrs. V. K. Skeen, Mrs. 

Floyd Coggins. 

ERLANGER — Mrs. E. C. Roach, Mrs. B. L. Hames, Marvin Perkins 
HOLLOWiAYS— B. R. Cross, Miss Ida Beanblossom, J. A. McCarn 
JERSEY— John Penninger, Jr., Reed Smith, R. A. Tate 
LEXINGTON— Sam J. Smith, G. W. Miller, C. M. Wall, Miss Helen 
Smith, Miss Charlotte Tedder, L. A. Martin, Miss Addie 
Wallace, Miss Roxie Sheets, Mrs. Charles R. Red- 
wine, Mrs. C. M. Wall, Dr. F. G. Johnson, P. A. Myres,, Sr., 
R. L. Green, Mrs. W. J. Lancaster, Rev. L. S. Gaines, Mrs. 
L. S. Gaines, C. C. Wall, Mrs. P. A. Myres, Mrs. Sam J. 
Smith, John B. Lane, S. H. Cross 
LIBERTY— Mrs. B. J. May, Mrs. T. A. Slate, O. F. Hughes, H. P. May 
LICK CREEK — Lindsey Feezor, Mrs. B. C. Cole, Mrs. A. W. Feezor 
MILLS HOME— W. B. Loyd, Paul S. Keys, Mrs. Thelma Mellons, 
Miss Viola Hester, Miss Myra Olive, C. A. Kearns, W. P. 
Eddinger, Mrs. Lettie Brittain 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Raymond Wilson, Mrs. George Swaim, Mrs. 
S. O. Hinkle 

OAK HILL MEMORIAL— K. C. Lambeth, Mrs. Ray Underwood, 
Mrs. Pearl Fuller 

PLEASANT PLAINS— W. H. Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. Fate Loflin, Mrs. 
Adam Newson, William Carroll 

REID STREET— Rev. H. O. Lanning, Mrs. S. A. Renegar, Mrs. Mil- 
lard Wilson 

REEDS— J. H. Foster, Arlie Myers, Mrs. Alda Craver 
RICH FORK— Willie Bowers, Mrs. Jacob Kanoy, Hill Myers 
SHEET SI MEMORIAL-^Spurgeon Ayers, Otis Frank, Mrs. Chas. 

Young, Mrs. J. J. Carrick, J. J. Carrick, Mrs. J. H. Guffy, 

Mrs. Lindsey McCarn, Mrs. Z. Fullbright 
SMITH GROVE— E. W. Koonts, Mrs. E. W. Koonts, T. E. Lassiter 
SOUTHSIDE— Maurice Parker, Edd Epps, Mrs. T. O. Mauldin, Mrs. 

N. F. Britt 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Miss Francis Beckner, Mr. 

and Mrs. Joe Long 
SUMMERVILLE— George Tysinger, Lucy Tysinger, Mrs. Essie Davis, 

Edna Bean 

TAYLORS GROVE— Roy Owens, J. R. Woodard, Adam Cranford 
THOMASVILLE FIRST— Mrs. R. S. Green, Mrs. C. L. Berrier, Miss 

Florence McWilliams, Mrs. Lacy Dameron, Mrs. Ruby Boaz, 

Mrs. Paul Mailey, Mrs. C. M. Howell, L. W. Hansell, L. E. 

Teague, Mrs. Milton Jones, A. Z. Bales 
WALLBURG— William King, H. F. Pardue. Mrs. Maskey M. Smith. 
WALTERS GROVE— Mr. and Mrs. Carl Gallimore, Mr. and Mrs. 

J. A. Gallimore, Miss Arvls Gallimore, Mr. and Mrs. E. R. 

Klass 

WELCOME^M. L. Craver, Mrs. T. H. Mills, Mrs. B. R. Zimmerman, 

Mrs. C. S. Haynes 
OiAK GROVE SUNDAY SCHOOL— Mrs. Roscoe Kearns, John Hed- 

rick, Miss Florence Hedrlck 



6 



MINUTES OF THE 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish 
the gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the 
association, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 
MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the 
association, pastors of the churches in the association, and messen- 
gers from the churches. Each shall be entitled to three messengers 
and one additional messenger for every 50 members or fraction 
thereof over and above 100 member 

OFFICERS 

Article. 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, 
vice-moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected 
each year by thd association at its annual meeting and shall hold 
office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in like organiza- 
tions, or as defined by the association from time to time. 
BOARD AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee 
each year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel 
preached in all parts of the association, and to attend to all business 
in the association between the session and to make such reports as 
they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the association. The 
association may appoint or elect such other boards or committees 
from time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually on Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request 
of the Executive Committee change the time or the place of meeting 
of this association v/hen it may be deemed by him not expedint to 
meet at the timei or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive 
Committee may fill any vacancy occurring between meeting of the 
association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article. 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular 
session of the association by a two-thirds vote of the number present, 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
Order for Parliamentary Authority. 

STANDING RESOLUTIONS 
CHURCHES NOT CONTRIBUTING TO BENEVOLENCES 

Churches that fail to contribute to benevolences inasmuch as the 
Liberty Association has as its chief function the propagation of a 
missionary spirit among our people, and inasmuch as a church which 
fails to contribute to beneficences outside its local budget fails to 
justify its claim of being a missionary Baptist church, we therefore 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



recommend that a church which contributes nothing to missionary 
objects beyond its borders have the fellowship of the association 
removed from it, if after a year from its report to the associaton it 
shows no improvement in its gifts. 
See page 12, 1928 Minutes. 

DATE OF CLOSING ASSOCIATIONAL YEAR CHANGED 

In order that the committee on the Digest of Church Letters 
might have their report ready for the first day of the Association in 
the future, Rev. Walter Warfford, of Lexington, makes motion that 
our Association year close with the last Sunday in August each year, 
and that immediately after this date the different church clerks 
prepare their letters and mail them to the Clerk of the Association. 

See page 29, 1931 Minutes. 

ADVISORY BOARD OR COMMITTEE 

We recommend that this Executive Committee be abolished. 

That a board, to be known .as the Advisory Board, be appointed 
by the Association. 

1. That this board be composed of one member elected by each 
church in the Association, with the Moderator, Clerk and all pastors 
ex officio, members. 

2. That there shall be a chairman of the board appointed from 
the membership thereof by the Association. 

3. That there shall be a Secretary to the board appointed from 
the membership thereof by the Association. 

4. That the chairman and secretary be elected from the board 
and by the board after this year. 

5. That this board shall have the right and power to fill by 
appointment any vacancy or vacancies which may occur upon the 
recommendation from the church from which such vacancy or 
vacancies may occur. 

6. That this board shall be at all times subject to the Acts of 
the Association. See 1933 Minutes. 

This board is now known as the Associational Executive Promo- 
tion Committee. 



8 



MINUTES OF THE 



PROCEEDINGS , 

OP THE 

ONE HUNDRED SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 
WALLBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Wallburg, North Carolina 
Sept. 5th and 6th, 1939 



TUESDAY 

MORNING SESSION, SEPT. 5, 1939 

1. On Tuesday, September 5, 1939, The Liberty Baptist Associa- 
tion assembled in the One Hundred Seventh Annual Session, with 
the Wallburg Baptist Church at Wallburg, N. C. 

2. Rev. L. J. Matthews, pastor of the host church, after the 
singing of "All Hail The Power of Jesus' Name" and "My Faith 
Looks Up to Thee", led in the opening Devotional. 

3. At 10:10 A. M. R. D. Covington, Moderator, called The Asso- 
ciation to the transaction of business. 

4. R. D. Covington thanked the Association for flowers and 
resolution of sympathy sent him last year when he was in the 
hospital at the time of the meeting of the Body. 

REPORT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

5. The report of the Program Committee was read by Sam 
J. Smith. Same was adopted as read. 



FIRST DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. L. J. Matthews 

10:00 Report of Program Committe Sam J. Smith 

10:10 Religious Literature Rev. L. S. Gaines 

10:30 Sunday Schools Rev. L. J. Matthews 

11:00 B. T. U Miss Charlotte Tedder 

11:15 Roll Call; Recognition of New Pastors and Visitors; Appoint- 
ment of Committees by the Moderator 

11:40 Annual Sermon Rev. H. M. Stroup 

12:30 Lunch 

AFTERNOON 

2:00 Praise and Worship Rev. N. C. Teague 

2:15 Co-operative Program 

1. State Missions D. C. Crutchfield 

2. Home Missions Mrs, John Brewer 

3. Foreign Missions Mrs. P. M. Hendricks 

4. Ministerial Relief A. L. Snider 

2:45 Address Perry Crouch 

3:30 State of Churches 

1. Digest of Church Letters (Blackboard) 

2. Associational Goals for 1940 Rev. J. A. Neilson 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



SECOND DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. N. P. Britf 

10:00 Election of Officers and Business 

10:15 Christian Education Romulus Skaggs 

10:20 Address Hoyt Blackwell, Pres. Mars Hill College 

11:00 Co-operative Program 

1. Baptist Hospitals M. M. Smith 

11:30 Address Rev. A. R. Gallimore, Missionary from China 

12:15 Lunch 

AFTERNOON 

1:45 Praise and Worship Rev. Otis Lanning 

2:00 Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. A. F. Warford 

2:30 Public Morals and Law Enforcement Hon, L. A, Martin 

3:00 Mills Home Mrs. C. M. Howell 

3:30 Report of Committees, etc. 

R. D. Covington, Moderator 
G. W. Miller, Vice-Moderator 
Sam J. Smith, Clerk and Treas. 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

6. The report on Christian Literature was brought by Rev. L. S. 
Gaines. The report was discussed by Rev. L. S. Gaines, Rev. W. K. 
McGee, and was adopted. 

REPORT ON RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

Presented at the 107th Annual Session of Liberty Baptist Asso- 
ciation, Meeting with The Wallburg Baptist Church, Tuesday and 
Wednesday, September 5-6, 1939. 

The "Religious Literature" which comes within the scope of this 
report is the CHRISTIAN Literature in pamphlet and magazine 
form which is distributed to subscribers either by the week, month, 
or quarter. This literature is circulated for the purpose of furnishing 
spiritual and moral enlightenment, disseminaton of denominational 
news, indoctrination of our people, and the promulgation of the 
Christian Enterprise as we believe it is incumbent upon us to carry 
it out to the uttermost parts of the earth. 

The Sunday School and B. T. U. reports will, doubtless, have 
something to say about the literature prepared by the Sunday School 
Board designed to facilitate the work of teaching and training in 
our Churches. Our Southern Baptist teaching and training litera- 
ture in the form of lesson quarterlies, magazines, and study course 
textbooks is of the highest order, and qualified experts have testified 
that no denomination on earth is furnishing better literature to its 
constituents than the Southern Baptist Sunday School Board. 

In former years this report has dealt almost exclusively with our 
North Carolina Baptist Paper, The Biblical Recorder. This year we 
would call attention to several worthy Baptist publications that ought 
to be on the reading tables in our Baptist homes. "Charity and 
Children", the publication of our Baptist Orphanage at Mills Home, 
along with "The Biblical Recorder" our Baptist State Paper, are 
weeklies that should be in every Baptist home because of their news 
and inspirational value. Through the pages of these papers Baptists 
may keep step with the progress in all the areas of our Christian 
interests at home and abroad. "The Next Step in the Churches", a 



10 



MINUTES OF THE 



monthly pamphlet on Adult Christian Education edited and published 
for the Steward League by Dr. Walt N. Johnson, is informative, in- 
triguing, and challenging. "Southern Baptist Home Missions", pub- 
lished by our Home Mission Board in Atlanta, is highly recommended 
as an up-to-date missionary journal telling of the opportunities and 
triumphs of the Gospel in our vast Home Mission Field. "The Com- 
mission", monthly magazine issued by the Foreign Mission Board 
in Richmond is a Baptist world journal of Missions, fascinatingly 
portraying the work Baptists of the Southern Convention are doing 
in all parts of the globe. And to those who desire to keep in touch 
with the world-wide interests of all Baptists of all the Conventions 
there is the National Baptist Paper, "The Watchman-Examiner", 
published weekly in New York. Of special interest to the women of 
the W. M. U., are the fine periodicals issued by the W. M. U. of 
the Southern Baptist Convention, "Royal Service", a magazine con- 
taining program and devotional material, in scope covering the en- 
tire field of Southern Baptist Missionary interest. Published also 
by the W. M. U. of the Southern Convention is "The Window", a 
monthly missionary magazine of special interest to members of 
our Young Women's Auxiliaries, and "World Comrades", another fine 
missionary magazine designed for the Girls' Auxilaries, Royal Am- 
bassadors, and Sunbeams. 

All of these periodicals together with the special periodicals 
issued by the Sunday School Board in the Teaching and Training 
Departments, are worthy of our support. In fact, they cannot exist 
and render the fine service of which they are capable unless we 
support them with our subscriptions. 

Our Baptist churches— Christian democracies — cannot flourish 
without intelligence of Baptist "distinctives", ways, and work. Our 
progress as a great Christian Denomination is in no small way in- 
fluenced by our reading. We must be a reading people and our 
reading must consist in no small part of Baptist publications which 
are carefully designed to furnish us with up-to-date information in- 
terestingly, inspiringly and challengingly written, and artistically 
typographed. 

The "Biblical Recorder" is now owned and published by the 
North Carolina Baptist State Convention. It is OUR Baptist Paper. 
We should feel free to contribute to its worthy sermonic material, 
inspirational articles, news items, and challenging reports of victori- 
ous enterprises. We should subscribe to our State Paper and read 
its pages week by week. We should feel free also to offer construc- 
tive criticisms to the publishers when we feel that such criticisms 
may suggest improvement. 

The following CONSTRUCTIVE criticism is offered in this re- 
port and may be considered separately by this Association as a 
memorial to The Biblical Recorder— a suggestion in which many 
have concurred upon recent discussions as to how our State Paper 
might be made more attractive: 

(1) That a paper of heavier grade be used and the size be cut 
down to 12y2"x9," and that the paper be folded lengthwise 
for mailing. 

(2) That the paper be made 24 pages in length, whereas it is 
now 16 pages in length. 

(3) That the typing be enlarged and spaced wider between the 
lines. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



I 

11 



(4) That the length of articles be greatly reduced; that the 
double S. S. and B. T. U. page be retained as a permanent 
feature. 

(5) That the department entitled "Current Topics", be left en- 
tirely out of the paper inasmuch as nowadays practically 
every family has access to current newspapers and magazines 
which furnish an abundance of current news material. 

(6) That all patent medicine ads be eliminated from the pages 
of our Baptist State Paper. 

Many of us believe that these changes would greatly improve 
the mechanical make-up of our paper and enhance its attractiveness, 
and secure for it a much wider reading by all classes of our people 
— young and old. The Biblical Recorder should champion all of our 
Baptist "causes" with vigor, with scintillating and penetrating in- 
terest, and BREVITY. And we should support it 100 per cent with 
our yearly subscriptions and our faithful weekly reading. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS S. GAINES, 
Pastor, First Baptist Church, 
Lexington, North Carolina. 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

7. The report on Sunday Schools was brought by Rev. L. J, Mat- 
thews. The report was discussed by John B. Lane, State S. S. rep- 
resentative, and was adopted. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 
To the Sunday schools is committed the heavy responsibility of 
carrying out that part of our Lord's great Commission, "Go ye 
therefore and TEACH all nations * * *." Personally, we think that 
the responsibility of teaching God's Word should be shouldered by 
all Christian parents and carried on in the home. But since there 
is such a lack of religious instruction in the home this puts a heavier 
obligation upon our church, and the one department of our organ- 
ized life that must assume this duty is our Sunday school. 

The question can well we asked: Is the teaching that we are 
doing and the instruction that our Sunday school pupils are receiv- 
ing sufficient to fit them for living a Christ-like life? There is no 
one qualified to give a complete answer to this question, but "by their 
fruits ye shall know them." Here are some interesting facts that 
will help us. 

The number of Sunday schools among Southern Baptists reached 
a total of 23,514 in 1938 — a net gain of 203 Sunday schools over the 
preceding year; whereas the Sunday school enrollment reached the 
total of 3,368,851, showing a net gain of 157,144 over the preceding 
year. By way of comparison, this net gain of 157,144 in Sunday 
school enrollment in 1938 was the second largest gain in Southern 
Baptist history. The other year of still larger gains being 1921, when 
the Sunday schools had a net gain of 221,044 new pupils. 

The Vacation Bible schools also made unprecedented gains in 
1938 — the number of schools rising from 2,520 to 3,548, with a net 
gain of 1,028 for this one year; whereas the enrollment of pupils in 
these Vacation Bible schools increased from 264,059 in 1937 to 375,455 
in 1939, with a net gain of 111,396 for one year. 

The figures for our own Association during the year 1938 are as 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



follows: Enrollment, 6,804; Losses, 71; Bible schools, 6. 

These figures are only a partial testimony of the extensive and 
intensive work of our Sunday schools. 

Suffice to say that during this year of Evangelism our Sunday 
schools will have much influence in the success or failure of this 
great movement. During this year thousands of young men in 
Europe have been enlisted as soldiers and millions are now mobilized 
for defense of their country. It behooves all those who love and fol- 
low the Captain of Salvation to mobolize themselves for a great 
crusade in teaching the Word of God. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. MATTHEWS. 

B. T. U. 

8. The report on B. T. U. was brought by Miss Charlotte Tedder. 
The report was discussed by Miss Tedder and Jno. B. Lane and was 
adopted. 

B. T. U. REPORT 
During this year our Associational B. T. U. has been ably direct- 
ed by Mr. W. R. Eddinger. Four Associational meetings have been 
held with large attendance and splendid programs at each. The 
meetings were held at Denton, Carolina Avenue, Wallburg, and 
Churchland. 

From a study of the figures compiled with reference to the B. 
T. U.s of our Association, it would appear that in most phases of 
our B. T. U. work marked progress has been made since the meeting 
of our Liberty Association in 1938. 

There are now 17 general B. T. U. organizations with directors 
and a total number of individual unions of 77, against 14 general or- 
ganizations reported last year and 60 individual unions. These 77 
unions do not include number of Story Hours in our Association. We 
have a total enrollment of 1,067 plus 88 story hour children in our 
Training Service. There has been an increase in the number of 
adults in our training service, also an increase in the number of 
seniors and story hour members, but a decline in the number of 
Intermediates and Juniors enrolled, and I raise the question — Are 
we losing our Juniors and Intermediates or are we training them for 
service in our churches? This is a question worthy of much study 
and consideration by the individual church. 

A little over one-third of our churches have no unions. This 
is a problem to be met by the individual church and the officers of 
our Association, Any church not having a B. T. U. should study 
the benefits that could result to their church from a B. T. U. I 
am sure that practically any church having a B. T. U. would be glad 
to send one or more unions to one of the churches not now having 
a B. T. U. to help them get started in this work. 

According to our records there is not a single A-1 Baptist Train- 
ing Union in our Association, although there is a possibility that 
there are some individual B. Y. P. U.'s or B. A. U.'s that are standard. 
In the report for this year there is a decided increase in the number 
of those receiving awards for study courses, and also an increase 
in the number of systematic givers to the church, but there has 
been a falling away of the number reading the Bible daily. 

With reference to our Baptist Training Unions in Liberty Asso- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



ciation — I would quote the words of the Old Testament — "Speak of 
the men that they go forward." Certainly this association has great 
possibilities — in the training of the church members of the Liberty 
Association. The aim of the B. T. U. is "Training in Church Mem- 
bership". A Christian should prepare himself or herself for service 
from conversion until death. Never should a Christian be willing 
to stand still in his progress along spiritual lines. Our churches need 
trained workers and our people training. How can we do it without 
the Baptist Training Union in every church of our Association? 

Might I exhort you just a little further by making two state- 
ments: ? 

First, may there never be a member of our Association who will 
in any way discourage by word or deed the training service of our 
churches, and 

Secondly, If you are called upon by God or man to help in 
any capacity the Training Service of your church, won't you accept 
the task and fill it to the best of your ability, not in your own 
strength alone, but through God's help? 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLOTTE TEDDER. 

ROLL CALL OF CHURCHES 

9. Roll called by the Clerk showed that all churches were repre- 
sented except Lick Creek and Pleasant Plains. 

NEW MINISTERS RECOGNIZED. 

10. The following new pastors of churches in the Association were 
at this time recognized: 

Rev. D. W. Digh Rev. E. F. Eagle 

Rev. Otis Lanning Rev. C. S. Young 

Rev. N. F. Britt Rev. N. C. Teague 

VISITORS RECOGNIZED 

12. The following visitors were recognized: 

Bennie Clodfelter, of Waughtown Baptist Church, in the Pilot 
Mountain Association; Rev. J. F. Carter, pastor Waughtown Baptist 
Church, in the Pilot Mountain Association; Rev. W. L. Ross, pastor 
of Southside Baptist Church, in the Cabarrus Association; Rev. W. 
Perry Crouch, Secretary, Department of Christian Education, State 
Baptist Convention, Raleigh, N. C; Rev. Arthur Gallimore, Mission- 
ary from China; Rev. J. A. McKaughan, Winston-Salem, N. C, of 
the Pilot Mountain Association; Rev. J. E. Kirk, Clemmons, N. C., 
pastor of the Lewisville Church in the Pilot Mountain Association; 
Hoyatt Blackwell, Mars Hill, N. C, President of Mars Hill Col- 
lege; Smith Hagerman, Winston- Salem, N. C, superintendent Bap- 
tist Hospital in Winston- Salem, N. C; Rev. J. M. Hayes, Winston- 
Salem, N. C, field worker for Meredith College; Mrs. J. M. Hayes, 
Winston -Salem, N. C; Ishmael Negrin, a Missionary from Cuba. 

COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS BY THE MODERATOR 

13. The Moderator at this time appointed the following committees. 

(1) FINANCE— L. E. Teague, W. H. Lomax, Sam J. Smith. 

(2) TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER— L. S. Gaines, E. C. Roach, 
J. W. Dickens, Jr., L. E. Hepler, Maskey M. Smith, 

(3) TO NAME REPORTERS FOR NEXT YEAR— E. P. Mumford, 
C. F. Motsinger, A. L. Snider, C. C. Wall, G. W. Miller. 

(4) TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1940— C. M. Wall, D. S. 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



Haywortli, L. J. Matthews, Rev. D. W. Digh. 

(5) COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES— H. M. Stroupe, J. A. Neil- 
son, N. F. Britt, Miss Mattie Teague. 

(6) RESOLUTIONS— Clyde Eddinger, J .A. Cox, B. J. May, T. H. 
Small. 

(7) CREDENTIALS— N. C. Teague, W. L. Bray, Charlotte Ted- 
der, W. K. McGee. 

R. D. COVINGTON, 

Moderator. 

ANNUAL SERMON 

14. The annual Sermon was brought by Rev. H. M. Stroupe, pastor 
of the Denton church. 

The Scripture reading was read by Rev. J. A. Neilson, pastor of 
Mills Home. 

The subject discussed by Rev. Stroupe was: "Some Implications 
ol Salvation By Grace." His Texts were: Ephesians 2:9-7; Phil- 
lipians 2:13-14; Matthew 28:18-20. 

ADJOURNMENT 

15. The Association adjourned at 12:30 P. M. for lunch, to reconvene 
at 2:00 P. M. 

TUESDAY 

AFTERNOON SESSION 2:00 P. M. 

16. The Devotional was lead by Rev. N. C. Teague, pastor of the 
Reeds Church, from Romans 6-13. 

CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM 

17. The report on Home Missions written by Mrs. Jno. Brewer, was 
read by S. A. AUred. 

The Report on Foreign Missions, written by Mrs. P. M. Hen- 
dricks, was read by Rev. L. S. Gaines. 

The report on Ministerial Relief was brought by A. L. Snider. 
These three reports were adopted. 

DISCUSSION OF CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM OBJECTS 

W. Perry Crouch, representing the State Board brought a help- 
ful and educational message on the objects and work being fostered 
by the Co-operative Program. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

Home Mission in the bounds of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion embraces all the work in the Panama Canal and Cuba as well 
as all the phases of the work in the 18 states of the Southern Baptist 
Convention. 

The Home Mission Board is working in our cities among the 
Indians and Negroes and in Cuba and Panama. 

We have only one missionary to the 500,000 Jews, 11 Mission- 
aries to the 650,000 French-speaking Americans, seven Missionaries 
to the 300,000 Spanish-speaking Americans, eight Missionaries to 
700 Chinese, seven Missionaries to the 2,900,000 Europeans, 44 Mis- 
sionaries to more than 800,000 Mexicans, 71 Missionaries to the 
2,500,000 Cubans, eight to 150,000 people in the Canal Zone and 
Panama, 18 Missionaries to the 10,000,000 Negroes, and 24 Mis- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



sionaries to the 200,000 Indians. Take the entire unchurched group 
of 46,000,000 people in the Home Mission including Central America, 
which is a Home Mission Field, and we have on the average only one 
Missionary in every 170,000 people. With the facts, we are compelled 
to admit that right here at our own doors, we have one of the 
most fruitful Mission Fields in the world. These people who need 
us, and the Gospel of Christ, what terrible guilt will be ours if we 
fail them. 

After 1880, streams of foreigners began to come from Eastern, 
Southeastern, and Southern Europe. Every steamer unloading upon 
our shores men without God, flag or honor. Many had no fitness for 
absorption into our American life. Most of these with different ideals 
and customs and almost all of them uneducated. 

The question we face with these today is are we assimilating 
them or are they assimilating us? 

The South is rapidly becoming a manufacturing center. In 1938 
the manufacturing interests of the South increased and exceeded 
in value agriculture more than 26 per cent. From 1935 to 1937 the 
dollar value of its manufactured products increased 35 per cent 
compared with a gain of 20 per cent from 1919] to 1929. 

In no other part of the United States has industry withstood 
the depression so well. 

With the coming of these manufacturing interests to the South 
there will come a great many people to support these Industries. 

How are we going to meet the challenge is a serious question 
to Southern Baptists? Since hundreds of thousands of these for- 
eigners and children of foreigners are pressing into the South where 
land is cheaper and living is easier and opportunity is greater 
than in the crowded North. If we win them to Christ as they come 
they will prove to us a blessing. If they remain unsaved and purely 
selfish motives and ambitions are theirs they may well prove a 
curse to our land. 

Let us remember that during the later days of the nineteenth 
century the doors of the United States were almost wide open to 
immigration. Political and industrial leaders wanted our population 
to grow. All over Europe this invitation to come to America was 
heard and families with dreams of freedom and wealth sold their 
little possessions and came by multiplied thousands to our shores. 
They were cuffed and bullied and robbed all the way and they were 
shut off from the best of American life in the slums. 

Do you wonder that they are hard to reach with the Gospel of 
Christ in America. 

The blame is not wholly theirs if they know not America. 

We will have to win them through good will centers, rescue 
missions, the six workers for the deaf, and all phases of the Baptist 
Mission work. Christ said "I am the way, the truth and the life," 
not first the Christ of bread, image and statue, not even the his- 
torical Christ of Scripture, but the Living Personal, Eternal Christ, 
Savour, Teacher, Guide, Lord, King of all. 

We have not failed utterly. We are seeing Christian homes, 
doctors, lawyers, business men and teachers whose fine Christian 
influence and loyal American and preachers with the sweet Savour 
of Christian life. It is not a dark picture. It is a bright picture. 
It is a picture of a free Gospel in a free land, working in the hearts 
of the people from all the world within its borders. We believe it is 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



an unfinished picture, this America of ours, we believe under God. 
It is our privilege and opportunity to help him finish the picture. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. JOHN BREWER. 

FOREIGN MISSION REPORT 

Ninety-four years ago, our Baptist fathers launched the foreign 
mission enterprise of Southern Baptists, midst fear and unrest, 
facing a future that was dark with foreboding and uncertainty. 
Yet, with daring sublime faith, they launched a world program of 
missions that has girdled the globe in a century. Today, we, too, 
face a time of fear and uncertainty; a world filled with strife and 
cruelty; audible and visible proof of which comes through the med- 
ium of our radios and .newspapers almost hourly. The one and 
only hope of suffering, toiling humanity is in the Gospel of Christ. 
Lest "the night cometh when no man can work," it is imperative 
that we hasten the gospel to the vast multitudes still waiting in 
pagan and heathen darkness for its light. 

However, in contrast to discouraging facts, there are some en- 
couraging. Six years ago total receipts for all purposes by our 
Foreign Mission Board were $880,573.31. Last year receipts for all 
purposes were $1,130,083.93. Our debt is being paid. We now owe 
$279,500. We have paid $830,500 on the principal of the debt in 
six years (convention report). In six years the Lottie Moon offer- 
ing has increased $186,000. At present we have 437 missionaries in 
active service. Rev. James Walton Moore, of Chefoo, China, passed 
away December 7, 1938. 

In China where the picture is indeed gloomy, with millions 
starving, homeless, we find many are turning to Christianity. Our 
missionaries have kept the faith with our Chinese brothers and 
sisters. Through the China Emergency Fund established to care 
for evacuation of missionaries where necessary, and in some small 
way repay losses of household effects. Southern Baptists through 
April 15, 1939 had contributed $53,957.44. To help Chinese Na- 
tionals the board set up a second fund known as the China Relief 
Fund. Through the same date the total received was $52,036.30 
More is needed. How can Southern Baptists better build a founda- 
tion on which to minister to China's spiritual needs than by feed- 
ing the hungry, clothing the naked, and healing the sick? 

In Mexico the year has been encouraging, with the appointment 
of seven new missionaries. The Mexican bans and restrictions are 
gradually falling off and the doors are opening wider and wider to 
the gospel and its messengers. 

In Nigeria the gospel is winning in a marvelous way, but our 
work in Africa needs rapid reinforcement. 

Our Spanish Mission has suffered terribly in the civil war, now 
ended. Many pastors are in concentration camps or in exile. A 
secretary will have attempted, by this time, something in the way 
of re -organizing our work. 

December 15, 1938 until August 14, 1939 found Baptist churches 
in Rumania closed. Many Baptists suffered fines and imprison- 
ment. Protests from Homeland Baptists have influenced the gov- 
ernment, so there are hopes of persecution disappearing in Ru- 
mania. 

A new day seems to be ahead for Italian Baptist churches, 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



since a new basis of co-operation between the Forei^ Mission 
Board and Italian Baptist Union was worked out and adopted. 

Surely, when our Lord commanded "Go ye into all the world," 
He knew the dark hours would be many. Precious are His prom- 
ises "My grace is sufficient for thee" and "Lo, I am with you always, 
even unto the end of the world." Shall we not enter the fast clos- 
ing doors of missionary fields with renewed vows to our Lord? By 
our prayers, our gifts, our time, shall we not support and strengthen 
His witnesses there? "He shall not fail nor be discouraged, till he 
have set judgment in the earth: and the isles shall wait for his 
law." Isaiah 42:4. Shall not "the faith of our fathers" inspire 
within our hearts the zeal to carry His gospel even to the "utter- 
most parts of the earth? 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. P. M. HENDRICKS 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

Until a comparatively short time ago, a vast majority of our 
denomination thought and cared nothing about assisting their 
aged and helpless Pastors and some are still more or less indifferent 
and careless about their welfare. In the past very few of these 
veterans of the Cross have been assisted — occasionally one by some 
generous hearted individual, but some assistance though occasional, 
has been irregular and pitifully inadequate. As a whole, the min- 
isters who spend their time preaching the unsearchable riches of 
Jesus Christ are not rich with this world's goods and their salaries 
are too small and in most cases not sufficient to provide only the 
bare necessities when in their prime. Therefore their income is 
by far too limited to provide for the loss of health or for old age. 

The ministers who are trying to raise and educate their chil- 
dren cannot do their best work with the salary they receive and 
have anything put aside for the evening of their lives, but to re- 
lieve them of this anxiety enables them to meet the various de- 
mands of a Pastor, giving their full time and energy to the on- 
going of the cause of Christ in their churches. 

To help this situation, the Relief and Annuity Board was or- 
ganized. There are now in North Carolina approximately 120 re- 
ceiving aid from this board. There is practically $8,000.00 per year 
being paid into N. C. to this cause by the Relief and Annuity 
Board. To our shame and discredit, there is more being paid into 
N. C. by this Board, for this cause, than we have been contributing 
to it, in the past. 

This is our fiftieth anniversary of Ministerial Relief. In 1889 
a committee of nine men raised among 100,000 N. C. Baptists the 
sum of $29.89. At the present time there is a little more than $7,- 
000 being contributed to this cause by our people which shows that 
when informed they go forward. 

With these facts before us, as members of our Associaiton, is 
it not time for us to come to the aid of our aged ministers as never 
before? Since Relief and Annuity is the only agency that South- 
ern Baptists has that attempts to care for our aged and infirm, 
why should any Baptist church hesitate to join in with its Pastor 
on the Annuity Plan of 4-4-1 set up by our Annuity Board on July 
1st of this year? 

If our people could realize that whatever benefits the pastor 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



also benefits the church, every church in this Association and in 
North Carolina would be in on this great plan. As churches, let 
us all strive to be better churches, and back up our Pastors in this 
great cause and help all our Pastors to be better Pastors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. L. SNIDER 

STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

18. The Report on State of the Churches was brought by Rev. J. 
A. Neilson. 

REPORT ON THE STATE OF CHURCHES 

A study of the church letters for this associational year just 
closed, reveals the fact that we have made progress along many 
lines, though not along every line. As an association, we contrib- 
uted $46,280.84 to Local Church Expenses, a decrease of $10,093.14 
from last year. But by way of explanation, this large difference; 
is due to the building program carried on by the Denton Church 
last year when the church raised $16,300 over and above its normal 
budget. So normally this year's report would show an increase of 
about $6,000. 

We gave to Benevolences (not including the Orphanage) $14,- 
282.41, an increases of of $209.78 over last year; to the Orphanage we 
gave $4,841.03, an increase of $584.28; to the Hospital, $735.67, a 
gain of $51.34. Pastors in the association were paid $19,646.98, or 
$1,221.25 more than they received last year. 

Our per capita gifts increased from $8.97 last year to $9.78 this 
year. We regret to report a decrease in our gifts to the Coopera- 
tive Program (undesignated) from $8,543.09 last year to $7,973.92 
this year, a difference of $569.17. But this decrease is more than 
offset by the increase in gifts this year to special offerings for 
State Missions, Home Missions, Christian Education and Minis- 
terial Relief, such increase amounting to $859.78. 

For all purposes, we contributed as an association $65,404.28, 
which normally would be an increase of approximately $7,000.00, 
but because of Denton's Building Fund last year, is a decrease of 
$9,299.10. 

Out of the 26 churches contributing, 15 increased their total 
gifts, 13 increased their gifts to Benevolences, 13 increased their 
gifts to Local Expenses (not same 13) and 18 increased their gifts 
per capita. Eleven churches decreased their gifts to Benevolences, 
eleven (not same 11) decreased their gifts to Local Expenses, eight 
decreased their gifts per capita. 

In gifts to the Orphanage, 18 churches gave more this year 
than last, 5 gave less, while 3 gave the same. In gifts to the hos- 
pital, 13 churches gave more this year, 10 gave less, and 3 gave 
the same. Ten churches gave more to both the Orphanage and 
the Hospital and 2 gave less to both. 

Every church in the Association contributed something to the 
Orphanage, and all but 3 gave to the Hospital. As to church mem- 
bership, our churches report 6,686 members, a gain of 80 over last 
year, and 289 baptisms, a decrease of 63 from last year. Four 
churches in our Association report no baptisms, as compared with 
6 reporting none last year. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



Our Sunday School enrollment has decreased by 71, and our 
average attendance at Sunday School by 52. We have gained 17 
unions in B. T. U. but decreased 34 in enrollment. You may be 
interested in knowing that in the last 7 years, we have doubled 
our gifts to Benevolences, and have more than tripled our special 
gifts to State, Home and Foreign Missions, Christian Education 
and Ministerial Relief, 

As Missionary Baptists we ought to be proud of the fact that 
in the last 7 years our W. M. U. organizations have increased from 
71 to 89, while those enrolled in Mission Study classes have in- 
creased from 428 to 1051. 

We are grateful for all the progress we have made, but much 
yet needs to be done. From the inspiration of those hours to- 
gether, let us go back to our churches and get to work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. NEILSON 

19. The Association adjourned at 4:00 P. M. to reconvene tomorrow 
at 9:45 A. M. 

THE SECOND DAY 
WEDNESDAY 

MORNING SESSION, SEPTEMBER 6, 1939—9:45 A. M. 

20. The morning devotional was conducted by Rev. N. F. Britt, 
pastor of the Southside Church. His words were based on Revela- 
tions 1-17. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

21. The committee heretofore named to recommend officers, recom- 
mend the following, which was adopted: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1940 
We recommend to the body the following for officers next year: 
For Moderator — R. D. Covington. 
For Vice Moderator — G. W. Miller. 
For Clerk and Treasurer — S. J. Smith. 

Program Committee for 1940 — The Moderator and Clerk of the 
Association and the Pastor of the church entertaining the 1940 
session. 

Orphanage Representative — C, M. Wall. 

Chairman of the Executive-Promotion Committee — J. A. Neilson. 
Associational Biblical Recorder Representative — W. K. McGee. 
Associational Sunday School Superintendent — C. F. Motsinger. 
Director of Associational B. T. U. — W. R. Eddinger. 

C. M. WALL, 

D. S. HAYWORTH, 
L. J. MATTHEWS, 

Committee on Nominations 

22. On motion of C. M. Wall, Sr., duly seconded, Rev. W. K. Mc- 
Gee was instructed to cast the vote of the body for Moderator, 
which Rev. McGee cast for R, D. Covington. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

23. The Report on Christian Education was brought by Romulus 
Skaggs and was adopted. 



20 



MINUTES OF THE 



REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Twenty-five years ago the foundations of civilization were torn 
asunder by unchristian forces, and today the patthed-up remnants 
are again being assailed by the same spirit of violence. Primitive 
forces are at work which are not only NOT content to ignore the 
faith of our fathers, in this and distant lands, but are violently 
aggresive to uproot and destroy that faith. This cannot be com- 
batted by taking for granted that the Faith will take care of it- 
self; Christians must contend for the faith. 

Our younger generation is uncertain as to the purpose and 
proper direction of life, though seeking the eternal verities that 
will challenge them best that is in them for life and eternity. 
Frivolous secularisms are leaving their souls hungry and their 
hearts cold. Paganism has proven a transparents sham even to 
the totalitarian youth, and we are told they are looking for the 
best, a face-to-face first hand knowledge of God. 

This bespeaks a Christian education which will produce Chris- 
tian leadership and Christian followership. "The primary aim of 
education is the development and enrichment of manhood and 
womanhood, and then the proper integration of that manhood 
and womanhood with the totality of God's universe. This is totali- 
tarianism at its best." Only a Christian education enables the in- 
dividual to develop his best self, to appreciate the rich meaning of 
life, and to recognize that life is only a prelude to a richer and 
more meaningful future life in our risen Lord. 

Our Baptist leadership, foreseeing the necessity for Christian 
training, has provided and is conducting sixty-seven academies, 
colleges, universities and seminaries which are growing apace, and 
which last year enrolled over 32,000 students. These institutions, 
genuinely Christian in atmosphere, merit our continued and in- 
creasing support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROMULUS SKAGGS 

ADDRESS ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

24. At this time the audience of the Association was brought a 
delightful and uplifting address on "Christian Education, A Co- 
operative Enterprise" by Hoyt Blackwell, president of Mrs Hill 
College. 

BAPTIST HOSPITALS 

25. The Report on Baptist Hospitals was brought by Maskey M. 
Smith and was adopted. 

REPORT ON THE BAPTIST HOSPITAL, WINSTON- SALEM 
In Matthew we read "And Jesus put forth his hand and touch- 
ed him saying, I will, be thou clean." In order to carry out the 
whole program of Jesus the Baptist denomination owns and op- 
erates 20 hospital in 14 Southern States. Our Baptist Hospital in 
Winston-Salem was established 16 years ago. Last year over 4,000 
patients were treated. About 90% of these came from outside Win- 
ston-Salem, and over one-third of all patients were treated free. 
During 1938 more than $18,000 worth of charity was rendered to 
those unable to pay. 

Last year more than 100 preachers and missionaries were given 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



treatment, over 1,000 mothers were restored to their families. Thus 
the Baptist Hospital is blessing thousands of homes and neighbor- 
hoods throughout the state. A love of Jesus and the practical ap- 
plication of it to suffering humanity is being spread far and wide. 

Because of lack of room more than 2,000 patients were unable 
to be accommodated. However, at this time additions are being 
made and soon it is hoped the present accommodations of 108 beds 
will be almost doubled. Every person applying is admitted (if there 
is room) and no discrimination is made, whether pay or charity 
patients. 

The Hospital represents an investment of well over one-half 
million dollars. Current expenses are kept fully paid. 

Jesus said of the faithful: "I was sick — and ye visited me." 
The church is doing just this as we support the Hospital. As much 
free service is given as is made possible through gifts of money and 
linen made by our churches. 

Jesus has a whole program, not a half of one. Jesus never half 
but completely saves. If the church has a program it is that of 
Jesus' and it includes healing the sick. 

Every church having a budget should always include our Bap- 
tist Hospital in it and not forget the special Mother's Day offering 
that is so much needed. 

Since our Hospital is now being enlarged and will cost a large 
sum, here is a timely recommendation: go back to your respective 
church and insist a special offering be made for it and send it in. 

Surely the Baptist Hospital is a blessing to suffering humanity, 
and as an arm of the church should be supported generously. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MASKEY M. SMITH 

ADDRESS BY SMITH HAGERMAN, SUPERINTENDENT OF 
BAPTIST HOSPITAL, WINSTON- SALEM, N. C. 

26. After the adoption of the report on the Baptist Hospital, a 
most instructive address on the spiritual and physical needs of 
humanity was brought by Mr, Hagerman. 

REV. ARTHUR GALLIMORE MAKES ADDRESS 

27. The Association heard with much pleasure and silent atten- 
tion an address by Rev. Arthur Gallimore, a denominational mis- 
sionary to China, who is at home on a furlough. He related recent 
and present conditions in China, with much interest to the audience. 

28. The body adjourned at 12:30 P. M. to reconvene at 1:45 P. M. 

TUESDAY 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

29. The Association reconvened at 1:45 P. M. The devotional was 
conducted by Rev. Otis Lanning, pastor of the Reid Street church. 

REMARKS BY ISHMAEL NEGIN 

30. Ishmael Negin, a missionary to Cuba, made a short talk at this 
time in regard to the work in Cuba. 

COLLECTION FOR NEGRINS 

31. On motion of Sam J. Smith a collection was taken at this time 
for Mr. and Mrs. Negrin, missionaries to Cuba. The amount raised 
was $22.14. 



22 



MINUTES OF THE 



REPORT OF CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE 

32. The Credentials Committee filed their report. Same was 
adopted. 

We, the Committee on Credentials, hereby recommend for 
membership in the Liberty Baptist Association, the Reid Street 
Baptist Church of Thomasville, N. C, and the Oak Hiil Memorial 
Baptist Church of the Fair Grove community, near Thomasville. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLOTTE TEDDER, 

TOM W. BRAY, 

N. C. TEAGUE, 

W. K. McGEE, Chairman 

W. M. U. REPORT 

33. The W. M. U. report was brought at this time by Mrs. A. F. 
Warfford. The report was adopted and some rem.arks made by 
Rev. L. J. Matthews. 

The work of the Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty As- 
sociation has kept a steady movement upward and onward as new 
recruits have been added and new enthusiasm and interest aroused 
by helpful programs arranged for the year and by mission study. 

The annual meeting for the year was held with the Jersey 
church in April. Reports for the year 1938 were very gratifying. 
The day's program was featured by discussions of the various 
phases of our work by a number of women of the Association. 

Twenty out of the 26 churches in the Association have at least 
one organization. We met all our aims last year as an Association, 
with the exception of one, one- tenth increase in the total enroll- 
ment in the societies of the Association during the year. We went 
a little over the financial goal, our contributions last year amount- 
ed to $7,201.00. 

The aim for this year is a five per cent increase over the co- 
operative program for last year. We gave for the cooperative pro- 
gram in 1938, $3,934.93. Our goal for the year 1939 is $4,131.67. Of 
course, all our special offerings are to be added to that. A review of 
our work for the past ten years. Does our advancement prove that 
we have gone forward in our work for the Master the last ten 
years. We can only judge by that which is visible. During the ten 
years we have poured in^o the ongoing and upbuilding of the King- 
dom more than $55,000.00, yea much more than that, for no doubt 
thousands of dollars have been spent in personal service and good 
deeds for our hospital and for the needy that have not been listed 
on our earthly accounts. 

Many of our workers of a decade ago have passed over the river 
and we know they received a hearty welcome on the other side for 
"By their fruits ye shall know them." In some instances the work 
suffered because of their departure and almost lay dormant for 
months or years. In other instances new workers were put to the 
front even som who had not realized their usefulness and capabili- 
ties and found great joy in the Master's service. 

We would not forget to pay tribute to Mrs. Edna R. Harris, who 
departed this life in May, 1939. She had served many years as our 
state corresponding secretary. She was greatly loved by all who 
knew her. The state as well as our Association feels keenly her 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



loss and we are all made sad at her going. 

Ten years ago we had 40 organizations. At the close of 1938 
we had 67 and we have several already organized in this year. 

One of our greatest improvements is our work in mission study. 
This has grown by leaps and bounds. Ten years ago we reported 
13 societies having mission study classes. In 1938 71 classes re- 
ported. Five of these were pioneer classes. 

During the last few years 3 native workers have been supported, 
two in China and one in Africa. 

A most helpful feature of the work in our Association has been 
the School of Missions held each year in many of our churches. 
This not only brings information and inspiration to our W. M. U. 
family but to all the church family. 

It is the glory of woman that she was sent into the world to 
live for others rather than for herself. Jesus said, "Follow Me." 
We follow Him in our preparation for a life of service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. A. F. WARFFORD 

SOME REMARKS BY REV. J. M. HAYES 

34. At this time Rev. J. M. Hayes, field representative of Meredith 
College, and a beloved ex-pastor in the Association, made some well 
received remarks about Meredith College and Christian Education. 

PUBLIC MORALS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

35. A brilliant and well received address on Public Morals and Law 
Enforcement was brought at this time by Hon. L. A. Martin. 

THE MILLS HOME 

36. The Report on Mills Home was written by Mrs. C. M. Howell 
and in her absence was read by Rev. W. K. McGee. The report was 
adopted. 

Since the Mills Home was founded in 1884, the report to the 
Association each year has started with that year. 

Today I am reporting from September 1938 to September 1939. 

The "orphanage" as we call the Mills Home is continuing, with 
the aid of the Baptists of North Carolina to train and fit unfor- 
tunate boys and girls for a life of usefulness and Christian service 
after they leave the institution. This is one of the daily tasks and 
responsibilities of the Christian church, and to quote Mr. Greer 
"the government can not meet the spiritual needs of humanity for 
this is distinctly the function of the church." The churches of the 
Liberty Association must have vision to see these opportunities and 
must be courageous enough to do something about them. 

If you read the alumni column of Charity and Children I am 
sure you will not feel that your interest and support of the institu- 
tion has been in vain. 

It is true that all do not make good, tjjit the proportion mak- 
ing good is much greater than that of children raised in om- homes, 
so statistics teach. 

The children (all ages) go to school half the day and work at 
some definite work, under trained supervision, the other half. 

There have been admitted this year 69 and gone out from the 
institution 76. Present enrollment, 439. The school has had a very 
prosperous year under Mr. Skaggs — graduating 34, the largest class 



MINUTES OF THE 



in the history of the orphanage. Eight of these are entering col- 
lego this month, either working their way, borrowing, or some in- 
terested person helping them. Six are already taking a business 
course. Five are studying beauty culture. Seven went to work. 
One girl is entering Baltimore Hospital for training and seven 
have gone to homes of relatives and friends. 

The church is progressing nicely under the capable leadership 
of Rev. J. A. Neilson. He being the son of a missionary, he cer- 
tainly knows how to give the children the best of missionary in- 
formation. They have had natives from China, Hungary and Chile, 
and in the School of Missions Dr. and Mrs. Bryan of China. No 
institution or church has the splendid information and training 
which these children are able to get. 

Seldom does a child leave the institution without becoming a 
Christian. The boys are becoming more interested in music and 
the choir; they used to think it sissy to sing, but now they are 
trained to appreciate the best music and its place in the church. 

One young woman, student at Mars Hill, is a student volunteer 
to China. 

The church is self supporting and the orphanage does not pay 
the pastor's salary. The small number of workers give largely of 
their meager earnings. 

The health of the children is good. There has been only one 
death (and that by his own hand). Such excellent health for so 
large a group is outstanding. 

In the Charity and Children shop there are 16 boys being train- 
ed for definite work in the printing line. 

The circulation of the paper is above 28.000 and is the only re- 
ligious periodical in the South, combined with the job department, 
that has showed a substantial profit each year for the past 30 years. 

The children are blessed with plenty of milk and the farm is 
producing more than formerly. As you know, the weather governs 
the farms and no year has the farm been productive enough to feed 
entirely the number at the orphanage. Canned goods, fresh vege- 
tables and other produce has to be bought now and then for it 
takes a quantity to feed so many hungry mouths. The daily ex- 
penses are $580.00. These expenses are partly met by the once-a- 
month Sunday School offering and the regular Thanksgiving offer- 
ing. And how important it is that each Sunday School in the Lib- 
erty Association give regularly, once-a-month, to this worthy cause. 

Several of the long time workers have given up their work and 
younger ones have taken their places. Miss Turner, the lady super- 
intendent, after 39 useful years, saw fit to drop out. Hundreds of 
boys and girls, now men and women, will always revere the name 
"Miss Turner." Her life has inspired them to be noble Christians 
and we can all rise up and call her "blessed." What she has meant 
to motherless boys and girls words cannot express. 

Orphpnage work is not easy sailing, for so many difficult prob- 
lems confront each and every worker; but the fact that the great 
Baptist denomination has backed up the work and God is still be- 
hind every good impulse, this alone inspires his followers to lead 
on eternally. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. C. M. HOWELL 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



SONG BY TRIO FROM ORPHANAGE 

37. Three girls from the orphanage, Miss Ruth Lyon, Miss Eloise 
Stancil and Miss Ruby Lyon at this time delighted and touched the 
audience with the song, "Shall I Crucify My Savior." 

ADDRESS BY MR. I. G. GREER 

38. Mr. I. G. Greer, superintendent of the Mills Home, lifted the 
audience as he spoke of the work and results at the Mills Home. 

39. Sam J. Smith, treasurer, read his report. The report was 
adopted. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 
Receipts for the 1938 Session 

To amount collected for 1939 Minute Fund $146.30 

To amount paid Dispatch, Minutes $110.00 

To amount paid Charity & Children, programs 4.00 

To amount paid, postage 6.28 

To amount paid phone calb .80 

To amount paid Lance Banks, 1,000 each printed 

letterheads and envelopes 7.00 

To amount retained for my service as Clerk 18.22 



$146.30 $146.30 

To balance due me as Clerk $11.78 



SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer 

40. The Committee on Time, Place and Preacher made their re- 
port, which was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 

" We recommend to the body the following: 

TIME— Tuesday and Wednesday, September 3rd and 4th, 1940. 

CHURCH and PLACE— Center Hill Baptist Church, P. O. Lex- 
ington, R. 6. 

PREACHER— L. S. Games. 

ALTERNATE PREACHER— N. C. Teague. 

E. C. ROACH, 
L. E. HEPLER, 
MASKEY M. SMITH, 
L. S. GAINES, 
J. W. DICKENS, 

Committee 

41. The Resolutions Committee made the following report, which 
was adopted: 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

The Committee on Resolutions of Hospitality wish to extend to 
the good people of the Wallburg Church the gratitude and heart- 
felt thanks of those meeting with them for the good meals and the 
social hours of fellowship and for the use of their church as a meet- 
ing place for the Association. 

We also wish to congratulate them on the splendid work they 



26 



MINUTES OF THE 



are doing and on the completion of their rebuilding and improve- 
ment program. 

REV. J. A. COX, 
REV. J. M. PICKLER, 

B. J. MAY 

42, The Committee to name Reporters for next year made their 
report, which was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NAME REPORTERS FOR 1940 

We recommend the following: 

Baptist Hospitals: N. C. Teague, P. O., Lexington, N. C, R. 3. 
B. T. U.: Wilford Eddinger, P. O., Thomasville, N. C. 
Christian Education: J. A. McMillan, P. O., Thomasville, N. C. 
Foreign Missions: Mrs. C. M. Howell, P. O., Thomasville, N. C. 
Home Missions: Mrs. W. A. Shoaf, P. O., Winston- Salem, N C. 
Ministerial Relief: C. M. Wall, P. O., Lexington, N. C. 
Mills Home: D. S. Hayworth, P. O., High Point, N. C, R. 2. 
Public Morals and Law Enforcement: H. M. Stroup, P. O., Den- 
ton, N. C. 

Christian Literature: L. J. Matthews, P. O., Winston- Salem, R. 5. 

Digest of Church Letters and State of the Churches: W. K. 
McGee, P. O., Thomasville. 

State Missions: W. H. Lomax, P. O., Churchland. 

Sunday Schools: J. W. Dickens, P. O., Lexington, R. 6. 

W. M. U.: Miss Sallie McCracken, P. O., Thomasville, N. C. 

G. W. MILLER, 
A. L. SNIDER, 

C. F. MOTSINGER, 
E. F. MUMFORD , 

Committee 

43. The Associational Promotion Executive Committee made the 
annual report, which was adopted. 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE PROMOTION COM- 
MITTEE OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION ON MON- 
DAY EVENING, JUNE 26, 1939, MILLS HOME BAPTIST 
CHURCH, THOMASVILLE, N. C. 

Meeting called to order by Rev. J. A. Neilson, chairman. Prayer 
by Rev. N. F. Britt. 

Roll Call: G .C. Orrell, Smith's Grove; J. A. Neilson and I. G. 
Greer, Mills Home; D. L. Tysinger, Center Hill; Rev. D. W. Digh, 
Center Hill and Smith's Grove; L. S. Gaines and C. M. Wall, Sr., 
Lexington; E. C. Roach and Carl Haines, Erlanger; N. F. Britt, 
Southside; W. K. McGee and L. W. Hansell, Thomasville; Wllifred 
Eddinger, Rich Fork; J. A. Cox, Carolina Avenue; C. S. Young and 
Otis Frank, Sheets Memorial, L. E. Lookabill, Miller Wilson, A. L. 
Long, Stoner's Grove; Rev. E. F. Eagle and R. L. Palmer, Jersey; 
B. J. May, Liberty; Rev. N. C. Teague and Frank Foster, Reeds; 
Vice Moderator, G. W. Miller; Clerk, Sam J. Smith; visitor: Rev. 
J. A. McMillan, Editor Charity and Children. 

I — Approval of requests for aid from State Mission Fund. Pass- 
ed unanimously. 

a — Sheets Memorial Baptist Church, $15 per month during 1940. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



b— Reid Street Baptist Church, $36 per month during 1940. 

II — Approval of recommendation of a policy to Liberty Baptist 
Association. (Motion made by W. K. McGee, second by B. J. May; 
amendment, adding No. 3 by C. M. Wall, with second by J. A. Cox. 
Passed by almost unanimous vote, but no votes against.) 

"Whereas, within the bounds of Liberty Baptist Association, 
there has been a lack of uniformity in the practice of examining 
candidates for ordination to the full work of the Gospel Ministry, 

And whereas, we believe that every candidate for the Ministry 
is entitled to the fellowship, counsel and public commendation of 
the associational group of Ministers into whose fellowship he would 
be set apart, 

And whereas, we believe that our denominational solidarity 
would be strengthened and our Ministry would be more highly es- 
teemed thereby, — 

We, The Executive Promotion Committee of Liberty Baptist As- 
sociation, in session Monday evening, June 26, 1939, in Mills Home 
Baptist Church, Thomasviile, N. C, do fraternally and urgently 
recommend to Liberty Baptist Association when In session wi.th the 
Wallburg Baptist Church, September 5-6, 1939, that the following 
policy be approved and suggested as the future practice to be fol- 
lowed in our several churches: 

1— That when a church desires to put forth a candidate for 
examination and approval for ordination to the full work of the 
Gospel Ministry, an Examining Council be summoned by written 
invitation of at least one week in advance from the church nomi- 
nating the candidate, the Council to include the pastor and one 
member-at-large from each Baptist Church in the fellowship of the 
Association. 

2 — ^That the examination of the candidate be conducted publicly 
in the auditorium of the nominating church, and prior announce- 
ment given in good time so that all the brethren who wish to do 
so may attend the examination. 

3— That we ordain only those who have received a definite call 
to become pastor of a Baptist Church in regular standing in its 
Association, which church shall have requested his ordination." 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS S. GAINES, 
Secretary E. P. C. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES 

44. The Report of the Committee on Obituaries was read by Miss 
Sallie Mccracken. The report was adopted as read. 

For list of names contained in report see Page 36. 
In memory of those who had died during the year the Associa- 
tion stood while it was led in the closing prayer by Rev. N. P. Britt. 

45. The body adjourned at 4:30 P. M. 

R. D. COVINGTON, Moderator SAM J. SMITH, Clerk 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE W. M. U. 
LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Association held the 
thirty-third annual meeting April 26, with the Jersey Baptist 
Church. The Superintendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken had charge 



28 



MINUTES OF THE 



of the program, the theme of which was "The Challenge of a New 
Day." The meeting began at 10 o'clock with the hymn, "Love Di- 
vine," sung by the congregation. Following the song was the re- 
peating of the watchword for the year, "For the love of Christ con- 
straineth us." 2 Cor. 5:14. Mrs. R. S. Green conducted a very in- 
spiring devotional, using for her subject "Exalting the Bible." Miss 
Roxie Sheets led in prayer. Friendly greetings were given the union 
b y Mrs.R. L. Palmer of Jersey Church and also by the pastor of 
the church, Rev. E. F. Eagles, At this time, the pastors were recog- 
nized, among whom was Rev. N. C. Teague, who has recently come 
into this association. Mrs. Edna R. Harris, State Executive Secre- 
tary, and Miss Wilma Bucy of the Home Mission Board were recog- 
nizea also. The hymn, "I Love to Tell the Story" was sung by the 
congregation. 

REPORTS OF ASOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 
Personal Service 
The number of societies that reported persopal service work this 
year — 51 societies in 17 churches. Last year, we had 54 societies in 
19 churches. We have fallen off two churches and three societies. 
Number reporting W. M. S. 16; Y. W. A. 10; G. A. 11; R. A. 7; Sun- 
beams 6. Kinds of personal service done — ^Gifts to Mills Home; gifts 
to Hospital; helping needy families; furnishing S. S. literature to 
Negro children; holding cottage prayer meetings; shower for un- 
fortunate mother; help send a patient to the sanitorium; shower 
for an orphan girl going off to work; nursing the sick; writing let- 
ters to lonesome children; carrying flowers to sick and visiting shut- 
ins; literature to prisoners; visiting and comforting bereaved fami- 
lies; welcoming strangers in church; taking part in vacation Bible 
school; furnishing scrap book for children in infirmary, sanitorium 
and hospital; help bear the expense of house party for G. A. and 
R. A. at Meredith. 

MRS. A. F. WARFFORD, 

Personal Service Chairman 

The challenge of Mission Study was as follows: 

I— CHURCHES CONDUCTING W. M. U. MISSION STUDY 
CLASSES 

1 Carolina Avenue (Thomasville) 

2 Churchland 

3 Lexington (1st) 

4 Mills Home (Thomasville) 

5 New Friendship 

6 Reeds 

7 Thomasville (1st) 

8 Wallburg 

9 Welcome 

II— W. M. S. 



Number of classes enrolled 23 

Number enrolled 257 

Awards, Record Card No. 1 37 

Awards, Record Card No. 2 59 

Awards, Silver Seals 268 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



Awards, Official Seals 3 

Awards, Home and Foreign 3 

Awards, Reading Cards 11 

Awards, Reading Stamps 17 

III— Y. W. A. 

Number of classes held 6 

Number enrolled 48 

Awards, Certificates 11 

Awards, Seals 11 

IV— G. A. 

Number of classes held 6 

Number enrolled 180 

Awards, Certificates 62 

Awards, Seals 90 

V— R. A. 

Number of classes held 5 

Number enrolled 133 

Awards, Certificates 70 

Awards, Seals 38 

VI— SUNBEAMS 

Number of classes held 5 

Number enrolled 139 

Awards, Certificates 54 

Awards, Seals 77 

VII— TOTALS 

Number of classes held 45 

Number enrolled 757 

Number of Awards 811 

VIII— PIONEER CLASSES 

W. M. S .....1— First Church, Thomasville 

G. A. 1— Mills Home, Thomasville 

R. A 1— Mills Home, Thomasville 

Sunbeams 1 — ^Reeds 

IX— SCHOOLS OF MISSIONS 
Total Number— 3 

(These varied in length from a one-day session to a short daily 
session for five days.) 

X— THE CONTACTS 
The chairman contacted each W. M, S. twice during the year 
by letter. 

XI— CRITICISMS 

1— Only nine (9) churches held mission study classes. All who 
did were greatly benefitted. 

2 — Too few pioneer classes were held. Let us strive to enlist our 
uninterested members. 

3— No stewardship books were taught. If we neglect this im- 



30 



MINUTES OF THE 



portant phase of study we are materially weakening the whole struc- 
ture. 

XII— PRAISE 

Churches having no classes in 1938 are already reporting classes 
for the year 1939. The nine churches having Mission Study Classes 
did a praiseworthy work. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. LOUIS S. GAINES, 

Mission Study Chairman 

In the absence of Mrs. Gaines, the report was read by Miss 
Charlotte Tedder. Mrs. Edna R. Harris gave words of emphasis 
also. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

In my first message as Superintendent ten years ago I said the 
following in closing: "With the review of the work and the mar- 
velous growth of which I am sure you are hardly aware, and with 
this preview setting forth the worth to be done and the glorious 
accomplishment that may be consummated if "all have a mind to 
work" I trust we may return to our homes with a new vision of the 
possibilities that lie in the bounds of our association, and with a 
determination to do our part in the building of the Kingdom. If 
this is done, there will be such an advancement in the next ten 
years that we will be amazed at the results, and the workers, as 
they pass to their reward, will hear the joyous greeting: "Enter 
thou into the joy of thy Lord." 

The ten years have passed. Do the fruits of this decade justify 
the answer that we did accept the challenge and go out to labor 
with more love for the Master and more consecration in His serv- 
ice? We can only judge that which is visible. During these ten 
years we have poured into the Lord's treasury for the ongoing and 
upbuilding of His Kingdom more than $55,000.00. Yea, and much 
more than that, for no doubt thousands of dollars have been spent 
in personal service and good deeds for our hospital and for the 
needy that have not been listed on our earthy accounts. 

Many of our faithful workers have passed over the river dur- 
ing these ten years and we know that they received a hearty wel- 
come on the other side, for "by their fruits ye shall know them." 
In some instances the work seemed to suffer because of their de- 
parture until capable leaders could be found, while in others new 
workers were called into service, even some who had not realized 
their capabilities and usefulness but found great joy after entering 
into this leadership. 

While we are proud of the fact that we have from our small 
association put this amount of $55,000.00 into Kingdom work we 
feel sure this is not the greatest good that has come as a result of 
our organization. 

Many of our women have developed a leadership they had not 
dreamed they could attain. Many young people have been trained 
and sent out to be leaders, not only in our own communities, but 
are scattered throughout the entire world, and others trained and 
fitted to take their places as faithful workers in the churches in 
their home communities. This, to my mind, is one of our most im- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



portant tasks. And we would not overlook the Bible study and 
prayer life that deepen and enrich the lives of all who participate. 

One of our greatest advancements is in mission study. This 
has grown by leaps and bounds. Ten years ago we reported 13 
societies having mission study classes. In 1938 we had 71 classes 
with five of these being Pioneer classes. During the last few years 
three native mission workers have been supportd by some of our 
societies or members, two in China and one in Africa and we are 
just entering the Home Field with one worker supported. A most 
helpful feature of the work has been the schools of missions held 
in various churches. This not only brings information and inspira- 
tion to the W. M. U. family but to the entire church family. 

Ten years ago we had forty organizations. At the close of 1938 
we had 67, with several new ones organized the first quarter of this 
new year. 

New Friendship and Thomasville maintain their standing as 
Full Graded A-1 societies. Besides these we have the following A- 
1 societies: Mills Home W. M. S., Lockett G. A., Naomi Schell G. 
A., Gallimore R. A. and Sunbeams; Reeds G. A. and Erlanger R. 
A.; Lexington G. A. and Lexington R. A. 

In the light of the above, let us go forward and like William 
Carey take for our motto: "Attempt great things for God — Expect 
great thing from God," "Looking unto Jesus the author and finish- 
er of cur faith who for the joy that was set before Him endured 
the cross, despising the shame and is set down at the right hand 
of the throne of God.' 

SALLIE L. Mccracken, superintendent 
TREASURER'S REPORT 



Balance January 1, 1938 $ 8.05 

Collected 24.96 



Total $33.01 $33.01 

Disbursements 

To Mrs. C. K. Dozier $10.00 

To Postage 5.00 

Miss Sallie McCracken — Expense 10.00 



Total $25.00 25.00 

Balance $ 8.01 



After a few announcements and the appointment of committees, 
the time was given to our guest speaker for the day, Miss Wilma 
Bucy. We especially appreciate this message because we have not 
had a speaker from the Home Mission Field recently, and we were 
deeply moved as Miss Bucy presented "The Challenge of a Nev/ 
Day" in the work of the Home Mission Board. We were dismissed 
for lunch by the pastor. 

Lunch 

Reassembling at 1 o'clock P. M. the congregation sang "Tell Me 
the Old, Old Story." Rev. N. C. Teague brought to us a spiritual 
message from Rom. 1:8-16 and then led in prayer. Following this, 
we were favored with a quartet from Jersey Church, "Why Should 
I Give," led by Mrs. R. L. Palmer. We were entertained in a very 



32 



MINUTES OF THE 



helpful way by the children of the Jersey Society and with The 
Story of Missions in pageant and song given by the Thomasville 
W. M. S. The presence of Mrs. Edna R. Harris, has always added 
rrxuch to our meetings and her address at this time was a leading 
feature of the program. At the close of her address, Mrs. Harris 
led in a brief conference. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 
Time and Place 

The committee on Time and Place recommend that the next 
meeting be held with the Abbott's Creek Church the last week in 
April, 1940. 

MRS. R. G. JENNINGS, 
MRS. L. H. WILSON, 
MRS. T. H. MILLS, 

Committee 

Courtesy 

We wish to thank the Superintendent and those responsible 
for the splendid program. We are especially grateful for the two 
inspiring messages brought by Miss Wilma Bucy and Mrs. Edna R. 
Harris. Tlie special program and special music brought by Jersey 
and Thomasville societies were thoroughly enjoyed and brought 
worthwhile messages. We were welcomed in words and also in 
favors and fellowship received. The lunch was so beautiful and 
rielicious and the flowers were beautiful. The spiritual values and 
the fellowship will long remain with us. and for it all, we are 
deeply grateful to everyone who had a part in any way in arrang- 
ing it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. E. C. ROACH, Chairman 
MRS. B. F. DUNCUM, 
MRS. E. L. MORGAN 

IN MEMORIAM 

A very impressive service led by Mrs. I. G. Greer was held in 
memory of deceased mem.bers. The following names were read: 
Miss Salli Ferryman, Lexington; Miss Minnie Wall, Wallburg; Mrs. 
Jessie Yarborough, Sheets Memorial; Mrs. W. K. McGee, Thomas- 
ville; Mrs. Bettie Messick, New Friendship. The congregation then 
stood in reverence while Mrs. Greer read Rev. 14:13 and the follow- 
ing poem: 

"They are not dead! they have but passed 

Beyond the mists that blind us here, 
Into the new and larger life 
Of that serener sphere. 

"They have but dropped their robe of clay 

To put their shining raiment on; 
They have not wandered far away — 
They are not "lost" — or "gone." 

"Though disenthralled and glorified, 

They still are here and love us yet; 
The dear ones they have left behind 
They never can forget." 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



Following the reading of the poem, Mrs. J. A. Neilson sang 
with deep feeling, "The City Four-Square." 

NOMINATIONS 

Superintendent — Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 
Associate Superintendent — Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C. 
Young People's Leader — Mrs. N. C. Teague, Lexington, R. 3, 
N. C. 

Personal Service — Mrs. A. F. Wlarfford, R. 6, Lexington, N. C. 
Mission Study — Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, R. 4, Win- 
ston-Salem, N. C. 

MRS. W. A. SHOAF, 
MRS. R. S. GREEN, 
MRS. ELI J. SMITH, 
MRS. J. W. BEATON, 

Committee 

At the suggestion of Mrs. C. M. Howell, a motion was made and 
unanimously carried that the W. M. U. of Liberty Association fur- 
nish a room in the new annex of the Baptist Hospital in Winston- 
Salem in honor of our Superintendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, 
who has served so faithfully for the past ten years. 

In closing. Rev. T. W. Bray gave an inspirational address and 
led in prayer. 

MRS. MASKEY M. SMITH, Secretary 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSO- 
CIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL MEETINGS HELD 
DURING THE LAST YEAR 

Octobei' 2, 1938 — The Liberty Baptist Associational Sunday 
Schools met with the Welcome Church at 2:30 P. M. The devo- 
tional was first in order after which the roll call with short reports 
were made. 

The subjects discussed were: "Getting Ready for the New Sun- 
day School Year," by B. J. May; "Do Sunday School Officers and 
Teachers Need to Be Trained?" by R. Skaggs; "A Training School 
in Each Church in October," by J. W. Dickens. Our State Sunday 
School worker, Mr. Lane, being present brought a short but inspir- 
ing message. 

All general officers were re-elected for another year (the Gen- 
eral Superintendent was elected by the Liberty Baptist Association 
at its September meeting.) The officers for the coming year follow: 

General Superintendent Conrad F. Motsinger 

Associate Superintendent J. W. Dickens 

Secretary and Treasurer Maskey M. Smith 

There was also appointed three group superintendents: Lexing- 
ton Group, G. W. Miller; Denton Group, John L. Snyder; Thomas- 
ville Group, B. J. May. 

Churches represented 12, total present 87. Among these were 
four pastors, five superintendents and 31 teachers. 

January 8, 1939— The Liberty Baptist Associational Sunday 
Schools met with the Erlanger Church. After the devotional the 
roll call showed 14 churches represented, 115 present, including five 



34 



MINUTES OF THE 



pastors, seven superintendents, 35 teachers and 26 deacons. 

The main feature on the program consisted of a discussion of 
the subject: "Building a Great Sunday School .Through System- 
ized Visitation" which was led by Miss Tedder. 

April 2, 1939 — The Liberty Baptist Associational Sunday Schools 
met with the Mills Home Church. Included in the devotional was 
a special song by some girls of the Mills Home. 

An interesting talk was made by C. C. Wall using as his sub- 
ject: "Visitation Day, How We Did It!" 

There was a conference period for the different departments. 

Other subjects discussed were: "A demonstration on using the 
Bible in Teaching" by Miss Irene James, of Winston- Salem; "A 
Training School in April for All Our Sunday Schools," by J. W 
Dickens; "Daily Vacation Bible Schools" was discussed informally. 

There were 15 churches represented, 132 present, including three 
pastors, 11 superintendents, 41 teachers and 26 deacons. 

After the conference Rev, W. K. McGee brought an inspiring 
message, "Winning to Christ." 

July 2, 1939 — ^The Liberty Baptist Associational Sunday Schools 
met with the Abbotts Creek church. Devotional was conducted by 
W. P. Westmoreland. 

The subjects discussed were: "The Work of the Sunday School 
Before the Revival Meeting." In the absence of J. W. Dickens, the 
speaker chosen, it was ably discussed by Rev. L. S. Ganies and oth- 
ers; "How to Use the Sunday School During the Revival Meeting," 
by Rev. L. J. Matthews; "The Responsibility of the Sunday School 
After the Revival," by L. A. Martin. 

The roll call showed nine churches represented, 65 present, 
among these six pastors, six superintendents, 14 teachers and 16 
deacons. 

It was decided to hold the next meeting with the Liberty church. 
The committee on nominations to report at the next meeting 
are Rev. L. S. Gaines, C. V. Teague and R. D. Covington. 

C. F. MOTSINGER, Superintendent 
MASKEY M. SMITH, Secretary 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1939 BAPTIST TRAINING 
UNION CONVENTIONS 

The Liberty Associational Training Union meeting was held at 
the Carolina Avenue Church on Sunday, January 29, 1939, at 2:30 
P. M. 

The meeting was opened with song service in charge of Fred 
Golightly. 

The devotional was led by Mr. Farthing from the Mills Home. 

The roll call of churches was in charge of Mr. Eddinger. 

It was quite an honor and deserved special recognition for om* 
infant Training Union, one week old, of Reid Street Mission Church, 
Thomasville, to be awarded the attendance banner for the highest 
average in attendance at their first Associational meeting. 

A special committee on place of next meeting reported Wallburg 
as the next meeting place. 

We were favored with two special numbers from the Orphanage 

trio. 

The two inspirational messages of the afternoon were, "Per- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



35 



sonal Obedience," by Mr. Romulus Skaggs, and "Making Our Re- 
ligion Vital," by Dr. W. K. McGee. 



The Liberty Associational Training Union met with the Wallburg 
Baptist Church on Sunday, April 27, 1939, 2:30 o'clock, with an at- 
tendance of more than 300. 

Song Service was led by Fred Golightly. The Devotional was led 
by Rev. Otis Lanning. 

The Roll Call and Regular Business Session was in charge of 
Mr. Eddinger. 

Miss Charlotte Tedder gave very fine reports on the Regional 
Convention in Marion, and the Associational Officers Convention 
which was held in Asheboro. 

Special Music was rendered by the New Friendship Chorus. 

The Place Committee composed of Messrs. Luther, Conrad, Mot- 
singer and Rev. Mr. Matthews, reported Churchland as the place of 
next meeting. 

The speakers of the afternoon, Rev. T. W. Bray and Rev. L. S. 
Gaines, spoke on "Strength For Living A Pure Life" and "The In- 
fluence Of A Christian Home", respectively, which were an inspira- 
tion to all who heard. 

The Attendance Banner was awarded to the Wallburg Training 
Union. 

Rev. Mr. Matthews led the closing prayer. 

RUBYE COONNELL, Secretary. 



36 



MINUTES OF THE 



Who Have Answered The Last Roll Call 
Since Last Session 

ABBOTTS CREEK— Mrs. Miimiei Green, Mr. Jacob Boden- 
heimer, Mrs. Minnie Hedgecock, Mrs. Jane Glascoe 
CAROLINA AVENUE— None 
CENTER HILL— Mr. Frank Lohr 

CHURCHLAND— Mrs. Elizabeth Barnes, Mr. J. M. McBride 
DENTON— Mrs. H. D. Smith, Deacon H. D. Smith, Mr. Dan 

Kindley 
ERLANGER— None 

HOLLOWAYS— Mr. D. R. Beanblossom, Mrs. D. H. Cross 
JERSEY— Mrs. lAnn Starr, Mr. J. H. Browning, Mrs. J. D. 
Feezor 

LEXINGTON— Deacon Albert Sheets, Mr. A. Love Yar- 
brough, Mrs. J. K. Hankins, Deacon J. O. Wagoner 

LIBERTY — Deacon J. A. Hepler, Deacon N. J. Kindley, 
Mrs. Mary A. Easter, Miss Susie Pullem. 

LICK CREEK— Mrs. Genie Cross, Mr. John Taylor, Mr. 
Walter Snider 

MILLS HOME— Mr. G. T. Jones 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mr. Fayette Swaim, Mr. George M. 

Scales, Mrs. J. A. Baker 
PLEASANT PLAINS— None 
REID STREET— None 

RfE^EDS — ^Miss Thama Morphis, Mrs. Susan Wood, Mrs. 

Francis Snider Beck, Mrs. Martha Wood, Mrs. 

Mary Branch 
RICH FORK— None 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mrs. J. Monroe Lovell 
SMITH GROVE— None 
SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. Margie Hubbard 
S TONERS GROVE— None 

SUMMERVILLE— Mr. Love Bean, Mrs. J. M. Daniel, Mrs. 

Joe Daniel, Mrs. Carrie Taylor, Mrs. Lecta Gnibb, 

Mrs. Sam Bailey 
TAYLORS GROVE— 

THOMASVILLE FIRST— Mrs. Belvin Lamb, Mrs. Jane Hoo- 
ver, Mr. John Everhart, Mr. Ed Nifong 
WALLBURG— Miss Minnie Wall 
WALTERS GROVE— None 
WELCOME— Mr. C. S. Haynes 

Signed: 

H. M. STROUP, J. A. NEILSON 
N. F. BRITT, MATTIE TEAGUE 
SALLIE McCRACKEN 

Committee On Obituaries. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 

ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE 
CHURCHES OF THE LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Name 



Barringer, Lewis 
Bray, T. W. 
Brit, N. F. 
Cox, J. A. 
Darnell. W. C. 
Dig-h, D. W. 
Eagle, E. P. 
Eddinger. C. C. 
Frank, A. L. 
Gaines, Louis S. 
Gallimore. A. R. 
Hopkins, W. B. 
Hunt. Howard 
Jarrett. J. F. 
Lanning. Otis 
Matthews. L. J. 
McGee, W. K. 
McMillan, J. A. 
Mumford, E. F. 
Neilson, J. A. 
Newton, J. D. 
Pickett. J. M. 
Roach, E. C. 
Stroup, H. M. 
Teague, N. C. 
Young. Chas S. 



Address 



Linwood. Rt. 1 
High Point, Rt. 
Thomasville 
Thomasville 
Mebane 

Salisbury, Rt. 4 
Salisbury 
Welcome 
Lexington, Rt. 6 
Lexington 
Lexington 
China Grove 
Denton 

Lexington. Rt. 6 

Thomasville 

Winston-Salem, R. 

Thomasville 

Thomasville 

High Point. Rt. 1 

Thomasville 

Thomasville 

Wingate 

Erlanger 

Denton 

Lexington, Rt. 3 
Lexington. Rt. 6 



Church of Which 
A Member 



Smith Grove 

Abbotts Creek 

Southside 

Carolina Avenue 

Summerville 

Center Hill 

Jersey 

Welcome 

Summerville 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Walters Grove 

Pleasant Plains 

Center Hill 

Reid Street 

Wallburg 

Thomasville First 

Mills Home 

Liberty 

Millf-- Home 

Thomasville First 

Taylors Grove 

Erlanger 

Denton 

Reeds 

Sheets Memorial 



Work 



.Member 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Member 

Pastor 

Missionary 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Member 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Member 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 



STUDENTS FOR THE MINISTRY 



Name 


Address 


Church of Which 
A Member 


Work 


Philpott, Harry 


Lexington, Va. 


Lexington 


student 



ASSISTANTS TO PASTORS OR EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 



Name 


Address 


Church of Which 
A Member 


Work 


Tedder, Charlotte 


Lexington 


Lexington 


Church Secretary 



MINISTERS ORDAINED DURING THE YEAR 

None. 

BAPTIST TRAINING UNIONS AND DIRECTORS, 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Church Name and Address 

Abbotts Creek Robert Palmer, Kernersville, Rt. 1 

Carolina Avenue Miss Ethel Carter, Thomasville, Aycock Ave. 

Center Hill Ulus Hunt, Lexington, Rt. 6 

Churchland V. K. Skeen, Jr., Denton, Rt. 1 

Erlanger T. H. Ayers, Erlanger 

Holloways Has no B. T. U. 

Jersey Harold Tate, Lexington, Rt. 6 

Lexington Miss Charlotte Tedder, Lexington, First Ave. 

Liberty N. P. Hooker, Thomasville 

Lick Creek Has no B. T. U. 



38 MINUTES OF THE 



Mills Home Paul S. Beys, Thomasville 

New Friendship Has no B, T. U. 

Oak Hill Memorial Has no B. T. U. 

Pleasant Plains Has no B. T. U. 

Reid Street Mr. J. J. Embry, Thomasville, Box 131 

Reeds Homer Craver, Lexington, Rt. 3 

Rich Fork Miss Hannah Eddinger, Thomasville 

Sheets Memorial Loyd R. Parr, Lexington, Wennonah Mills 

Smith Grove Has no B. T. U. 

Southside Tafton Rabon, Thomasville 

Stoners Grove L. E. Lookabill, Southmont 

Summer ville Has no B. T U. 

Taylors Grove Has no B. T. U. 

Thomasville First Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville 

Wallburg Miss Etta Teague, Wallburg 

Walters Grove Has no B. T. U. 

Welcome Has no B. T. U. 



PRESIDENTS OF LOCAL BROTHERHOODS 

None. 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES AND PRESIDENTS 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Church Name and Address 

Abbotts Creek Miss Blanche Traynham, High Point, Rt. 2 

Carolina Avenue Mrs. Willie Gilliam, Thomasville 

Center Hill Has no W. M. U. 

Churchland Mrs. Graham Barnes, Lin wood, Rt. 1 

Denton Mrs. W. T. Barnes, Denton, Rt. 1 

Erlanger Mrs. V. V. Everhart, Erlanger 

HoUoways No report, as to president 

Jersey Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Linwood 

Lexington Mrs. E. L. Morgan, Lexington, Rt. 1 

Liberty Mrs. I. Z. Clodfelter, Thomasville, Rt. 2 

Lick Creek Has no W. M. U. 

Mills Home Miss Jennie Ballard, Thomasville 

New Friendship Mrs. S. O. Hinkle, Winston- Salem, Rt. 5 

Reid Street Mrs. b. A. Renegar, Thomasville, Box 612 

Reeds Mrs. Alda Craver, Lexington, Rt. 3 

Rich Fork Mrs. W. M. Eddinger, Thomasville 

Sheets Memorial Mrs. W. O. Beck, Lexington, Rt. 

Smith Grove • Has no W. M. U. 

Southside Mrs. N. F. Britt, Thomasville 

Stoners Grove Mrs. Ramon Monsees, Southmont 

Summerville Has no W. M. U. 

Taylors Grove Has no W. M. U. 

Thomasville First Mrs. L. W. Stone, Thomasville 

Wallburg Miss Etta Teague, Wallbiu-g 

Walters Grove Has no W. M. U. 

Welcome Mrs. T. H. Mills, Welcome 

CHOIR DIRECTORS 
Church Name^ and lAddress 

Abbotts Creek Carey Davis, Kernersville, N. C, Rt. 1 

Carolina Avenue Wilber Gilliam, Thomasville, N. C. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 39 

Center Hill None 

Churchland Foy Beck, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5 

Denton Mrs. C. E. Cylatt, Denton, N. C. 

Erlanger Mrs. E. C. Putnam, Erlanger, N. C. 

Holloways G. C. Palmer, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Lexington Miss Louise Martin, Lexington, N. C. 

Liberty Mrs. Austin Sink, Thomasville, N. C. 

Lick Creek None 

Mills Home W. B. Lord, Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship Robert Hartman, W.-Salem, N. C, Rt 4 

Oak Hill Memorial None 

Pleasant Plains None 

Reid Street J. V. Luther, Thomasville, N. C. 

Reeds E. G. Pritts, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

Rich Fork None 

Sheets Memorial None 

Smith Grove Herman Grubb, Salisbury, N. C. 

Southside None 

Stoners Grove Miss Ruth HoUis, Southmont, N. C. 

Summer ville None 

Taylors Grove Mrs. Roy Owens, New London, N. C, Rt. 2 

Thomasville First Mrs. Alvah Boyles, Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg Paul Craven, Wallburg, N. C. 

Walters Grove E. R. Klass, Cid, N. C. 

Welcome Raymond Disher, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 1 



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LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



47 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Yr. 



1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1S42 
1843 
1844 
1845 
1846 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 



WHERE HELD 



IJamestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 

SBig- Creek 

IJamestown 
Liberty 
HollowaA's 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New FriendshiD 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big- Creek 
2Pine Meeting- H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

Summerville 

Lexington 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H 

High Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant Grove 

Denton 
5Piney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

Lexington 

Lick Creek 



PREACHER 



Geo. W. Purefcy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 

Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
L'nknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stokes 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Reid 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhait 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J. K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 
C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjam.in Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
If. ^Morton 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 



CLERK 



ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 

ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 



Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah AVill 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah "Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
By Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



48 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Yr 

1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
19 20 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



WHERE HELD 



Jersey 
2Pine Meeting- H 
New Friendship 
Thomasville 
Wallburg 
Denton 
Liberty 
Orphanag-e 
Abbotts Creek 
Stoners Grove 
Rich Fork 
Holloways 
Center Hill 
Wallburg 
Smith Grove 
Lexington 
Denton 

New Friendship 
Churchland 
Summerville 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds 
Liberty 
Rich Fork 
Thomasville 
Holloways 
Stoners Grove 
Abbotts Creek 
Denton 
Lexington 
Lick Creek 
Jersey 
Mills Home 
Reeds 
Churchland 
Denton 
Wallburg 



PREACHER 



W. A. Smith 
Geo. P. Harrill 
John R. Miller 
J. S. Farmer 
Dr. R. T. Vann 
M. L. Kesler 
S. D. Swaim 
O. A. Keller 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
M. L. Kesler 

G. A. Martin 

0. A. Keller 

1. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler 
R. E. White 

J. S. Hardaway 
M. L. Kesler 
W. A. Hough 
W. L. Barrs 
C. H. Trueblood 
C. A. Owens 
E. N. Gardner 

H. T. Penry 
M. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 
M. L. Kesler 

M. O. Alexander 

G. A. Martin 
E. F. Mumford 
W. L. Warfford 
E. C. Roach 

J. A. Neilson 
W. K. McGee 
John A. McMillan 

H. M. Stroupe 



MODERATOR 



James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets i 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
O. A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
G. W. Miller 
R. D. Covington 



CLERK 



Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 

4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now Wallburg 



1 



3 

Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
1940 



One Hundred and Eighth Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

CENTER HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 
LEXINGTON, N. C, R. F. D. No. 6 

September 3rd and 4fh, I940 



The next Session will be held September 9 & 10, 1941, with the 
New Friendship Baptist Church, Winston- Salem, N. C, 
R. P. D., No. 5 



i 



Liberty Baptist Association 

North Carolina 
1940 



One Hundred and Eighth Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

CENTER HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 
LEXINGTON, N. C, R. F. D. No. 6 

September 3rd and 4rfi, 19^0 



The next Session will be held September 9 & 10, 1941, with the 
New Friendship Baptist Church, Winston- Salem, N. C, 
R. F. D., No. 5 



INDEX 



Addresses 14-16-17-21 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 36 

Auxiliaries — Associational 3-4 25 to 33 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 4 

B. T. U. Associational Meetings 4-33 

Biblical Recorder Representatives 4-15 

Church Clerks 42 

Church Treasurers 43 

Committees: Promotion Executive 3 

Appointed by the Moderator 11 

Program for 1941 15 

To Bring Reports for 1941 18 

On Time, Place and Preacher 11 

Standing 3 

Constitution and By-Laws 6 

Deceased Members 35 

Directories: Associational 3-36 

Church 36 

Ordained Ministers 36 

Election of Officers 15 

Historical Table 45-46 

Messengers 5 

New Churches Admitted 23 

Order of Business 9 

Orphanage Representative 4-15 

Pastors of Association 36-38 

Proceedings, Associational 9 

Reports: Baptist Periodicals 10 

Committee on Obituaries 24-35 

B. T. U 19 

Committee on Nominations of Officers 15 

Committee on Resolutions 24 

Committee on Nominations of Reporters 16 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 22 

Committee on Credentials 23 

Digest of Church Letter 14 

Foreign Missions 13 

Hospitals 17 

Education 16 

Mills Home 10 

Ministerial Relief 18 

Public Morals 20 

State Missions 12 

Sunday Schools 21 

Treasurer's 23 

W. M. U. Work 20 

Sunday School Associational Meetings 31 

Statistical Tables 38 to 44 

Sermon, Annual 12 

Special Collection 21 

Sunday School Superintendents 39 

Visitors 11 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries, Officers and Meetings 3-25-41 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 



DIRECTORY OF ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 



Sam J. Smith, Treasurer Lexington, N. C. 

PROMOTION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Name Church — Address 

Rev. J. A. Neilson, Chairman Mills Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

J. P. Traynham, Abbotts Creek, High Point, N. C. 

B. L. Bostic Carolina Avenue, Thomasville, N. C. 

D. L. Tysinger Center Hill, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

L. E. Rickard, Churchland, Lin wood, N. C, Rt. 1 

A. L. Snider Denton, Denton, N. C. 

E. C. Haynes Erlanger, El-langer, N. C. 

J. W. Dickens, Jr Holloways, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

R. L. Palmer Jersey, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

C M. Wall, Sr Lexington, Lexington, N. C. 

B. J. May Liberty, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2 

B. C. Cole Lick Creek, High Rock, N. C. 

T. M. Lambeth New Friendship, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 

K. C. Lambeth Oak Hill Memorial, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2 

H. W. Hughes Pleasant Plaines, Jackson Hill, N. C. 

J. C. Leonard Reeds, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

Millard Wilson Reid Street, Thomasville, N. C. 

"Willie Bowers Rich Fork, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2 

Loyd Parr Sheets Memorial, Lexington, N. C. 

Lewis Barringer Smith Grove, Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 2 

L. E. Lookabill Stoners Grove, Southmont, N. C. 

Alex Snider Summerville, Denton, N. C, Rt. 1 

L. E. Teague Thomasville, Thomasville, N. C. 

J. W. Tuttle Wallburg, Wallburg, N. C. 

E. R. Klass Walters Grove, Cid, N. C. 

M. L. Craver Welcome, Welcome, N. C. 

Clyde Suggs Southside, Thomasville, N. C. 

Erlie Canick Mountain View, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 



ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY OR OTHER PAID EMPLOYEES 

None. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

None. 

ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
W. M. U. Convention 

Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Superintendent Lexington, N. C 

Mrs. C. M. Howell, Asst. Supt Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. N. C. Tfeague, Young People's Leader, .... Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, Sec'y & Treas Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 6 

Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Personal Service Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Annual Meeting was held April 19, 1940. See pages 25 to 30. 



4 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION 

C. F. Motsinger, Gen. Supt Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

J. W. Dickens, Associate Supt Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Maskey M. Smith, Sec'y & Treas Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 6 

Meeting was held July 7, 1940. See pages 31 and 32. 

B. T. U. CONVENTION 

W. R. Eddinger, Director Thomasville, N. C. 

Miss Charlotte Tedder, Associate Director Lexington, N. C. 

Miss Rubye Connell, Secretary & Treasurer Thomasville, N. C. 

Wilbur Lewis, Choister High Point, N. C. 

Mr. Carey Davis, Pianist High Point, N. C. 

Mr. Fred Golightly, Publicity Chairman Lexington, N. C 

Miss Etta Teague, Adult Leader Wallburg, N. C. 

Mr. J. R. Williams, Young People's Leader Thomasville, N. C. 

Miss Elizabeth Smith, Intermediate Leader Lexington, N. C. 

Mrs. Dozier Linden, Junior Leader Erlanger, N. C. 

Meeting was held June 27, 1940. See pages 33 and 34. 

ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE BROTHERHOOD 

None. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS LOCATED WITHIN THE BOUNDS 
OF THE ASSOCIATION 



The Mills Home 
ThomasvUle, N. C. 

I. G. Greer, General Superintendent Thomasville, N. C. 

B. W. Spillman, Chairman Kinston, N. C. 

R. D. Covington, Treasurer Thomasville, N. C. 

OFFICERS BAPTIST SCHOOLS STATE BOARDS 
AND INSTITUTIONS 
ResidiniT Within the Association 

Louis S. Gaines, Member General Board Lexington, N. C. 

Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C. 

Mrs. Jno. B. Lane, S. S. Field Worker Lexington, N. C 

W. K. McGee, Trustee Baptist Hospital Thomasville, N. C. 

C. M. Wall, Sr., Trustee Mars Hill College Lexington, N. C. 

Dr. C. R. Sharpe, Trustee Wake Forest College, Lexington, N. C. 

J. A. McMillan, Trustee Wake Forest College Thomasville, N. C. 

SPECIAL INFORMATION 

Rev. W. K. McGee, Associational Representative 

Biblical Recorder Thomasville, N. C. 

C. M. Wall, Sr., Associational Representative The 

Mills Home Lexington, N. C. 



Associational Representative of the Baptist Hospital: None. 

Associational Woman's Auxiliary: This organization meets an- 
nually, but not with and at the same time of the Association. The 
proceedings of their 1940 meeting are found on Page 25. 

Associational Sunday School and B. T. U. Conventions. These 
organizations do not meet at the same time and with The Association. 
The procedings of their 1940 Meetings will be found on Pages 
31 and 33, respectively. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



LIST OF MESSENGERS 
ABBOTTS CREEK— Rev. E. P. Mumford, D. S. Hayworth, Mrs. 

Grace Green, Floyd J. Teague. 
CAROLINA AVENUE— Evelyn Summey, Laura Joe Ingram, Billie 

Gilliam, Pauline Carter. 
CENTER HILL— Mrs. Will Owen, Mrs. Nyal Yarbrough, Loyd Owens, 

H. L. Miller. 

CHURCHLiAND— Glenn Barnes, L. E. Rickard, Mrs. Graham Barnes, 

Mrs. J. C. Sowers. 
DENTON— R. C. Wall, A. L. Snider, Dr. C. E. Clyatt. 
ERLANGER— Lee Vickers, Mrs. E. C. Roach, V. V. Everhart, Mrs. M. 

E. Perkins. 

HOLLOWAYS— G. C. Palmer, Frank Tysinger, W. E. Shirley. 
JERSEY— J. N. Penninger, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Reid Smith, Mr. and 
Mrs. R. A. Tate. 

LEXINGTON— Miss Roxie Sheets, O. S. Bellinger, J. D. Redwine 
Mrs. Sam J. Smith, Helen Smith, C. M. Wall, Mrs. D. F. 
Conrad, Rev. Louis S. Gaines, Sam J. Smith, Charlotte 
Tedder, P. A. Myers, Sr., Harris Cross, Mrs, O. K. Sharpe, 
Mary Joe Sharpe, Miss Crissie Smith, Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Mrs. 
Harris Cross, Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Lee, J. L. Bullard. 

LICK CREEK— David Kinney, Henry McDonald, J. C. Reid. 

MILLS HOME — H. G. Earley, Romulus Skaggs, Miss Sarah Elmore, 
Mrs. E. Lee Fox. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— W. A. Smith, Elmer Snider, Mrs. A. G. Mc- 
Cormick. 

OAK GROVE S. S.— J. L. Jones, Mrs. J. R. Owens. 
OAK HILL MEMORIAL— K. C. Lambeth, Mrs. Penn Fuller, Mrs. 
Ray Underwood. 

PLEASANT PLAINES— Mr. H. W. Hughes, Mrs. H. W. Hughes, Mrs 
Grady Hunt. 

REEDS— J. C. Leonard, J. W. Myers, Mrs. Ralph Craver, Mrs. I. A. 
Myers. 

REID STREET^Mrs. S. A. Renegar, C. E. Perry, Rev. H. Otis Lan- 
ning. 

RICH FORK— Willie Bowers, Wilford Eddinger, Hoyle Tate, Mrs. 
Sallie Orednder. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Rev. C. S. Young, Mrs. C. S. Young, Miss 

Mary Swing, W. E. Anderson. 
SMITH GROVE— Mrs. W. W. Scott, Miss Gustie Orrell, I. E. Lassiter. 

E. W. Koonts. 
SOUTHSIDE— 

STONERS GROVE— Loyd Lookabill, Mrs. J. C. Thompson, Hugh 
Warfford, J. C. Thompson. 

SUMMERVILLE— Earlie Gallimore, George Tysinger, A. L. Frank, 
E. L. Bean. 

TAYLORS GROVE— Mrs. Plata Russell, Mrs. Delia Cranford, Ray 
Owens. 

THOMASVILLE— Mr. and Mrs. Lacy Dameron, L. W. Hansel, Mrs. 
Ruby Boaze, Mrs. W. K. McGee, Prevette Westmoreland, Mrs. 



6 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



R. S. Green, Mrs. R. G. Jennings. 
WALLBURG— Roby C. Clodfelter, Maskey M. Smith, Irvin James. 
WALTERS GROVE— Mrs. Jessie Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Byerly, 

Mrs. Carl Gallimore, Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Klass. 
WELCOME— Mrs. C. C. Eddinger, Mrs. W. S. Disher, W. S. Disher, 

M. L. Craver. 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 
NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

OBJECTS 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish 
the gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the 
association, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 
MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the 
association, pastors of the churches in the association, and messen- 
gers from the churches. Each shall be entitled to three messengers 
and one additional messenger for every 50 members or fraction 
thereof over and above 100 member 

OFFICERS 

Article. 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, 
vice-moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected 
each year by the association at its annual meeting and shall hold 
office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in like organiza- 
tions, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARD AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee 
each year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel 
preached in all parts of the association, and to attend to all business 
in the association between the session and to make such reports as 
they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the association. The 
association may appoint or elect such other boards or committees 
from time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually on Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request 
of the Executive Committet; change the time or the place of meeting 
of this association when it may be deemed by him not expedint to 
meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive 
Committee may fill any vacancy occurring between meeting of the 
association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article. 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular 
session of the association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
Order for Parliamentary Authority. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



STANDING RESOLUTIONS 
CHURCHES NOT CONTRIBUTING TO BENEVOLENCES 

Churches that fail to contribute to benevolences inasmuch as the 
Liberty Association has as its chief function the propagation of a 
missionary spirit among our people, and inasmuch as a church which 
fails to contribute to beneficences outside its local budget fails to 
justify its claim of being a missionary Baptist church, we therefore 
recommend that a church which contributes nothing to missionary 
objects beyond its borders have the fellowship of the association 
removed from it, if after a year from its report to the associaton it 
shows no improvement in its gifts. 

See page 12, 1928 Minutes. 

DATE OF CLOSING ASSOCIATIONAL YEAR CHANGED 

In order that the committee on the Digest of Church Letters 
might have their report ready for the first day of the Association in 
the future, Rev. Walter Warfford, of Lexington, makes motion that 
our Association year close with the last Sunday in August each year, 
and that immediately after this date the different church clerks 
prepare their letters and mail them to the Clerk of the Association. 

See page 29, 1931 Minutes. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



PROCEEDINGS 

OP THE 

ONE HUNDRED EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OP THE 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 
CENTER HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 
R. F. D. No. 6, Lexington, N. C. 

September 3rd and 4th, 1940. 



TUESDAY 

MORNING SESSION SEPT. 3, 1940 

1. On Tuesday, September 3, 1940, at 9:45 A. M. The Liberty 
Baptist Association assembled in the One Hundred Eighth Annual 
Session with the Center Hill Baptist Church, Lexington, N. C, R. 
P. D. No. 6. 

2. Rev. D. W. Digh, Pastor of the church at Center Hill after 
the singing of two songs which were led by L. W. Hansel of the 
Thomafiville church, conducted the Opening Devotional. 

3. At 10:00 A. M. R. D, Covington, the Moderator, called the 
Body to order for the transaction of business. 

REPORT OF THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

4. The report of the Program Committee was read by Sam J. 
Smith and was adopted. 

FIRST DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. D. W. Digh 

10:00 Report of Program Committee Sam J. Smith 

10:10 Christian Literature Rev. L. J. Matthews 

10:40 Baptist Orphanage D. S. Hay worth 

11:15 Roll Call; Recognition of New Pastors and Visitors; Appoint- 
ment of Committees by Moderator 

11:40 Annual Sermon Rev. L. S. Gaines 

12:30 Lunch 

APTERNOON 

2:00 Praise and Worship Rev. E. C. Roach 

2:15 Co-Operative Program 

1. State Missions W. H. Lomax 

2. Home Missions Mrs. W. A. Shoaf 

3. Poreign Missions Mrs. C. M. Howell 

2:35 Address Mr. M. A. Huggins, State Secretary 

3:25 State of Churches Dr. W. H. MoGee 

1. Digest of church letters (Blackboard) 

2. Associational goals for next year. 

SECOND DAY 

9:45 Praise and Worship Rev. J. A. Neilson 



10 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



10:00 
10:20 
11:00 
11:35 
12:00 



Election of Officers — Business 

Christian Education 

Baptist Hospital 

Ministerial Relief 

Lunch 



Rev. J. A. McMillan 

Rev. N. C. Teague 

C. M. Wail 



AFTERNOON 



1:45 
2:00 
2:30 
3:00 
3:30 
4:00 



Praise and Worship 

Womans Missionary Union 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement 

Sunday Schools 

B. T. U 

Reports of Committees, etc. 



Miss Sallie McCracken 



Rev. H. M. Stroup 



J. W. Dickens 

Wilford Eddinger 



Rev. T. W. Bray 



R. D. Covington, Moderator 
G. W. Miller, Vice-Moderator 
Sam J. Smith, Clerk and Treas 



CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 



5. The report on Christian Literature in the absence of Rev. L. 
J. Matthews due to sickness was omitted. 

An address on Christian Publications was brought by David Mor- 
gan, representative of The Biblical Recorder of Raleigh, N. C. 

Further remarks were made on this subject by Dr. W. K. McGee 
Associational Representative of The Biblical Recorder. 



6. The report on the Mills Home was brought by Mr. D. S. 
Hay worth of the Abbotts Creek church, and was adopted. 

A short address on the work of the Orphanage was made by 
Mr. I. G. Greer, Superintendent of that institution. 

A further discussion of the Home was made by Dr. W. B. Spill- 
man, Chairman of the Board of Trustees. 

Miss Ruby Lions, Miss Ruth Lyons and Miss Eloise Stansel 
three High School girls from the Home, were introduced by Dr. 
Greer, and delighted the audience as they sang "I Am a Child of 
The King." 

Mrs. Alison, a matron in the Home presented four small tots, 
from The Home, who in a skilled manner rendered several songs and 
Scripture readings. 

Jack Strayhom, an 11 -year boy from the Home and Miss 
Alma Rhinehardt, who is connected with The Orphanage office, 
both made short and interesting talks to the audience. 

Mr. Greer also thanks C. M. Wall for the magnificent gift he 
had given the Orphanage since last meeting of the Association, 
namely a large farm located at Wallburg, N. C. 

"The children who compose the population of the Baptist 
Orphanage of North Carolina may be classified under three heads: 
full orphans, half orphans and victims of dessertion and wrecked 
homes. These children are being cared for by three well organized 
methods of child caring agencies: Mothers Aid, boarding homes and 
the Orphanage proper. In addition to these our case workers are 
rendering a fine service by helping children and parents make ad- 
justments with their neighbors and relatives. 

The demand upon the Orphanage authorities have never been 
greater. They receive upon an average 45 applications every month 
during the year. No matter how urgent the demands, however, the 



BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



policy of the Orphanage leaders is not to make special appeals. 
Special appeals for other causes may come and special appeals may 
go, but this constant stream of human want must go on day after 
day and year after year until the purpose of Christ through His 
church has been fulfilled. 

The past year was one of the best in the history of the Orphan- 
age, but imperative needs continue to increase. The care of the 
orphan child was intrusted to us by Christ himself. We cannot shun 
this Christian responsibility and claim to be practicing "pure re- 
ligion." When appeals are made to Orphanage authorties they have 
nowhere to go, indeed, they do not want any place to go for financial 
support other than individuals, Sunday schools and churches. The 
plan is simple. 

"We suggest as a goal for the association for next year: a 
monthly contribution from each church or Sunday school, gifts of 
produce in season, a real Thanksgiving offering in November and a 
club of Charity and Children in each Sunday school. In order to 
reach this goal we recommend that an Orphanage representative be 
appointed by this body to contact every Sunday school and church 
in the association. "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the 
least of these, ye have done it unto me." 

D. S. HAYWORTH. 

ROLL CALL OF THE CHURCHES 

7. The Roll Call of the churches made by Sam J. Smith showed 
that all of the churches were represented. 

NEW MINISTERS RECOGNIZED 

8. The following new pastors of churches in the Association were 
recognized at this time: 

Rev. Farrell F. James, pastor of the Liberty Church. 

VISITORS RECOGNIZED 

9. The following visitors were recognized: 

David Morgan, from the Central Association, representing The 
Biblical Recorder; Mrs. B. W. Spillman, Kinston, N. C, from the 
Neuse Association and president of the W. M. U. at the Kennedy 
Home at Kinston, N. C; Dr. B. W. Spillman, of the Neuse Association 
and Field Representative of the Sunday School Board at Nashville, 
Term., and Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Renegar of the Yadkin Association. 

COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

10. The Moderator named the following committees and asked 
them to serve in their respective duties: 

(1) FINANCE— Rev. N. F. Britt, Chairman; Rev. J. A. Cox, W. 
A. Smith, L. E. Teague, Ray Owen, E. R. Klass, K. C. Lambeth. 

(2) TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER— Rev. N. C. Teague, Chair- 
man; Rev. Chas. S. Young, H. L. Miller, R. C. Wall, Rev. 
E. F. Mumford, L. E. Rickard, W. E. Shirley. 

(3) TO NAME PERSONS TO BRING THE REPORTS FOR 
NEXT YEAR— 'Rev. L. S. Gaines, Chairman; Rev. H. M. 
Stroup, Maskey M. Smith, W. S. Disher, H. G. Early, Miss 
Roxie Sheets, E. M. Koonts. 

(4) TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1941— Rev. E. C. Roach, 
Chairman; Rev. J. A. Neilson, A. L. Snider, Mrs. S. A. Rene- 
gar, D. S. Hayworth, C. M. Wall, Sr., J. C. Reid. 



12 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



(5) ON OBITUARIES— Rev. L, J. Matthews, Chairman; Rev. J. 
A. McMillan, Miss Charlotte Tedder, J. C. Leonard, Mrs. E. C. 
Roach, J. N. Penniger, Jr., Mrs. Lois Sink. 

(6) ON RESOLUTIONS— Rev. T. W. Bray, Chairman; Rev. Otis 
Lanning, Clyde Suggs, W. E. Anderson, Loyd Lookabill, A. L. 
Frank, Willie Gilliam. 

(7) ON CREDENTIALS— Rev. W. K. McGee, Chairman; Rev. D. 
W. Digh, Miss Sallie McCracken, Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Mrs. 
D. F. Conrad, G. C. Palmer. 

R. D. COVINGTON, 

Moderator. 

ANNUAL SERMON 

11. Rev. N. C. Teague, before delivery of the Sermon read Phil- 
lipians I — 1:11, and led the body in prayer. 

The Sermon was delivered by Rev. Louis S. Gaines, pastor of the 
Lexington First Church. 

His subject was "Some Vital Matters in Our Religion." 
His Text being taken from Phillipians 1:9. 

ADJOURNMENT 

12. The Association adjourned at 12:15 to reconvene again at 
2:00 P. M. 

TUESDAY 

AFTERNOON SESSION 
DEVOTIONAL 

13. The afternoon Devotional was led by Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor 
of the Erlanger church. 

"What Will My Answ^er Be When Jesus Beacons Me Home," was 
tenderly rendered by Miss Annie Chism, of Thomasville, N. C. 

THANKS BY PASTOR FOR ASSISTANCE IN ENTERTAINING 

14. Rev. D. W. Digh, pastor of the host church, thanked the mem- 
bers of the Cotton Grove Methodist church and other churches in the 
vicinity for their assistance in helping to feed the large congregation 
for dinner. 

CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM 

15. In the absence of W. H. Lomax, who wrote the report on the 
State Missions, his report was read by Rev. N. C. Teague. 

The report on Foreign Missions written by Mrs. C. M. Howell 
was read by Rev. J. A. Neilson. They were both adopted. 

STATE MISSIONS 

Mr. Alexander and Mr. Pifes are our State Missioners. They 
visit during the year scores of churches, talking to the people about 
w^orship, stewardship and missions; seeking to bring the people to 
acknowledge and demonstrate the Lordship of Jesus. 

We have next Rev. W. C. Somerville and his associates, Rev. D. 
C. Clinton, leaders of the Negro Baptists of the State. They are 
seeking to build into the Negro life of the state. Christian ideals. 

Many churches are aided by the state board, where the people 
are unable to provide a living income for a pastor. 

Rev. E. M. Harris, located at Aberdeen, preaches to the girls at 
Samarcand and ministers to the patients at the State Sanatorium 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



In the west, Rev. Guy Marlowe at Western North Carolina Sana- 
torium and Rev. Wayne Williams at Oteen, the Veteran's Hospital. 

In our Sunday school department and B. T. U. we have Mr. 
Crouch, Mr, Morgan and Mr. Brooks. Mr. Morgan doing a great 
work in the association- wide Sunday School Enlargement Campaign. 
Mr. Brooks doing similar work in the B. T. U. Mr. Crouch is seeking 
to provide a normal church life for the large number of Baptist 
boys and girls at Chapel Hill, State College and other State schools. 

Dr. Binkley and Dr. Easley are teaching Bible at Wake Forest 
College where many men and women who for the first time in their 
lives are having an opportunity for a thorough course in Bible. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lunford are at Penbroke, where for a number of 
years they have been working with the Indians in Roberson County. 

Several churches have been partly built out of State Mission 
funds. We might mention Chapel Hill, Boone, Greensboro, Raleigh 
and many others. 

If our people could get a new conception of the whole scope and 
extent of oiu- State Mission activities and realize in all those activi- 
ties there is only one fundamental purpose in view. That being, 
to make Christ known and reign in the lives of North Carolina 
Baptists. I am sure that we would give more thorough the Co- 
operative Program and make a special effort through W. M. U. in 
September and throughout the Sundays in October. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. H. LOMAX. 

FOREIGN MISSION REPORT 

Near a century ago, amidst fear and trembling, our Baptist fore- 
fathers launched the great Southern Foreign Mission enterprise. 

Today after ninety-five years of existence, some lean, others fat, 
we have mission stations in sixteen countries, with a total of 1,883 
churches, and 3,269 out stations. It seems that world conditions are 
bringing the people to a knowledge of their need for God — and the 
year 1939 report 18,606 baptisms, more than any one year in the 
history of foreign missions. China alone reports 7,000 baptisms. 
There are in these sixteen countries, 455 missionaries actively en- 
gaged in work and sixty-nine missionaries emeritus, and tv/enty-six 
new missionaries have been appointed this year. 

Comparison as to gifts in a seven-year period — 1939 receipts 
total $1,149,251.87, an increase over 1933 of $268,678.16. At that time 
there was a debt hanging over the board of $1,110,000, the debt has 
been decreased and now stands at $245,000. 

In seven years $865,000 has been paid on the principal of the debt 
and $210,289.26 in interest, a total of $1,075,289,16. 

In 1933 the Woman's Missionary Union gave $159,079.73 for the 
Lottie Moon Christmas Offering; in 1939 it contributed $330,424.70, 

The supreme hour of opportunity has come in South America, 
Influence and prestige of the United States have suddenly taken on 
enormous proportions in Latin America. 

There are five or six states in Brazil larger than Texas — without 
a Baptist Missionary. 

The work in Mexico is growing and the people are more eager 
to know of Christ — the Saviour of the world — the doors are opening 
wider and people are attending "The Mission"— more than ever there 
are few restrictions on the Christian people in this Catholic ridden 
country South of the United States. 



14 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



In Africa the work is growing in a marvelous way, and the plea 
for missionary recruits is coming with ever-increasing force. Nigenia 
sorely needs fifty new missionaries next year. 

The British Baptist Missionary Society— the oldest Baptist Mis- 
sionary Society in the world — appealed to Southern Baptists to rally 
to the aid of its Foreign Mission work in its hour of great distress. 
We should be grateful for the privilege of rallying quickly and gen- 
erously to the help of these British Baptists throughout the world. 

Dr. Maddry tells us of the losses of our Mission Field, by con- 
quets. Recently we lost 20,000 Baptists in Bessarabia, then we have 
losses in Russia, Spain, Germany, Italy, France, and most of Europe. 
A loss of Japanese conquered territory in China and sixty million 
untouchables in India, and $600,000 worth of property in China. 
Eight missionaries have "fallen on sleep" this year. 

Listen to this quotation taken from Dr. Maddry: 

"In the early years of the life of the Foreign Mission Board, 
the oldest states of the Convention, those along the Atlantic Sea- 
board, furnished most of the missionaries of our Board. These mis- 
sionaries were the pioneers and trail blazers for eleven hundred other 
heroes and martyrs who were to follow in their train. 

"Such were Shuck, Yates, Hartwell, Graves, Holmes, Simmons. 
Green, Bryan, Miss Moon, and a host of others. But for some un- 
known reason, soon after the turn of the century, the number of 
volunteers for the Foreign Field from the older states of the Con- 
vention began to fall off, and the members from the new and ex- 
panding West and Southwest began to increase. Within recent 
years far more than half of our missionary candidates come from 
the states West of the River. For a well balanced and truly repre- 
sentative missionary program, we need missionary candidates from 
all the states." 

In the words of Dr. L. R. Scarborough — "Let's go on and out 
and up and forward." 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. C. M. HOWELL. 

iiU)DRESS BY REV. A. R. GALLIMORE 

15. Rev. A. R. Gallimore, a Missionary from China, at home on a 
fiu-lough, presented the audience with an interesting address and 
comments on the conditions in China and asked for the prayers of 
everyone as he returns to the stricken war area of China. 

ADDRESS BY. DR. M. A. MUGGINS 

17. After a prayer by Rev. E. F. Mumford, Dr. M. A. Huggins, Sec- 
retary of the Baptist State Convention, addressed the Association 
on the different benevolent objects of the Convention. He especially 
emphasized the following objects: aid to the British Missionaries, 
the enlargement of the Hospital at Winston- Salem, the erection of 
the proposed chapel at Wake Forest College. 

DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS 

18. The Digest of Church Letters was made by Dr. W. K. McGee, 
pastor of the First church at Thomasville. He used a black board, 
which had been prepared by the Clerk of the Association and made 
a complete comparison of the work each church had done this year 
and the work it did last year. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSCMZilATION 



15 



ADJOURNMENT 

19. After a prayer by Dr. W. K. McGee- the body adjourned until 
tomorrow at 9:45 A. M. 

THE SECOND DAY 
WEDNESDAY 

MORNING SESSION SEPT. 4, 1940, 9:45 A. M. 

20. The Morning Devotional was led by Rev. J. A. Neilson, pastor 
of the Mills Home church. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

21. Rev. E. C. Roach, chairman of the committee heretofore ap- 
pointed to nominate officers, read the recommendation, which was 
as follows: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1941 

We recommend: 

For Moderator— R. D. Covington. 

For Vice Moderator^G. W. Miller. 

For Clerk and Treasurer — Sam J. Smith. 

Program Committee for 1941— The Moderator and Clerk of the 
Association and the pastor of the church entertaining the 1941 
session. 

Orphanage Representative — C. M. Wall, Sr. 

Chairman of the Executive Committee— J. A. Neilson. 

Associational Biblical Recorder Representative— W. K. McGee 

Associational Sunday School Superintendent — C. F. Motsinger. 

Director of Associational B. T. U.— W. R. Eddinger. 

E. C. ROACH, 
J. A. NEILSON, 
A. L. SNIDER, 
J. C. REID, 

C. M. WALL, 

D. S. HAYWORTH, 
MRS. S. A. RENEGAR, 
Committee On Nominations 

Mr. C. M. Wall, Sr., made motion that Rev. E. C. Roach cast 
the ballot of the Association for R. D. Covington for Moderator and 
for Sam J. Smith for Clerk. The motion was adopted and Rev. 
Roach cast the ballot as directed. The remainder of the report was 
adopted. 

Mr. Covington, who has been Moderator for six years expressed 
to the body his appreciation for the confidence shown, as did Sam J. 
Smith, who was elected clerk for the eighteenth time. 

A VOTE OF SYMPATHY 

22. Upon motion it was voted by the association that the clerk of 
the Association write and send to G. W. Miller, Vice Moderator of the 
body and to Rev. L. J. Matthews, pastor of the Wallburg and New 
Friendship churches a vote of well wishes and sympathy due to the 
fact that they were detained from attendance owing to sickness. 

23. The Committee heretofore appointed by the Moderator to name 



16 



I.IBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



persons to bring the reports for next year, made their report which 
was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NAME PERSONS TO BRING THE 
REPORTS NEXT YEAR 

We recommend to the Association the following: 



NAME & OBJECT ADDRESS 

Baptist Hospital — B. J. May Rt. 2, Lexington 

B. T. U.— Williford Eddinger Thomasville 

Christian Education — Dr. W. K. McGee Thomasville 

Home Missions — Mrs. S. O. Hinkle Rt. 5, Winston-Salem 

Foreign Missions— Rev. H. M. Stroup Denton 

Ministerial Relief — Rev. D. W. Digh Rt. 4, Salisbury 

Mills Home— Rev. L. J. Matthews Rt. 5, Winston- Salem 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement — 

Rev. N. C. Teague Rt. 3, Lexington 

Religious Literature— Rev. T. B. Bray Rt. 2, High Point 

Digest of Church Letters and State of 

the Churches— Rev. J. A. Neilson Thomasville 

State Missions — Jesse W. Dickens Rt. 6, Lexington 

W. M. U.— Mrs. Louis S. Gaines Lexington 



LOUIS S. GAINES, 
MISS ROXIE SHEETS, 
MASKEY SMITH, 

Committee. 

24. Rev. J. A. McMillan, Editor of Charity and Children, brought the 
report on Christian Education, which was adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

No factor of organized Baptist work in North Carolina has been 
more powerful in the development of the Denomination than our 
Christian schools and colleges. When Baptists of North Carolina 
first organized for definite work they began by establishing a school 
for the education of young preachers. We have today seven colleges 
that are opening their doors at this time to the largest number of 
students ever enrolled in them. We call the roll not that every 
school is not known and loved but because we like to call the names 
of them: Wake Forest, Meredith, Chowan, Mars Hill, Campbell, Win- 
gate and Boiling Springs. 

The Baptist State Convention at its last session authorized a 
campaign for money for the erection of a Chapel building on the 
campus of Wake Forest Coilege. We think that this is the first 
building ever undertaken by the Convention for Wake Forest College. 
We heartily approve of the action of the Convention and urge every 
church of the Liberty Association to take a generous part in the 
erection of the building. We think that this is the definite work of 
the Baptists of the State in the field of Christian Education this 
year. 

JOHN ARCH MCMILLAN. 

ADDRESS ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

25. Dr. O. T. Binkley, Professor of Bible at Wake Forest College, de- 
livered before the Association an address on Christian Education, 
which was heard with universal interest and approval. 

His subject was, "You Have Not Passed Hitherto Before." 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



26. The report on the Hospital was read by Rev. N. C. Teague, 
pastor of the Reeds and Churchland churches. The report was 
adopted. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Jesus by precept and example taught us to care for the sick of 
the world. The story of the Good Samaritan is an illustration from 
the lips of Jesus. In the judgment of the nations as recorded in 
Matt. 25, the righteous were told, "I was sick, and ye visited me"; 
the unrighteous heard, "I was sick, and in prison, and ye visited me- 
not." The sick were brought and placed before Jesus, and not one 
ever went away without the help desired. Jesus truly went about 
doing good, both to the bodies and souls of people. 

Our Baptist Hospital, in Winston -Salem, closed its 17th year of 
service on June 30, 1940. During these years more than 50,000 sick 
people from all parts of our state have been ministered to. People 
from every walk of life have received blessing from our hospital; 
1200 or more mothers saved for their homes and children each year; 
pastors, ministerial students, old and penniless preachers, mission- 
aries, orphan boys and girls ministered to; of the 4500 or more cared 
for in the last 12 months 1500 were service or free patients. The 
testimonies of those who have gone to our hospital speak in loudest 
praise of the high type of Christian service rendered. The training 
of Christian nurses is also a great service rendered by our hospital. 

The tragedy of overcrowding and turning away the sick for lack 
of room will soon be remedied, we believe. Plans have been made 
and money raised to enlarge the hospital to around 300 beds. Also, 
the Medical School of Wake Forest College will be built on the 
hospital grounds. With these additions accomplished we envision a 
great House of Hope for multiplied thousands of North Carolina sick 
people. 

We urge our people to patronize this great hospital. Those who 
can pay will make it possible for more to be cared for who cannot 
pay. We will find the best of equipment and Christian service. We 
recommend that our W. M. U. organizations continue their donations 
of linen, etc., for the hospital. Also, we ask that all of the churches 
without a single exception (we had only one exception last year) 
give as large a Mother's Day offering as possible. North, Carolina 
Baptists gave $23,000 last May; let us give $30,000 next May. 

If we are faithful to the sick in Jesus' name, I believe Jesus 
will say "well done" in regard to our healing ministry along with 
preaching, teaching, and ministering to the old and the orphan. 

Respectfully submitted, 
N. C. TEAGUE. 

Some remarks on the work of the Hospital were made by Rev. 
Teague and Mrs. B. F. Duncum, of the Churchland church. 

ADDRESS BY SMITH HAGERMAN 

Mr. Sm.ith Hagerman, Superintendent of the Baptist Hospital at 
Winston-Salem, N. C, brought a very educational address on the 
work and accomplishment of the Hospital, and what it would be 
after the present enlargement program is completed and the Bow- 
man Gray, Wake Forest Medical School is added to it. 

27. The report on Ministerial Relief, which was prepared by C. M. 
Wall, Sr., was read by Sam J. Smith. 



18 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Upon motion to adopt, the report was discussed by C. M. Wall 
and was adopted. 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

Our greatest task immediately before us is to enlist all our pas- 
tors in the Ministers Retirement Plan. There are more than 20,000 
ordained Baptist ministers in the South. Of these certainly there 
must be 12,000 who are in active service, and we have about 4,000 
of these participating in the Ministers Retirement Plan. It can read- 
ily be seen there is a great task before us! We should not approach 
this task faint-heartedly. 

The Editor of the Western Recorder had this to say in the 
Christmas number of that paper: "In congratulating Secretary T. J. 
Watts on the fine work of the Relief Board, it would be unfortunate 
to leave the impression that the Board's success will enable it to 
rast on its oars. As a matter of fact, the success achieved largely 
opens up the need and opportunity for hard work for the Board. It 
will be months or years before the plans adopted can possibly yield 
maximum results, and the full continuance of the large service un- 
dertaken will require sustained care and effort." 

Another reason why the Ministers Retirement Plan of the States 
should be promoted with the greatest vigor is that the full success of 
these State plans, all of them, is predicted on the participation in 
them of the great majority of their pastors and churches. Every 
member of the large Relief and Annuity Board family can help by 
encouraging others who are not members to join the plan open to 
him or her. We have plans that will take care of every employee of 
every Baptist church, board and institution in the Southern Conven- 
tion. We are strong believers in Social Security, and therefore are 
very anxious for all those working for the denomination to be en- 
listed in one of our annuity plans. 

Then, many can help by leaving money for the work of the 
Board in their wills. Never in the history of our Board has it been 
more needful than at present for the friends of its work to remember 
the Relief and Annuity Board in this way. If the pastors of our 
churches will see to it that information concerning the work of the 
Board is given to their members who have means with an occasional 
and timely suggestion concerning the matter of remembering this 
Board in their wills, many gifts may be expected that otherwise would 
go to less needy causes. We have some friends here and there who 
have done just this thing and we know of wills that are now in 
existence that will later on yield returns in money to the Relief and 
Annuity Board. What we need is that there shall be many more 
such cases. Many people die without leaving wills and many others 
make wills that show forgetfulness of interests of the Master's King- 
dom. Our pastors can help to correct this. 

CM. WALL — ^Committee. 

ADJOURNMENT 

28. The Association adjourned at 12:30 P. M. to reconvene again 
at 1:45 P. M. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

DEVOTIONAL 

29. The Afternoon Devotional was conducted by Rev. E. F. Eagle, 
pastor of the Jersey church. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



Miss Annie Chism rendering in song "I Am Satisfied With Jesus." 

30. The report on B. T. U. was brought by Williford Eddinger. 
Upon motion to adopt, the report was discussed by Mr. Eddinger, 

Miss Charlotte Tedder and Rev. Clyde Eddinger and was adopted. 

TRAINING UNION REPORT 

In 1940 we have thought more, heard more and done more 
training than we have during the last 22 years combined. In view 
of this fact, it is no less important for the church to have a well 
defined program of training to combat the evil forces that endanger 
our moral and spiritual life, than it is for our nation to have a well 
defined program of defense for combating the forces of those that 
would deprive us of our liberty, pursuit of happiness and yea, even 
our religious freedom. 

Those of us who have had an opportunity to see the training 
imion work from an associational point of view have seen great 
strides made. Possibly, not from the standpoint of numbers but in 
efficiency and a heart's desire to do the job of training union work 
the CHRIST WAY. 

Last year we reported 79 unions organized and at work in our 
association with a combined membership of 1067. 

I venture to say the greatest help and the greatest inspiration 
that has ever come into the lives of the Baptist yoimg people in our 
Association was experienced this summer from July 13th through 
20th when Mr. Nathan C. Brooks, Jr., Secretary of our State Train- 
ing Union work brought 25 of his state workers into 16 of our 
churches and had a week of intensive study, worship and training 
One church furnished their own workers which made a total of 17 
churches participating in the week of training. At this time three 
churches set up complete new organizations which are now function- 
ing and doing a fine piece of work for the Master. 

This year we have organized nine new unions. 

We have a total of 88 unions, not including story hour, with a 
membership of 1297, a net gain of 232 members. Eleven story hour 
groups composed of 106 members with their respective leaders are 
each Sunday night learning more about Jesus. 

It is fitting just here I think for us to pause and thank the 
Mills Home for so graciously entertaining the Association and all the 
state workers during the week of enlargement this summer. May we 
say again, thanks. 

During the year our associational meetings have been well at- 
tended and a greater amount of interest has been shown in the work. 
As a result of this manifestation of interest we have been able to 
plan and maintain more satisfactory and inspiring programs. 

Realizing the immensity of the task that lies before us we are 
ever conscious of the need of incessant prayer for strength and 
courage to carry on. Asking that you remember every officer and 
training union member in our Association in your prayers, we 
humbly submit this report. 

W. R. EDDINGER, 
Training Union Director. 

31. The report on W. M. U. was brought by Miss Sallie MoCracken 
Upon motion to adopt the report, short talks on the W, M. U. work 
were made by Miss McCracken and Mrs. L. S. Gaines, after which 
the report was adopted. 



20 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK . 

The Woman's Missionary Union of North Carolina has heretofore 
been composed of five divisions, the Liberty being one of the 26 
associations in the Charlotte Division. The state work has been re- 
arranged and now there are ten divisions instead of five. We are 
now linked up with the Greensboro Division which is composed of the 
Liberty, Piedmont, Pilot Mountain, Randolph and Rowan Associations. 
It is hoped that much more may be accomplished by having these 
smaller groups. The Liberty had the good fortune to fall into the 
group that retained the capable leader of the former Charlotte Divi- 
sion, Mrs. B. K. Mason. The first annual meeting of this new 
Greensboro Division will meet with the Liberty Union at the Mills 
Home in October. 

The annual meeting of the Liberty Woman's Missionary Union 
was held with the Abbotts Creek church in April. The reports from 
all departments were very encouraging and showed advancement 
along all lines. The mission study report was by far the best in the 
history of the organization. The young people's work is advancing 
under the capable leadership of Mrs. N. C. Teague. Contributions for 
all objects last year, outside of local expenses amounted to $7,636.10. 
This year it was of special interest to the entire group to have Miss 
Elizabeth Hale, of China, daughter of one of our former Lexington 
pastors, Dr. Fred Hale, bring the missionary message. Miss Hale's 
mother, who now lives in South Boston, Va., was also a most welcome 
guest at the meeting. A number of societies and some unions had 
reached the standards set for such organizations, but for the first 
time all points in the associational standard were reached. Mrs. L. S 
Gaines, who had for a number of years served as a most enthusiastic 
mission study leader, was elected Superintendent of the Liberty 
Woman's Missionary Union and has already taken up her duties In 
that capacity. 

Added to the regular objects supported through the years the 
women of the South are undertaking the removal and rebuilding of 
the Training School at Louisville, Ky., locating it near the Seminary. 
The societies of our association are gladly taking their part in raising 
this fund. 

At the annual meeting last year plans were made for furnishing 
a room in the new annex to the Baptist Hospital, in honor of the 
associational superintendent. This money has been raised and is in 
the hands of the treasurer. 

Now is the time for, not only Woman's Missionary Union, but 
the entire church to do its most intensive trainingl for our young 
people so that they may be prepared to play a helpful part in adjust- 
ing the affairs of the world. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SALLIE L. MCCRACKEN. 
32. In the absence of Rev. H. M. Stroup, who wrote the report on 
Public Morals and Law Enforcement, his report was read by Albert 
L. Snider of the Denton church. The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON PUBLIC MORALS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

"Eternal vigilance is the price of the soul" is certainly true in 
the realm of morals. One reason for the re-advent of liquor, beer 
and wine in the United States was the fact that we grew indifferent 
and careless in the matter. The same holds good in all realms of 
conduct. Christians must keep everlastingly at it. There must be 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



"line upon line, percept upon percept, here a little and there a 
little" if we are to have a well informed and sober public. 

There are indications all about us as to the imperative need for 
alertness. Trends in recent years are for the worse. Perhaps, the 
liquor trend is as good index as any other. One reason is there fol- 
lows a multitude of sins in its wake. There are more than twice 
as many places to buy strong drink now than, there were in pre- 
prohibition days. Many of these places are employing girls and 
young women to vend the poison to the public. 

Home relationships are strained and divorces increased many 
fold. Through our lax morals, immorality is on the increase. Of 
course, there is no definite way of checking this as in some other 
cases, yet, the best thinking people are of the opinion "free love" is 
running rampant. Thus a death blow is dealt at the home. 

Yet, as dark as it all seems, there is a real ray of hope in it all. 
World conditions even in the face of war are encouraging. Even a 
Mr. Hitler can prohibit the use of liquor. Poor France is now re- 
penting after reaping the folly of fast living and liquor. A radio an- 
nouncer from New York| City said a few days ago that the liquor 
interests in that state were going to petition the Legislature to re- 
strain women from public bars as they were driving the men away 
by their conduct. So, let us cheer up and take courage. 

Recent victories in Johnston and Pearson counties are indices 
of an awakening in our state. True, if the next Legislature can be 
enduced to give up a state-wide referendum on the matter, we will 
drive legalized liquor from our state. 

Christians can do much by standing by the law in all its en- 
forcements. If irregularities were promptly reported and good people 
appear as witnesses, evil and evil doers would be more careful in going 
into sin. 

"We can co-operate with all religious and civic bodies in further- 
ing righteousness and sobriety in our Association. Thus we can mar- 
shall a mighty force for truth and thus usher in the dawn of a new 
day. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. M. STROUP. 

ADDRESS BY REV. KALE BURGESS 

Rev. Kale Burgess, secretary of the United Dry Forces of Nort^ 
Carolina, from Raleigh, N. C, delivered to the Association an address, 
which was thoroughly enjoyed by all present. 

SPECIAL COLLECTION FOR THE DRY FORCES 

33. By request of the Moderator a Special Collection was taken for 
the benefit of the N. C. Dry Forces. The sum of $15.27 was received. 

34. J. W. Dickens, Jr., read the report on Sunday Schools. Upon 
motion to adopt he discussed the report, after which it was adopted. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

Realizing that the teaching responsibility of the Church rests 
primarily with the Sunday schools, we feel that it is very important 
that at least once in each year, we have made to our associational 
body, a report on this very important work of our denomination. 

We might further state that our Sunday schools should be the 
best schools in the world, because we have as the text book for these 
schools, the Bible. 



22 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



It is very gratifying to note, as we look over the statistical tables 
of our Associations of the state of North Carolina that our own 
Liberty Association has more enrolled in our Sunday schools (6858) 
in 1939, than we have in church membership (6718). However, 
this does not mean that we are doing all that should be 
done, as far as our Sunday schools are concerned. This should only 
be an incentive for us to work for a much larger Sunday school en- 
rollment, because we realize that from our Sunday schools is coming 
our Church membership. 

Feeling the great importance of Sunday school training, permit 
me to quote here in this report, some statements made by our South- 
ern Baptist Sunday school leaders, P. E. Burroughs, Secretary, and 
N. R. Drummond, associate. "The year 1939 has been our best year 
in Sunday school training. Five years ago, 1934, we combined vari- 
ous courses and made a new beginning in the work of training Sun- 
day school officers and teachers. At that time we offered a new 
training course with new and more stringent requirements. We began 
a new system of awards and adopted new methods of keeping records. 

While these radical changes seemed necessary, we yet faced the 
new order with sober concern. Would the people follow our leadership 
in the proposed new day? Had our training ministry really rooted 
itself in the life of the churches? Would the Sunday school workers 
respond to a challenge with involved sacrifice, expense and continuous 
study? 

These questions have all been answered to our full satisfaction. 
In the face of the difficulty and confusion which were inevitable 
the people have responded bravely and heartily. The Sunday school 
board forces and the state leaders stood solidly together. In the five 
years we have sent out morei than the 700,000 of the books listed 
in the new course, and we have given 724,351 book awards to 345,560 
workers," 

During the year 1939, we find that to our own state of North 
Carolina, 12,740 training awards were issued. 

This information tends to show us that our people are earnestly 
and responsively giving themselves to this great teaching work of our 
great denomination. 

In our vacation Bible school work, we find that the year 1939, 
with over 460 schools, shows a very substantial increase over the year 
1938, with 400 schools. 

In our own Association, we wish to commend our very tireless 
associational Sunday school superintendent, Bro. C. P. Motsinger, and 
his co-workers for their efforts all along the line for more training 
and better Sunday schools in our association. 

While this report might be of a rather optomistic nature, of 
which we are very proud, yet we should not fail to realize that the 
great work of our Sunday schools is but in its infancy as compared 
with the great multitudes which are out yonder in the world without 
Christ, and without hope. So may we ever press onward and upward 
for greater achievements in this field of Christian work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. DICKENS, JR. 
35. The Committee on Time, Place and Preacher, make their re- 
port, which is adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 

We recommend for your adoption the following: 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



TIME — Tuesday and Wednesday, after the first Sunday in Sep- 
tember, 1941, which is Sept. 9th and 10th, 1941. 

CHURCH AND PXiACE— New Friendship, Winston- Salem, Rt. 5. 

PREACHER— N. C. Teague. 

ALTERNATE PREACHER— T. W. Bray. 

CHAS. S. YOUNG, 
W. E. SHIRLEY, 
HUGH L. MILLER, 
N. C. TEAGUE, 

Committee. 

36. Sam J. Smith, Treasurer of the Association, made his report 
which was adopted. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 
Receipts For 1939 Session 

To Amount collected for 1939 Minute Fund $180.00 

Disbursements 

By paid for Secretarial Help $ 5.00 

By paid. Dispatch Printing Minutes $130.00 

By paid Postage $ 7.60 

By paid Charity & Children, printing programs $ 4.00 

Paid Sam J. Smith balance due on 1938 session $ 11.75 

Paid Sam J. Smith, as Clerk $ 21.65 



Totals $180.00 

Balance due me as clerk $8.35 



SAM J. SMITH— Treasurer. 

RECEPTION OF MOUNTAIN VIEW CHURCH 

36. The Committee on Credentials received the following application 
from Mountain View Baptist Church for admittance into the Asso- 
ciation. 

The committee through its chairman. Dr. W. K. McGee, stated 
that they had given the application due consideration and examina- 
tion and recommended that the church be received as a member of 
the Association; upon motion the recommendation was adopted. 

September 4, 1940 

To Committee on Credentials, 

Liberty Baptist Association, 

In Session with Center Hill Baptist Church, 

Route No. 6, Lexington, N. C. 

Dear Brethren: 

We, the members of MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST CHURCH, 
located at Pine Knot in the\ southern section of Davidson County 
midway between Southmont and Denton, respectfully request recep- 
tion into the fellowship of Liberty Baptist Association. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST CHURCH was constituted on Octo- 
ber 8, 1939, with twenty-two charter members. Our present member- 
ship is 34. We have a commodious new building fitted with adequate 
Sunday School and worship facilities, and we are supporting preach- 
ing services twice monthly on the first and third Sundays. Rev. 
Charles S. Young, of Lexington, is serving as our pastor. 

Our field is in a section where we have Sunday school possibilities 
for an enrollment of 140 and a growing church membership is in 
prospect. We expect to support an annual revival for the deepening 
of the spiritual life of our people and for the evangelization of our 



24 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



community. We believe in and expect to support all of the Mission- 
ary and Benevolent causes dear to the hearts of North Carolina Bap- 
tists. 

We feel that our work will be greatly encouraged by our reception 
into the full fellowship of Liberty Baptist Association at an early 
date, and we hereby promise solemnly and joyfully to do our utmost 
to fulfill the obligations of a member-church of the Association. 

Fraternally Yours, 
MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST CHURCH, 

Davidson County. 

Done by order of the Church in Business Conference, Sept. 1st 
CHAS. S. YOUNG C. P. CARRICK, 

Pastor-Moderator Deacon-Clerk (Pro Tern.) 

37. From reports sent to the Association it was shown that the 
church at Mountain View had made the following gifts since its or- 
ganization a few months ago. Pastor's salary, $60.00; other salaries, 
$11.00; Ministerial help in meetings, $30.00; on erection of building, 
$300.00; incidentals, $4.00; Sunday school literature, $14.00; help to 
local poor, $6.00; and to other objects $26.00. 

To State Missions $4.00, and to the Orphanage $14.00. 

These figures were given to the Clerk of the Association after 
the tables to be printed in the minutes of the Association had been 
made up. 

38. The report of the Resolutions Committee was read by Loyd E. 
Lookabill and ui>on motion was adopted. 

REPORT OF RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

The Committee on Resolutions, on behalf of the Liberty Baptist 
Association, wish to extend to the Saints of Center Hill church, deep 
gratitude for your Christian hospitality, in the use of your beautiful 
building and for the delicious meals, and for the gracious spirit of 
fellowship extended all who attended the Association meeting in their 
one hundred and eighth session, September 3-4, 1940. 

Respectfully yours, 

REV. T. W. BRAY, 
LLOYD E. LOOKABILL, 
A. L. FRANK, 

Committee. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES & ADJOURNMENT 

39. Motion was made that after the reading of this report and the 
prayer following same the Association stand adjourned. The mo- 
tion prevailed. 

The report of the Committee on Obituaries was read by Miss 
Charlotte Tedder, of the Lexington church. 

By the request of Miss Tedder the Association stood while she 
read a list of the members, who had died during the past year, and 
while the Body was lead in a closing- prayer by Mrs. R. S. Green of 
the Thomasville church. Thus the Association stood with bowed 
heads in memory of these dear ones, during the reading of the list 
and prayer. 

For a list of the names see page 35. 

R. D. COVINGTON, 

Moderator 
SAM J. SMITH, 

Clerk 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



PROCEEDINGS 



OP THE 



W. M. U. OF LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 



The Woman's Missionary Union of Liberty Association held its 
annual meeting April 19, 1940, with Abbotts Creek church. Miss Sallie 
L. McCracken, Associational Superintendent, presided. "The Firm 
Foundation" was the theme for the program which began at 10 
o'clock with the hymn, "How Firm a Foundation." Mrs. W. K. McGee 
was welcomed into the association and was made pianist for the day. 
Mrs. W. A. Shoaf conducted the devotional, using I Cor. 3:9-15 and 
other Scripture. Rev. E. C. Roach led in prayer. The Union was 
greeted by Rev. T. W. Bray, pastor of the hostess church. In the 
absence of Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Miss Sallie McCracken gave brief re- 
sponse. Pastors and visitors were recognized at this time. Visitors 
were Miss Elizabeth Hale, Missionary to China, and her mother, Mrs. 
Fred D. Hale, of South Boston, Va., Miss Mary Currin, State Young 
People's Leader; Miss Ellen Daniel, Divisional Young People's Leader; 
Mrs. H. A. BUnight, Vice President of the Greensboro Division. 

Reports of Associational officers: "Supported by His Word." 



I— CHURCHES CONDUCTING W. M. U. MISSION STUDY 



1 Abbotts Creek 

2 Churchland 

3 Denton 

4 Erlanger 

5 HoUoways 

6 Jersey 

7 Lexington (First) 

8 Liberty 

9 Mills Home 

10 New Friendship 

11 Reeds 

12 Reid Street 

13 Sheets Memorial 

14 Southside 

15 Thomasville (First) 

16 Welcome 



FOR THE YEAR 1939 



MISSION STUDY 



CLASSES 



II— W. M. S. 



Number of classes enrolled . 

Number enrolled 

Awards— No. 1 Record Cards 
Awards — No. 2 Record Cards 

Silver Seals 

Officials Seals 

Certificates for Official Seals 

Honor Certificates 

Continuation Certificates 

Advanced Course Seals 



443 



. 46 
.481 
. 72 
. 39 



6 
1 
2 
28 
1 



26 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



W. M. S. Reading- Cards v 21 

W. M. S. Reading Seals 33 

III~YOUNG WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

Number of classes held 13 

Number enrolled 85 

Awards, Certificates 24 

Awards, Seals i*'.... 63 

Awards, Reading Stamps 12 

IV— GIRL'S AUXILIARY 

Number of classes 8 

Number of enrollment 187 

Awards, Certificates 87 

Awards, Seals 74 

V— ROYAI. AMBASSADORS 

Number of classes held 7 

Number enrolled 142 

Awards, Certificates 63 

Awards, Seals 74 

VI— SUNBEAMS 

Number of classes held 6 

Number enrolled 138 

Awards, Certificates 78 

Awards, Seals 77 

VII— PIONEER CLASSES 

W. M. S 1— New Friendship 

Sunbeam 1— First Church, Lexington 

VIII— TOTALS 

Number of classes held 8C 

Number enrolled 1,033 

Number of awards 1,189 

This report represents a distinct forward step in Mission Study. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. LOUIS S. GAINES. 

STEWARDSHIP 

Mrs. C. L. Berrier gave an interesting discussion on the subject 
Stewardship. We do not have reports from all the churches; but 
of the 8 societies in 4 churches reporting, there are 85 tithers and 
16 Hundred Thousand Clubs. Mrs. Berrier urges the societies to 
emphasize Stewardship during the year 1940. 

PERSONAL SERVICE 

The number of societies that reported personal service work 
this year— 46 societies in 18 churches. Five years ago we had 33 
societies in 13 churches. We are slowly gaining ground in Personal 
Service. Number reporting this year— W. M. S. 18, Y. W. A. 9, G. A. 
7, R. A. 6, Sunbeams 6. Kinds of Personal Service done: Gifts to 
Mills Home, clothing girl at Mills Home, helping needy families, 
helping expectant mothers, getting needed clothes for persons going 
to hospital, and getting clothes for a girl going to college; meeting 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



with Negro women, holding service with prisoners, visiting jail, and 
helping in Vacation Bible School; carrying flowers to sick and shut- 
ins, keeping church clean and caring for church grounds. 

MRS. A. F. WARFFORD, 
Personal Service Chairman. 

Extracts from her discussion follow: 

All of us gathered here today know something of the Training 
School in Louisville, owned by the Woman's Missionary Union of the 
South. Former students know it best by the name "House Beautiful." 
For three and thirty years this school has been teaching and training 
young women for world service. More than two thousand women 
have received training here, 201 of which have gone as foreign mis- 
sionaries to 18 different countries. The school built in 1907 now East 
Broadway must soon be moved because this section of Louisville has 
now become a business district with much noise and smoke. We 
have a dream which we gathered here today must help realize — 
that of building adjoining the Southern Baptist Theological Sem- 
inary a new "House Beautiful" for the Women of the South who 
seek to train themselves for World service in our W. M. U. Training 
school. 

May I suggest that during 1940, each one of us become a "Train- 
ing School Builder" by making some offering to the $100,000 needed 
to build the Training School on the new site, and a fund for the 
education of children of both Foreign and Home Missionaries. Two 
hundred and fifty dollars is allowed each student a year, except in 
cases where the students are taking preparatory or post-graduate 
work when $200 a year is given. To know of the Margaret Fund 
and have no part in it would be to lose some of the joy of this 
worthy enterprise. 

Have a part in both the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering and the 
Annie W. Armstrong Offering, for it is from these two offerings 
that most of the money for the Margaret Fund is gotten. 

Do something for the Margaret Fund students attending school 
in our own state. We may secure the names of these from our 
Raleigh W. M. U. office. 

In response to the Roll Call of Societies the representatives from 
each society stood and the president of each or someone appointed 
by her gave report of outstanding events or accomplishments of her 
society. These reports were quite encouraging. Reports of Superin- 
tendent and Treasurer were postponed until afternoon. 

Mrs. H. A. Knight spoke briefly of rearranging the W. M. U. of 
N. C. into divisions and gave important information concerning the 
Greensboro Division of which Liberty Association is a part. Com- 
mittees were appointed after which the congregation sang "Worship 
the King." 

A special feature of the morning was the Missionary address by 
Miss Elizabeth Hale of China. We rejoiced to hear her tell in her 
attractive manner of the great effect of Christianity in the life of 
the Chinese people. 

The morning session closed at 12:30 with the benediction pro- 
nounced by Rev. H. M. Stroup. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The afternoon session was "Young People's Hour." The theme 
for the program was "Building Today and Tomorrow for Christ." 



28 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



The congregation sang "My Hope Is Built." The report of the Super- 
intendent and that of the Treasurer were given at this time. 

SUPERINTENDENT 

KNOW YOUR DIVISION— The old Charlotte Division, composed 
of 26 associations is no more. We are now in a small family group, 
with the family name changed from Charlotte Division to Greensboro 
Division, which is made up of five associations. Liberty, Piedmont, 
Pilot Mountain, Randolph and Rowan. We are happy to announce 
that we have our same capable leader, Mrs. B. K. Mason, of Winston- 
Salem, as Superintendent of the Greensboro Division. 

During the year 1939 we had 79 societies in 28 churches. Our total 
contributions amounted to $7,536.10, an advance over 1938 of $334.92. 
For the first time, so far as I can learn, we reached all the points in 
the Associational Standard of Excellence. 

The goal for 1939 was for a five per cent increase in the Co- 
operative Program over that of 1938. While some of the societies 
did not make the required increase, others went ahead, so that en- 
abled us to make the standard in the association. This year we are 
asked to increase the gifts to Cooperative Program five per cent 
above the 1939 gifts. The goal for the association for the year is 
$4,391.20 for Cooperative Program. For the first quarter of the year 
we raised $1,139.67 for the Cooperative program and $1,782.34 for all 
purposes. 

We have all been thrilled by the Mission Study Report which is 
by far the best we have ever had. 

We wish to note with pleasure the helpful changes in the blanks 
for quarterly reports. 

New Friendship and Thomasville churches maintain their rating 
as Full Graded A-1 societies. Besides these, we have the following 
A-1 individual societies: Reid Street W. M. S., Thomasville; Naomi 
Schell G. A., Mills Home; Erlangen R. A.; Mills Home Sunbeams; 
Reeds Sunbeams. 

Last year at our annual meeting plans were made to furnish a 
room at the Baptist Hospital. The Treasurer's report will show what 
has already been contributed to that fund. 

As we go forward in this new year's work, let up keep ever In 
mind our two watchwords: one for the year, "Be ye steadfast, un- 
movable, always abounding in the work of the Lord"; and our per- 
manent one: "For we are laborers together with God." 

SALLIE L. MCCRACKEN, 

Superintendent. 



TREASURER 

Receipts: 

Forward from 1933 $ 8.01 

Collected during 1939 25.05 



Total receipts $33.06 $33.06 

Disbursements: 

To Miss Sallie L. McCracken for expense $5.00 

To Miss McCracken for postage & expense 10.00 



Total disbursements $15.00 15.00 



Balance on hand January 1, 1940 $18.06 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



You will recall that at our last annual meeting the W. M. S. 
of Liberty Association voted to furnish a room in the new annex now 
being built at the Baptist Hospital in Winston- Salem and to call it 
the Sallie McCracken Hospital Room in honor of our beloved Super- 
intendent who has served us so faithfully for twenty years, eight 
years as Secretary-Treasurer and twelve years as Superintendent. We 
have received up to this time $140.15 for this purpose. 

MRS. MASKEY M. SMITH, 

Treasurer 

The devotional for the afternoon session was given by Rev. J. A. 
Neilson, Divisional Royal Ambassador Leader. This was a great 
spiritual message. 

REPORT OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S LEADER 

Jesus took a little child and set him in their midst, in the center 
where all could see and think about the characteristics of childhood 
and that all might understand the importance of childhood. 

Woman's Missionary Union has realized the importance of Mis- 
sionary Education and has provided organizations for their training. 
The Woman's Missionary Societies have realized their responsibility 
to foster the Young People's organizations. 

In the Liberty Association reporting last year we had 13 Y. W. 
A.'s representing 13 churches, 24 G. A.'s representing 15 churches, 
13 R. A.'s representing 10 churches, 11 Sunbeams representing 11 
churches to foster. 

These organizations representing only 17 churches out of 28 in 
our association. So you see we have a task ahead for 1940. There 
are 3 other churches that have Missionary Societies making a total 
of 20 churches that have one or more Missionary organizations. 

For this first quarter 1940 there have been 5 new organizations 
reporting— Stoners Grove reports a Y. W. A., R. A., and G. A., and 
Denton reports a Sunbeam band organized and also Mills Home 
a G. A. 

At the close of our first quarter March 30th, there was held at 
First Church Lexington a joint Mission Study and Young People's 
Leader Conference in which we met to discuss plans and problems. 
There were 34 present from 10 churches. We hope to continue these 
conferences each year to receive information and inspiration that we 
may reach out to these 11 churches which as yet have| no Young 
People's organizations. 

The year 1939 marks a year of progress. As "builders together 
with God" what could symbolize our work with Young People better 
than does a trowel, the instrument used in moulding plastic ma- 
terials? May our work this year be a veritable trowel of Prayer 
thorough Preparation, and Zeal to mold for Christ our Young 
People. 

MRS. N. C. TEAGUE, 
Young People's leader. 
Following Mrs. Teague's report. Miss Ellen Daniel gave an ad- 
dress on Young People's Work. Both Mrs. Teague and Miss Daniel 
emphasized the importance of training our Young People. 
Reports of committees: 

TIME AND PLACE 

Committee on Time and Place recommend that the next meeting 



30 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSCXHATION 



be held with Denton Church, at the usual time in April, 1941. 

MRS. FLORENCE MOTSINGER, 
MRS. T. W. HARRIS, 
MRS. ALDA CRAVER, 

Committee 

APPRECIATION 

On behalf of the representatives attending the annual meeting 
of the W. M. U. of Liberty Baptist Association we wish to express our 
grateful appreciation for the gracious welcome and Christian cour- 
tesy extended to us by the pastor and members of Abbotts Creek 
Baptist Church in whose beautiful and spacious building we are 
assembled. 

We would also thank those who provided such a bountiful repast 
which was thoroughly enjoyed by all who participated. 

Last, but in no means least, we are grateful for the inspiring and 
informing program of the day and for those who made and con- 
tributed whatsoever to its success. It has been a day of spiritual 
fellowship and stimulation which will be long remembered by those 
who attended. 

MRS. J. A. NEILSON, 
MRS. P. M. HENDRIX, 

Committee 

NOMINATIONS 

Superintendent— Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 

Associate Superintendent — ^Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C. 

Young People's Leader— Mrs. N. C. Teague, Rt. 3, Lexington, N. C 

Sec.-Ti'eas. — Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, Rt. 6, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Personal Service — Mrs. A. P. Warfford, Rt. 6, Lexington, N. C. 

Margaret Fund and Training School— Mrs. R. G. Jennings 
Thomasville, N. C. 

Mission Study — ^Mrs. I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C. 

Stewardship— Mrs. P. M. Hendrix, Lexington, N. C. 

MRS. R. S. GREEN, 
MRS. J. W. TUTTLE, 
MRS. S. O. HINKLE, 

Committee 

Mrs. R. S. Green received the vote which was unanimous. 

IN MEMORIAM 
Miss Roxie Sheets led in this service using Rev. 14:13, after 
v/hich Mrs. P. M. Hendrix sang "Sunrise Tomorrow." Miss Sheets 
then presented a Memorial Wreath and placed it in a flower in 
memory of these: 

Lexington — ^Mrs. J. W. Hankins. 
Thomasville— Mrs. Archibald Johnson. 
HoUoways— Mrs. Mollie Cross. 
Miss Charlotte Tedder led in prayer. 

MISS ROXIE SHEETS, 
MRS. GRAHAM BARNES, 
MRS. W. O. BECK, 

Committee. 

Mr. Carey Davis led the Young People of Abbotts Creek Church 
in entertainment with pantomime and songs for which service we 
arc grateful. The meeting was adjourned with the benediction led 
by Rev. J. A. Neilson. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



PROCEEDINGS 

OP THE 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY 
SCHOOL MEETINGS HELD DURING 
THE PAST YEAR 



During the past year the Liberty Baptist Associational Sunday 
School Conference held its regular quarterly meetings as follows: 
(All meetings convene at 2:30 P. M.) 

October 1, 1939 — ^Met with the Liberty Church. Devotional con- 
ducted by C. V. Teague. This meeting was designated "Superintend- 
ents Day." Helpful talks were made by some of them. Miss Char- 
lotter Tedder gave the main address on "Some Worthwhile Qualities 
of a Sunday School Superintendent." Following this was the roll 
call showing 109 persons present, with 14 churches represented. The 
following officers were elected for one year: (General Superintendent 
elected by Liberty Baptist Association each year) 

General Superintendent C. F. Motsinger 

Associate Superintendent J. W. Dickens 

Secretary and Treasurer Maskey M. Smith 

G. W. Miller, B. J. May and John L. Snyder 
Group Superintendents — L. W. Hansel, Choister; Mrs. Nyal Yar- 
brough, Pianist. 

In conclusion. Rev. H. M. Stroup brought a stirring message on 
"The Greatest Challenge of the Sunday School." The next meeting 
is to be at Center Hill Church. 

January 7, 1940— Met with Center Hill Church. Following the 
Devotional conducted by Rev. E. C. Roach, the roll was called showing 
11 churches represented with 45 persons present. This meeting was 
designated "Teachers Day." Subjects discussed were: "Using De- 
partment Books In Sunday School Training," by Mrs. John Lane, our 
State Sunday School worker; "My Idea of a Good Sunday School 
Teacher," by Grover H. Jones, of High Point. The First Baptist 
Church of Lexington is appointed for the next meeting. 

April 7, 1940— Met with the First Church in Lexington. Devo- 
tional conducted by Mr. Paul Grey. The roll call showed 15 churches 
represented and a total of 101 persons present. Subjects discussed 
were: "Our Baptist Hospital," by Mrs. J. J. Roddock, of Winston- 
Salem. This was a timely message and well received. "How to Have 
a Growing Sunday School," by R. D. Covington. This was an able 
discussion by a successful worker. A general discussion on the sub- 
ject of "Daily Vacation Bible Schools" in the churches this summer 
was directed by the General Superintendent, C. F. Motsinger. By 
invitation this Conference will meet with the Wallburg Church for its 
July meeting. 

July 7, 1940— Met with the Wallburg Church. Devotional con- 
ducted by Rev. H. M. Stroup. Roll call showed 12 churches represented 
and 66 persons present. The program was rather diversified but in- 
teresting and instructive as follows: 

"The Value of a Program in Sunday School Work," by C. C. Wall. 

"How to Use the Bible in the Class," by Raymond Wilson. 



32 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



"Presenting Denominational Objects to the Sunday School," by 
C. V. Teague. 

"How Can We Make a Sunday School Evangelistic," by R. D. Cov- 
ington. 

"What Can Be Done at a Sunday School Workers Council," by 
Rev. H. M. Stroup. 

"About Visitation," by L. E. Lockell. 

"What Is Done at a Sunday School Workers Council," by Rev. 
L. J. Matthews. 

"Why Should We Use Baptist Literature?" General discussion 
proved it wisest and best. 

"How to Elect Sunday School Officers and Teachers." General 
discussion decides Church should do so in conference. 

"Principles of the Inspired Word of God," this was the main 
address, and delivered by Rev. E. C. Roach. This message called us 
closer to the Holy Scriptures. 

A committee to nominate a General Superintendent for thif 
Conference to the Liberty Baptist Association meeting in September 
were as follows: R. D. Covington, C. C. Wall, and Rev. L. J. Mat- 
thews. Next meeting to be held with Denton Church. 

C. F. MOTSINGER, 
General Superintendent 
MASKEY M. SMITH, 

Secretary 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

LIBERTY ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. MEETINGS 
HELD DURING THE YEAR 



The First Liberty Association Training Union was privileged to 
hold its last meeting of the year 1939 with the Denton Baptist Church 
on Sunday, October 29th, 2:30 o'clock, sharing the Fiftieth Anni- 
versary of this growing Church. 

Miss Charlotte Tedder of Lexington gave our Devotional. 

It was voted that we hold our next meeting with the Stoners 
Grove Church on the second Sunday in January, 1940. 

Rev. Stroup presented the matter of securing State Workers for 
our Association sometime next summer. After thorough discussion 
the motion was made and carried that the Director write the State 
Board regarding this matter, and give a report at the next meeting. 

We were favored with special music by the Carolina Avenue 
Quartette. 

A most interesting talk and demonstration on "How to Conduct 
a Bible Quiz Successfully" was given by Miss Texie Sowers, of 
Churchland and Thomasville. 

The Attendance Banner was awarded the Denton Union. 

Our Inspirational and Challenging Address was given by Mr 
Grover H. Jones, of High Point, whose subject was, ''Behold, I Have 
Set Before Thee An Open Door." 

Mr. Eddinger closed the meeting with prayer. 

The Second Liberty Association Training Union Meeting was 
held with the Stoners Grove Baptist Church on Sunday, January 
14th, at 2:30 o'clock, with an attendance of 62. 

The Song Serviced was in charge of Mr. Wilbur Lewis, of High 
Point. 

Mr. J. J. Embry of Reid Street gave the Devotional on "Facing 
the New Year." 

In the Business Session after the reading of a letter from Mr. 
Brooks, relative to State Field Workers, the motion was made and 
carried that they be asked to work in our Association sometime dur- 
ing the summer. 

Rubye Connell gave a talk on "How to Conduct a Weekly Pro- 
gram Successfully." 

The Place Committee, consisting of Messrs. Francis Hunt, Looka- 
bill and Banks, reported Rich Fork as the place of next meeting. 

The Attendance Banner was awarded the Stoners Grove Train- 
ing Union. 

The Inspirational Address, "The Holy Spirit, Our Guide," was 
given by Rev. E. C. Roach of Erlanger. 

The Third Liberty Association Training Union held its Quar- 
terly Meeting with the Rich Fork Baptist Church on Sunday after- 
noon, March 31st, 2:30 o'clock, with an attendance of 189, Reid 
Street having the largest percentage present. 

The Devotional was led by Mr. Wilbur Lewis of High Point. 

After the business session, we had an Adult Reading by om 



34 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



only participant in the Regional Adult Scripture Reading Contest, 
Mrs. Eunice Wood of Thomasville First Church. There was only one 
other contestant for any of our Regional Tournaments, Mary Frances 
Dameron, also of Thomasville First Church, who entered the Sword 
Drill Contest. 

The Place Committee, consisting of Messrs. Francis Hunt, L. W 
Hansen and Lookabill, reported Abbotts Creek as the next place of 
meeting. 

Rev. L. S. Gaines of Lexington, gave the Inspirational Message 
of the afternoon. 

The Fourth Liberty Association Training Union held its third 
Quarterly Meeting of the year with the Abbotts Creek Baptist Church 
on Sunday afternoon, June 27th, 1940, at 2:30 o'clock. 

The Devotional was led by Mr. Carrick Teague, of Wallburg. 

Plans for our Training Union Week in July were discussed brief- 
ly in the Business Session. The Nominating Committee, composed 
of L. W. Hansen, Chairman, Miss Mozelle Clinard and A. L. Snider 
submitted the following group of Officers to serve for the coming 
year: 

Director Mr. W. R. Eddinger 

Associate Director Miss Charlotte Tedder 

Secretary- Treasurer Miss Rubye Connell 

Chorister Mr. Wilbur Lewis 

Pianist Mr. Carey Davis 

Publicity Chairman Mr. Fred Golightly 

Group Directors: 

No. 1 — Thomasville Mrs. Eunice Wood 

No. 2— Lexington Mrs. Tolbert Stroud 

No. 3— Denton Mr. V. K. Skeen 

Department Leaders: 

Adult Miss Etta Teague 

Young People Mr. J. R. Williams 



The motion was made and carried that this report be adopted. 

The Place Committee reported Reeds Church as the place of 
next meeting on September 29th. 

Mrs. Tolbert Stroud of Lexington First Church gave a very in- 
teresting talk on, "How to Organize and Build Adult Unions." 

An informal discussion on "Organizing a Training Union In 
Every Church In Our Association" v/as led by the Associational 
Director, with a number of members participating. 

The Inspirational Message of the afternoon was given by Mr 
A. L. Snider, of Denton, in the absence of his Pastor, whose subject 
was, "Christian Youth wni Determine Christian America of To- 
morrow." 

Rev. N. C. Teague closed the meeting with prayer. 



Intermediate 
Junior 



Miss Elizabeth Smith 
Mrs. Dozier Linden 



RUBYE CONNELL, Secretary. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



35 



Who Have Answered The Last Roll Call Since 
Last Session. 



"In My Father's House Are Many Mansions 
I Go to Prepare A Place For You" 
John 14-2 



ABBOTTS CREEK— Mrs. Mary M. Bodenheimer, Mrs. Cora A 
Smith. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mr. J. E. Hoyle, Mr. Walter Lambeth, 

Mrs. Annie Lowder. 
CENTER HILL— Mrs. Eliza Sheets, Mr. A. H. Michael, Mr 

Clyde Palmer, Mr. Paul Tysinger. 
CHURCHLAND— Mrs. W. H. Barnes, Miss Norine Sowers, Mrs 

M. M. Owens, Mr. J. H. Kesler, Mrs. J. H. Hilliard. 
DENTON— Mrs. Cicero Ward. 
ERLANGER — ^Mr. M. Y. Shoemaker. 

JERSEY— Mrs. J. D. Palmer, Mrs. Charlie Barnes, Mrs. Emma 
Hanner. 

LIBERTY— Mr. James Fine, Mrs. Mary Hughes, Mr. J. L 
Woodard. 

LEXINGTON— Deacon H. W. Hinshaw, Mr. C. L. Davis, Mr. 
James Y. Morris, Jr., Mrs. P. L. Sneed, Miss Mary 
Trice, Mr. A. D. Yarbrough, Mr. J. P. Landis. 

LICK CREEK— -Mr. A. L. Taylor. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mr. Holland Swain, Mr. Charles A. Jones 

Mr. John A. Baker. 
OAK HILL MEMORIAL— M. F. Underwood. 
REEDS — Mrs. Sarah J. Myrick, Mrs. Emma Grubb, Deacon J 

F. Foster, Mr. B. F. Ausband, Mr. J. W. Massey, Mr 

Ray Foster. 
RICH FORK— Mr. G. T. Everhart. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mr. Mack Byars, Mr. D. H. Smith. 
SMITH GROVE— Mrs. Sadie Monsees, Mr. O. O. Rickard, Mr. 

W. H. Lomax. 
SOUTHSIDE— One reported, but name not given. 
STONERS GROVE— Mrs. Lee Mahalla. 

SUMMERVILLE— Mrs. John Henderson, by error omitted last 

year; Mrs. Rinda Garner. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. Archibald Johnson, Mr. J. B. Johnson. 
WALLBURG— Mr, John P. McCuiston. 

Signed : 

REV. J. A. NEILSON, MRS. LOIS SINK 
MRS. E. C. ROACH, J. C. LEONARD 
MRS. E. C. ROACH, J. N. PENNINGER 
J. N. P ENNI NGER, JR., 
CHARLOTTE TEDDER, 

Committee On Obituaries 



36 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 



ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE 
CHURCHES OF THE LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Name 



Bray, T. W. 
Britt. N. F. 
Caldwell, R. N. 
Cox, J. A. 
Digh. D. W. 
Eagle, E. F. 
Eddinger, C. C. 
Gaines, Louis S. 
James, Farrell 
Flowe, T. B. 
Gallimore, A. R. 
Hopkins. W. B. 
Hunt, Howard 
Lanning, Otis 
Matthews. L. J. 
Mumford, E F. 
McGee. W. K. 
McMillan, J. A. 
Neilson, J. A. 
Newton, J. D. 
Pickler, J. M. 
Roach. E. C. 
Snider. S. G. 
Stroup, H. M. 
Teague, N. C. 
Young. C. S. 



Address 



Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Troy, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Salisbury. N. C, Rt. 4 
Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 4 
Welcome, N. C. 
Lexington. N, C. 
Proximity, Greensboro, 
Concord. N. C. 
Lexington, N. C. 
China Grove. N. C. 
Denton, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
W. -Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 
High Point. N. C, Rt. 1 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Wingate. N. C. 
Erlnnger. N. C. 
Asheboro, N. C. 
Denton. N. C. 
Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 
Lexington, N. C. 



Church 



Rich Pork 

Southside 

Taylors Grove 

Carolina Avenue 

Center Hill 

Jersey 

Welcome 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Lick Creek 

Lexington 

Walters Grove 

Pleasant Plaines 

Reid Street 

Wallburg 

Abbotts Creek 

Thomasville 

Mills Home 

Mills Home 

Thomasville 

Taylors Grove 

Erlanger 

Sximmerville 

Denton 

Reeds 

Sheets Memorial 



Work 



Pastor 

Pastor 

Member 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Missionary 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Member 

l»astor 

Editor 

Pastor 

Retired 

l^astor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 

Pastor 



ASSISTANTS TO PASTORS OR EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 



Name 


Address 


Church 


Work 


Tedder, Charlotte 
Gillespie, Vessie 


Lexington 
Thomasville 


Lexington 
Thomasville 


Church Secretary 
Educational Director 



MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 

None. 

PRESIDENTS OF LOCAL BROTHERHOODS 

Newman James, Winston- Salem, Rt. 6, New Friedburg Church. 



CHOIR DIRECTORS 

Church Name snd Address 

Abbotts Creek Carey Davis, Kernersville, N. C, Rt. 1 

Carolina Avenue Willie Gilliam, Thomasville, N. C, 

Center Hill J. B. Helms, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Churchland Mrs. Jack Kesler, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5 

Denton Mrs. E. C. Clyatt, Denton, N. C. 

Erlanger Mrs. E. C. Putnam, Erlanger, N. C. 

Holloways G. C. Palmer, Lexington, N. C. 

Jersey R. L. Palmer, Linwood, N. C. 

Lexington Miss Louise Martin, Lexington, N. C. 

Liberty Mrs. Austin Sink, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2 

Lick Creek Miss Virginia Cole, Denton, N. C, Rt. 1 

Mills Home W. B. Lord, Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship Robert Hartman, Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 

Oak Hill Memorial J. C. Creed, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



Pleasant Plaines Rev, Howard Hunt, Denton, N. C. 

Reeds E. G. Fritts, Reeds, N. C. 

Reid Street J. V. Luther, Thomasville, N. C 

Rich Fork Wilbur Lewis, High Point, N. C. 

Sheets Memorial Spurges Ayers, Lexington, N. C. 

Smith Grove Herman Grubb, Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 4 

Southside None 

Stoners Grove Miss Ruth Hollis, Southmont, N. C. 

Summerville Miss Emma Carrick, Denton, N. C 

Thomasville First Mrs. Alvah Boyles, Thomasville, N. C. 

Taylors Grove Mrs. Roy Owens, New London, N. C, Rt. 2 

Wallburg Paul Craven, Wallburg, N. C. 

Walters Grove .... Miss Mammie Lee Gallimore, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 2 
V/elcome Raymond Disher, Welcome, N. C. 



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LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



45 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Yr. 



1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1S37 
1838 
183f. 
1840 
1841 
18i2 
1S4: 

18 

1844 
1845 
1S4G 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
188;- 
18S4 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1890 
1891 
1892 

i89r: 

1894 
1895 
189G 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 



WHERE HELD 



IJamestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 

SBig Creek 

IJamestown 
Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big- Creek 
2Pine Meeting- H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

Summerville 

Lexington 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H 

High Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant Grove 

Denton 
SPiney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

Lexington 

Lick Creek 



PREACHER 



Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 

Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stokes 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
H. jMorton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Reid 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J. K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 
C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
H. Morten 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 



CLERK 



Will 
Will 
Will 



ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 



Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah 
Azariah 
Azariah 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Williams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
By Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
Owen 
OWen 
Owen 
Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



J. H. 

J. H. 

J. H. 

J. H. 



46 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



WHERE HELD 



Jersey 

JPine Meeting- H 
New Friendship 
Thomas ville 
Wallburg 
Denton 
Liberty 
Orphanage 
Abbotts Creek 
Stoners Grove 
Rich Fork 
Holloways 
Center Hill 
Wallburg 
Smith Grove 
Lexington 
Denton 

New Friendship 

Churchland 

Summerville 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds 

Liberty 

Rich Fork 

Thomasville 

Holloways 

Stoners Grove 

Abbotts Creek 

Denton 

Lexing-ton 

Lick Creek 

Jersey 

Mills Home 

Reeds 

Churchland 

Denton 

Wallburg 

Center Hill 



PREACHER 



W. A. Smith 
Geo. P. Harrill 
John R. Miller 
J. S. Farmer 
Dr. R. T. Vann 
M. L. Kesler 
S. D. Swaim 
O. A. Keller 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
M. L. Kesler 

G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
T. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler 
R. E. White 

J. S. Hardaway 
M. L. Kesler 
W. A. Hough 
W. L. Barrs 
C. H. Trueblood 
C. A. Owens 
E. N. Gardner 

H. T. Penry 
M. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 
M. L. Kesler 

M. O. Alexander 

G. A. Martin 
E. F. Mumford 
W. L. Warfford 
E. C. Roach 

J. A. Neilson 
W. K. McGee 
John A. McMillan 

H. M. Stroupe 
L. C. Gaines 



MODERATOR 



James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A, Martin 
O. A. Keller 
O. A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 
G. W. Miller 
R. D. Covington 
R. D. Covington 



CLERK 



Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 

4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now Wallburg 



\ 



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